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  • WCLC 2018

    19th World Conference on Lung Cancer

    Access to all presentations that occur during the 19th World Conference on Lung Cancer in Toronto, ON

    Presentation Date(s):
    • Sept 23 - 26, 2018
    • Total Presentations: 2384

    To review abstracts of the presentations below, narrow down your search by using the Filter options below, and then select the session listing of your choice. Click the "+" for a presentation to expand & view the corresponding Abstract details.

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    MS02 - The Future of IO (ID 781)

    • Type: Mini Symposium
    • Track: Immunooncology
    • Presentations: 6
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/24/2018, 10:30 - 12:00, Room 106
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    OA01 - Improving Outcomes in Locoregional NSCLC I (ID 892)

    • Type: Oral Abstract Session
    • Track: Treatment of Locoregional Disease - NSCLC
    • Presentations: 8
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/24/2018, 10:30 - 12:00, Room 107
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      OA01.06 - DETERRED:  Phase II Trial Combining Atezolizumab Concurrently with Chemoradiation Therapy in Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (ID 12842)

      11:25 - 11:35  |  Presenting Author(s): Steven H Lin  |  Author(s): Xiuyan Lin, Debora Clay, Luyang Yao, Isabel Mok, Daniel Gomez, Jonathan M Kurie, George R. Simon, George R Blumenschein, Jenean Young, See Phan, Alan Sandler, Vassiliki A Papadimitrakopoulou, John V Heymach, Anne S. Tsao

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background

      While consolidation immunotherapy after chemoradiation (CRT) is the current standard of care for locally advanced NSCLC (LA-NSCLC), the effectiveness of immunotherapies may be enhanced when combined concurrently with CRT. We report on the safety and preliminary efficacy of combining PD-L1 blockade using atezolizumab (atezo) and concurrent CRT followed by consolidation full dose carboplatin/paclitaxel (CP) with atezo and maintenance atezo up to 1 year for LA-NSCLC.

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      This is a single institution phase II study in LA-NSCLC assessing the safety and feasibility of adding atezo to CRT in two parts: I) sequentially (N=10) with CP after completing CRT, or II) concurrently (N=30) with CRT followed by consolidation atezo with CP. Atezo was given at 1200 mg IV Q3 weeks for up to one year from the first dose. Radiation dose at 60-66 Gy in 30-33 fractions was combined with weekly low dose CP, followed by 2 cycles of full dose CP. Severe adverse events (AEs) ≥ grade 3 are defined within 15 weeks of start of therapy or any immune-related AEs during atezo treatment. Evaluable patients (pts) have received at least one dose of atezo.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      From February 2016 to April 2018, we accrued 40 evaluable pts. For part 1, any grade 3+ AEs was seen in 6 pts (60%), with most common being pneumonia (2 of 10, 20%). Three grade 3+ AEs (30%) were attributed to atezo, including dyspnea, arthralgia and a grade 5 TE fistula. Grade 2 radiation pneumonitis (RP) was seen in 3 pts. Four progressed with disease during atezo maintenance and have died, ranging from 0.93 to 1.86 years. Four pts completed atezo and are in follow up without recurrence. For part 2, 17 of 30 pts had any grade 3+ AEs (57%), with pneumonia being the most common (6 of 30, 20%). Three (10%) were attributed to atezo (dyspnea, fatigue and heart failure). RP was seen in 3 pts, with 2 grade 2 and 1 grade 3, which led to atezo discontinuation. So far, 4 pts have progressed and 4 have died, 2 due to disease and 2 due to treatment (neutropenic sepsis and gastric hemorrhage). All others have completed CRT and are on maintenance atezo, ranging from 5 to 19 doses. Updated efficacy results will be presented.

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      Concurrent atezo with CRT followed by consolidation and maintenance atezo appears safe without increased toxicities compared to CRT alone followed by consolidation and maintenance atezo.

      6f8b794f3246b0c1e1780bb4d4d5dc53

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    OA02 - Novel Therapies in ROS1, HER2 and EGFR (ID 893)

    • Type: Oral Abstract Session
    • Track: Targeted Therapy
    • Presentations: 8
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/24/2018, 10:30 - 12:00, Room 105
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      OA02.06 - A Phase II Trial of Poziotinib in EGFR and HER2 exon 20 Mutant Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) (ID 14277)

      11:25 - 11:35  |  Presenting Author(s): John V Heymach  |  Author(s): Marcelo Vailati Negrao, Jacqulyne Ponville Robichaux, Brett W. Carter, Anisha Patel, Mehmet Altan, Don Lynn Gibbons, Frank Fossella, George R. Simon, Vincent K Lam, George R Blumenschein, Anne S. Tsao, Jonathan M Kurie, Frank Mott, Daveta Jenkins, Dahlia Mack, Lei Feng, Brent Roeck, Zane Yang, Vassiliki A Papadimitrakopoulou, Yasir Y Elamin

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background

      Insertions/mutations in exon 20 of EGFR or HER2 occur in ~3% of all lung adenocarcinomas. These alterations are characterized by primary resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) with response rates of <12%. We previously showed that exon 20 insertions restrict the size of drug-binding pocket, limiting binding of most available TKIs. However, poziotinib can potentially circumvent these steric changes due to its smaller, flexible structure and is a potent inhibitor of EGFR and HER2 exon 20 mutants (Robichaux et al. Nat Med, 2018). Herein, we report the results of an investigator-initiated study of poziotinib in EGFR and HER2 exon 20 mutant NSCLC (NCT03066206).

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      Patients ≥18yrs with metastatic NSCLC bearing mutations/insertions in EGFR or HER2 exon 20 (except EGFR T790M) were eligible. Unlimited prior systemic and targeted therapies were permitted. Poziotinib 16mg PO daily was administered until progression, death, or withdrawal. The primary endpoint was objective response rate (ORR) based on RECIST v1.1. Response was evaluated every eight weeks. A Bayesian design was used with a plan to enroll patients in cohorts of 10 and to terminate the study if ORR was ≤20%. Secondary endpoints included DCR, PFS, OS and safety

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      As of May 3, 2018, the planned EGFR cohort of 50 patients was fully enrolled, and 40 patients were evaluated for response. 65.1% of patients had received at least two prior lines of therapy for metastatic disease. 60% of patients had ≥grade 3 adverse events; most common were skin-rash (27.5%) and diarrhea (12.5%). 45.0% of patients required dose reduction to 12mg, while 17.5% required dose reduction to 8mg. One patient stopped treatment due to grade 3 skin rash. ORR at eight weeks was 58% (95%-CI 40.9-73.0) and the DCR was 90% (95%-CI 76.3-97.2). Among 23 patients who achieved partial response, 15 responses were confirmed with subsequent scans, five responses were unconfirmed, and three patients are pending confirmation. Responses were observed in 8/13 (62%) patients that were previously treated with TKI. Median PFS was 5.6mo (95%-CI 5.06-NA). Furthermore, 13 patients were enrolled in HER2 cohort. Toxicities were similar to EGFR cohort except one case of grade 5 pneumonitis, assessed to be possibly drug related. Twelve patients were evaluated for response with ORR of 50% (95% CI 21.1-78.9) at eight weeks and DCR of 83%.

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      In heavily pre-treated population with EGFR and HER2 exon 20 mutant NSCLC, poziotinib demonstrated encouraging antitumor activity in both TKI-naive and -refractory patients, and manageable toxicity profile.

      6f8b794f3246b0c1e1780bb4d4d5dc53

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    OA05 - Clinical Trials in IO (ID 899)

    • Type: Oral Abstract Session
    • Track: Advanced NSCLC
    • Presentations: 8
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/24/2018, 13:30 - 15:00, Room 106
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      OA05.07 - IMpower132: PFS and Safety Results with 1L Atezolizumab + Carboplatin/Cisplatin + Pemetrexed in Stage IV Non-Squamous NSCLC (ID 12389)

      14:35 - 14:45  |  Presenting Author(s): Vassiliki A Papadimitrakopoulou  |  Author(s): Manuel Cobo, Rodolfo Bordoni, Pascale Dubray-Longeras, Zsuzsanna Szalai, Grigoriy Ursol, Silvia Novello, Francisco Orlandi, Simon Ball, Jerome Goldschmidt Jr., Rachel E Sanborn, Tien Hoang, Diana Mendus, Yu Deng, Marcin Kowanetz, Xiaohui Wen, Wei Lin, Alan Sandler, Makoto Nishio

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background

      In addition to the combination of atezolizumab (anti–PD-L1)+platinum+taxane±bevacizumab, non-squamous NSCLC patients may derive benefit from adding atezolizumab to platinum+pemetrexed. The randomized Phase III IMpower132 study (NCT02657434) evaluated first-line pemetrexed+carboplatin or cisplatin±atezolizumab in patients with stage IV non-squamous NSCLC without EGFR or ALK driver mutations.

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      Patients were randomized 1:1 to receive 4 or 6 cycles of carboplatin AUC 6 mg/mL/min or cisplatin 75 mg/m2 + pemetrexed 500 mg/m2 Q3W alone (arm PP) or in combination with atezolizumab 1200 mg Q3W (arm APP), followed by pemetrexed (arm PP) or atezolizumab + pemetrexed (arm APP) maintenance. Atezolizumab could be continued beyond disease progression per protocol guidelines. PFS and OS were co-primary endpoints. Efficacy by PD-L1 expression was an exploratory endpoint. Here, we present investigator-assessed PFS per RECIST v1.1 (final analysis), OS (interim analysis) and safety data.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      292 pts were enrolled in arm APP and 286 pts in arm PP. 43% and 40% in arms APP and PP, respectively, had ECOG PS 0. At the data cutoff (22 May 2018), median follow-up was 14.8 mo overall. PFS analysis showed a statistically significant improvement between arm APP vs PP (median PFS 7.6 vs 5.2 mo; HR=0.596; 95% CI: 0.494, 0.719; P<0.0001). Interim analysis showed a numerical but non-statistically significant OS improvement (Table). Efficacy results were consistent across all key clinical subgroups. Grade 3-4 TRAEs occurred in 53.6% of patients (APP) vs 39.1% (PP). 7.2% of patients (APP) vs 5.1% (PP) had a Grade 5 AE, 3.8% (APP) vs 2.6% (PP) were treatment related. 48.5% of patients (APP) vs 38.0% (PP) experienced AEs of special interest specific to atezolizumab.

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      IMpower132 met its co-primary endpoint of investigator-assessed PFS in the ITT. Interim OS data (not fully mature) showed numerical improvement. Atezolizumab+pemetrexed+carboplatin or cisplatin was well tolerated, and no new safety signals were identified.

      Table. IMpower132 Efficacy Analyses

      APP Arm
      (atezolizumab+pemetrexed+ carboplatin or cisplatin)
      PP Arm
      (pemetrexed+carboplatin or cisplatin)
      ITT n=292 n=286
      Median PFS (95% CI), mo 7.6 (6.6, 8.5) 5.2 (4.3, 5.6)
      HRa (95% CI; P value) 0.596 (0.494, 0.719; P < 0.0001)
      12-Month PFS (95% CI), % 33.7% (28.2, 39.2) 17.0% (12.6, 21.4)
      Median OS (95% CI), mo 18.1 (13.0, NE) 13.6 (11.4, 15.5)
      HRa (95% CI; P value) 0.813 (0.644, 1.025; P = 0.0797)
      12-Month OS (95% CI), % 59.6% (53.9, 65.3) 55.4% (49.5, 61.2)
      ORR (confirmed, inv-assessed), % 46.9% 32.2%
      DOR (95% CI), mo 10.1 (7.2, 13.3) 7.2 (5.7, 9.0)
      PD-L1–highb n=25 n=20
      Median PFS (95% CI), mo 10.8 (7.9, NE) 6.5 (2.4, 10.6)
      HR (95% CI; P value) 0.464 (0.224, 0.960; P = 0.0339)
      PD-L1–lowb n=63 n=73
      Median PFS (95% CI), mo 6.2 (4.4, 8.4) 5.7 (4.2, 7.9)
      HR (95% CI; P value) 0.804 (0.556, 1.163; P = 0.2462)
      PD-L1–negativeb n=88 n=75
      Median PFS (95% CI), mo 8.5 (6.1, 11.2) 4.9 (4.2, 5.8)
      HR (95% CI; P value) 0.448 (0.313, 0.642; P < 0.0001)

      DOR, duration of response; HR, hazard ratio; inv, investigator; ORR, objective response rate; OS, overall survival; PFS, progression-free survival.

      a Stratified. b Baseline tissue available in 60% of patients. PD-L1high (TC3/IC3): patients with PD-L1 expression in ≥50% of tumor cells or ≥10% of tumor-infiltrating immune cells; PD-L1low (TC12/IC12): patients with PD-L1 expression in ≥1% and <50% of tumor cells or ≥1% and <10% of tumor-infiltrating immune cells; and PD-L1negative (TC0/IC0): patients with PD-L1 expression in <1% of tumor cells and <1% of tumor-infiltrating immune cells.

      NCT02657434

      6f8b794f3246b0c1e1780bb4d4d5dc53

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    P1.13 - Targeted Therapy (Not CME Accredited Session) (ID 945)

    • Type: Poster Viewing in the Exhibit Hall
    • Track:
    • Presentations: 45
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/24/2018, 16:45 - 18:00, Exhibit Hall
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      P1.13-37 - Clinical Evaluation of Plasma-Based (cfDNA) Genomic Profiling in Over 1,000 Patients with Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (ID 14332)

      16:45 - 18:00  |  Presenting Author(s): Hai T Tran  |  Author(s): Vincent K Lam, Mayra E Vasquez, Lingzhi Hong, Rivka Colen, Nabil A Elshafeey, Islam Safwat Ali Hassan, Eric A Prado, Vassiliki A Papadimitrakopoulou, George R Blumenschein, Brett W. Carter, George R. Simon, Lauren Byers, Mehmet Altan, Yasir Y Elamin, Richard B Lanman, Victoria M. Raymond, Anne S. Tsao, Don Lynn Gibbons, Frank Fossella, Jianjun Zhang, John V Heymach

      • Abstract

      Background

      Tumor genomic information from a simple blood collection revealing actionable mutation can improve clinical outcome without the need for an invasive tissue biopsy. We report on the clinical utility of a cell-free DNA (cfDNA) next generation sequencing (NGS) blood test in our patients with non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) and the outcome of treatments with targeted therapies based on the reported mutations.

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      From May 2015 to February 2017, 1078 blood samples from 1011 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of NSCLC were collected and analyzed using next-generation sequencing of cfDNA with a panel of up to 70 cancer-related genes at a CLIA-certified lab (Guardant360, Guardant Health, Redwood City, CA) with reported sensitivity of 0.02% mutant allele fraction with high specificity (> 99.9999%) (CCR 2018 (17):3831). Patients in this retrospective study received targeted therapy as indicated by cfDNA molecular profiling. Tumor response was evaluated by RECIST V1.1 and standard clinical evaluation.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      From 1011 patients, 1078 cfDNA tests sent (additional follow-up tests: 1 in 64 patients and 2 in 3 patients). In 223/1011 (22%) patients had cfDNA report with at least 1 targetable mutations; with 48/223 (22%) patients meeting criteria for this retrospective review. Study population were 31 female:17 male, median age of 63 years (ranged:31-94). The rationale for the blood test included: insufficient tissue or not available (32%), addition to tissue molecular analysis (17%), alternative to tissue biopsy(10%), on-going treatment evaluation/resistance (41%). Mutations included:EGFR T790M (15), EGFR exon 19del (12), EGFR L858R (9), EGFR exon 20 insertion (4), EGFR others (1), ALK gene fusions (5) and MET exon 14 skipping (2). The median line of therapy was 2(ranged:1-7) with 28 patients receiving TKI as 1st line of therapy based on cfDNA mutations. With targeted treatments based on ctDNA results, the responses (RECIST V1.1) were: CR(3), PR(26), SD(14) and PD(4); median PFS was 8.5 months (ranged:1-26mos) for the overall population with 4 patients still receiving targeted therapy. Median PFS was 9.5 months (ranged:1-20 months) for those receiving TKI as 1st line.

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      This is the largest analysis of response rates with cfDNA directed therapy in advanced NSCLC and demonstrates positive clinical outcomes in patients treated with targeted therapy based on plasma identified biomarkers.

      6f8b794f3246b0c1e1780bb4d4d5dc53

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    MA16 - Novel Mechanisms for Molecular Profiling (ID 917)

    • Type: Mini Oral Abstract Session
    • Track: Advanced NSCLC
    • Presentations: 12
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/25/2018, 13:30 - 15:00, Room 203 BD
    • +

      MA16.01 - Frequency and Genomic Context of Emerging Markers for Molecular Testing in Lung Adenocarcinoma in Cell-Free DNA NGS Analysis (ID 13465)

      13:30 - 13:35  |  Presenting Author(s): Vincent K Lam  |  Author(s): Lesli Ann Kiedrowski, Zofia Piotrowska, Anne S. Tsao, Ashley M. Wells, Richard B Lanman, Vassiliki A Papadimitrakopoulou, Rebecca J Nagy

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background

      The recently updated CAP/IASLC/AMP lung cancer molecular testing guideline (Lindeman et al 2018) recommends several genes be analyzed by next-generation sequencing (NGS) in lung adenocarcinoma (LUAD), including EGFR, ALK, BRAF, KRAS, and others. It also includes a list of 20 emerging markers (EMs) for molecular testing and suggests practitioners remain aware of these and other genes between guideline updates. We investigated the frequency of genomic alterations (GAs) in several of these EMs in a cohort of patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma who underwent clinical cell-free DNA (cfDNA) NGS analysis and assessed co-occurrence with canonical driver GAs.

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      Genomic data was reviewed from 6530 patients with at least one GA detected on clinical Guardant360 cfDNA NGS testing (Guardant Health, Inc) with an indicated diagnosis of lung adenocarcinoma from 11/25/16-3/1/18. Synonymous alterations were excluded from further analyses.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      2600 patients (40%) had at least one nonsynonymous alteration in the EM genes assessed; excluding GAs classified as variants of unknown significance (VUS), 1350 patients (21%) had at least one characterized alteration. Table 1 shows number and frequency of GAs observed per patient by gene and alteration type. Of EMs assessed, GAs were observed most commonly in NF1, PIK3CA, PDGFRA, KIT, and FGFR1-2. GAs in multiple EMs, including RIT1, NRAS, FGFR2-3, NTRK1, KIT, and AKT1, were observed co-occurring with established driver alterations, often in a genomic context consistent with resistance to targeted therapy at allelic fractions suggestive of subclonality.

      table 1.jpg

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      Effective therapies are continually emerging for a growing number of molecular biomarkers in lung cancer. Comprehensive genomic profiling with cfDNA NGS can identify GAs in both recommended and EM genes to guide therapeutic decision-making and catalyze clinical trial enrollment. Further investigation of mutual exclusivity and co-occurrence of established drivers and EMs may reveal novel resistance mechanisms and facilitate identification of rational combination therapeutic strategies.

      6f8b794f3246b0c1e1780bb4d4d5dc53

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    MA19 - Genomic Markers of IO Response (ID 922)

    • Type: Mini Oral Abstract Session
    • Track: Immunooncology
    • Presentations: 11
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/25/2018, 15:15 - 16:45, Room 201 BD
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      MA19.10 - Impact of STK11/LKB1 Genomic Alterations on Clinical Outcomes with Chemo-Immunotherapy in Non-Squamous NSCLC (ID 14295)

      16:15 - 16:20  |  Presenting Author(s): Ferdinandos Skoulidis  |  Author(s): Yasir Y Elamin, Vincent K Lam, Jianjun Zhang, Jeff Lewis, Waree Rinsurongkawong, Jack Lee, Jack A Roth, Stephen Swisher, Vassiliki A Papadimitrakopoulou, John V Heymach

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background

      Chemo-immunotherapy with pemetrexed/carboplatin/pembrolizumab represents a standard of care for the first-line treatment of patients with metastatic non-squamous NSCLC, irrespective of tumor cell PD-L1 expression. Genomic determinants of response to chemo-immunotherapy in NSCLC have not been reported thus far. We previously identified STK11/LKB1 alterations as a major genomic driver of de novo resistance to PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitor monotherapy in NSCLC (Skoulidis et al., Cancer Discovery, 2018). Here, we examine the impact of STK11/LKB1 mutations on clinical outcomes with chemo-immunotherapy with pemetrexed/carboplatin/pembrolizumab.

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      Patients with metastatic non-squamous NSCLC that received at least 1 cycle of pemetrexed/carboplatin/pembrolizumab at MD Anderson Cancer Center, were alive for ≥14 days thereafter and had available next generation sequencing- based comprehensive tumor genomic profiling were eligible. Response assessment was based on RECIST1.1. PD-L1 expression on tumor cells was evaluated using the FDA-approved 22C3 pharmDx assay. All patients consented to collection of clinical and molecular data as part of the GEMINI protocol.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      Among 49 eligible patients (median age 61 years, 51% female, 96% adenocarcinoma histology, 34.7% KRAS-mutant) the objective response rate to pemetrexed/carboplatin/pembrolizumab was 51% (25/49) for the overall population. The disease control rate (PR+SD≥ 6 months) differed significantly between STK11/LKB1-mutant and STK11/LKB1-wild-type tumors (31.3% vs 72.7%, P=0.011, two-tailed Fisher’s exact test). The objective response rate was 31.3% for STK11/LKB1-mutant and 60.6% for STK11/LKB1 wild-type tumors (P=0.07, two-tailed Fisher’s exact test). 37.5% (6/16) of STK11/LKB1-mutant tumors exhibited progressive disease as best overall response to chemo-immunotherapy compared with 6.1% (2/33) STK11/LKB1-wild-type tumors (P=0.01, two-tailed Fisher’s exact test). Patients bearing STK11/LKB1-mutant tumors exhibited shorter progression-free survival with chemo-immunotherapy (median PFS 4.4 months vs 11.0 months, P=0.039, log-rank test). STK11/LKB1-mutant tumors were less likely to be positive for PD-L1 expression (PD-L1 TPS ≥ 1%), although the difference did not reach statistical significance (43.8% vs 72%, P=0.1, two-tailed Fisher’s exact test).

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      STK11/LKB1 genomic alterations are associated with inferior clinical outcomes with chemo-immunotherapy in non-squamous NSCLC, with response rates comparable to those previously reported for platinum doublet chemotherapy alone. Assessment of STK11/LKB1 status may help refine treatment approaches in non-squamous NSCLC.

      6f8b794f3246b0c1e1780bb4d4d5dc53

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    P3.04 - Immunooncology (Not CME Accredited Session) (ID 970)

    • Type: Poster Viewing in the Exhibit Hall
    • Track:
    • Presentations: 29
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/26/2018, 12:00 - 13:30, Exhibit Hall
    • +

      P3.04-23 - Phase 1b/2 Study to Evaluate Novel Combinations With Oleclumab (MEDI9447) in Previously Treated Advanced EGFRm NSCLC (ID 12300)

      12:00 - 13:30  |  Presenting Author(s): Naiyer A Rizvi  |  Author(s): Catherine Shu, Sarah B Goldberg, Vassiliki A Papadimitrakopoulou, Ross Camidge, Sandip Patel, Kristen A. Marrone, Sang-We Kim, Dong-Wan Kim, Hsin-ju Hsieh, Nancy Mueller, Rakesh Kumar, Judson Englert, Keunchil Park

      • Abstract
      • Slides

      Background

      Patients with mutant EGFR (EGFRm) non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have a limited chance of benefiting from treatment with programmed death-1 inhibitors. EGFR activation leads to overexpression of CD73 and may provide a mechanism of immune evasion. CD73 overexpression has also led to worse outcomes in multiple tumor types, including NSCLC. Recent studies demonstrated that an orthogonal therapeutic approach to cancer, such as combining tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) with immunotherapy, may result in synergistic clinical activity. Oleclumab is a human monoclonal antibody (mAb) that selectively binds to CD73 and inhibits the enzymatic production of adenosine. Adenosine exerts its immunosuppressive effects on various immune cells via the adenosine 2A receptor (A2AR). AZD4635 is a potent, selective A2AR antagonist that inhibits this signaling pathway. Osimertinib is a potent and selective inhibitor of EGFRm, including the T790M resistance mutation. We hypothesize that novel combinations of targeted and immunotherapeutic agents targeting the adenosine pathway will be well tolerated and lead to increased antitumor activity in subjects with EGFRm NSCLC.

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      This is a multi-arm, open-label, multicenter, phase 1b/2 study (NCT03381274) consisting of 2 parts. In Part 1, the safety and tolerability of oleclumab in combination with either osimertinib (Arm A) or AZD4635 (Arm B) will be evaluated, and a recommended phase 2 dose for each combination will be identified. In Part 2, the safety, tolerability, and preliminary antitumor activity will be evaluated. In both parts, patients will be allocated to treatment arms based upon their EGFRm status and their prior therapy. For Part 2, the primary objective of antitumor activity will be assessed by objective response according to RECIST v1.1. Key secondary objectives include additional evaluation of clinical activity, the pharmacokinetic profiles of oleclumab, osimertinib, and AZD4635, and the evaluation of oleclumab immunogenicity. Additional treatment arms may be added as the study progresses. The study is open for enrollment and recruitment is ongoing, with a planned enrollment of up to approximately 98 patients.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      Section not applicable

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      Section not applicable

      6f8b794f3246b0c1e1780bb4d4d5dc53

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