Virtual Library

  • +

    ES05 - Collaboration Between Stakeholders to Improve Lung Cancer Research (ID 773)

    • Event: WCLC 2018
    • Type: Educational Session
    • Track: Advocacy
    • Presentations: 4
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/25/2018, 15:15 - 16:45, Room 205 AC
    • +

      ES05.01 - Linking the Stakeholders: Can Patient Groups, Clinical Researchers and the Pharmaceutical Industry Collaborate to Accelerate Research? (ID 11370)

      15:15 - 15:35  |  Presenting Author(s): Janet Freeman-Daily

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

    • +

      ES05.02 - Can Patient Groups and Regulatory Bodies Work Together to Make Clinical Research Easier? (ID 11371)

      15:35 - 15:55  |  Presenting Author(s): Andrea Ferris

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

    • +

      ES05.03 - Discrepancies and Sustainable Access to Innovative Therapies: Transforming Patient Experience in to Patient Voice (ID 11372)

      15:55 - 16:15  |  Presenting Author(s): Jesme Fox

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

    • +

      ES05.04 - Challenges and Solutions in Engaging with the Health Technology Assessment Process in Canada (ID 11373)

      16:15 - 16:35  |  Presenting Author(s): Christina Sit

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

  • +

    MA07 - Towards Survivorship: The Landscape, Supports and Barriers (ID 904)

    • Event: WCLC 2018
    • Type: Mini Oral Abstract Session
    • Track: Advocacy
    • Presentations: 12
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/24/2018, 13:30 - 15:00, Room 205 AC
    • +

      MA07.01 - No Longer Outliers: Understanding the Needs of Long-Term Lung Cancer Survivors (ID 12955)

      13:30 - 13:35  |  Presenting Author(s): Maureen Rigney  |  Author(s): Jennifer C King, Andrew Ciupek

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background

      Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in most developed and developing countries. But people do survive, sometimes for many years. Those diagnosed with lung cancer experience higher levels of distress and have greater unmet physical and emotional needs compared with other types of cancer. But what of long-term survivors?

      Globally, The Cancer Atlas reported an estimated 1,878,000 people were living with lung cancer in 2012. With the introduction of screening and rapid treatment advancements, that number is only expected to increase. Are we prepared to meet the long term and late effects of lung cancer? First, we must better understand the experiences and identified needs of long-term survivors.

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      820 people responded to a 120 question online survey that was distributed via social media and targeted outreach. 471 identified as lung cancer patients/survivors and 349 as loved ones. 21% of survivor-respondents indicated they had been diagnosed 5+ years prior.

      Queried on treatment and smoking histories, long-term survivors identified their most prevalent and problematic symptoms and side effects experienced during treatment, shortly after treatment ended and at 5+ years post-diagnosis. They also answered questions regarding treatment decision-making and palliative care discussions and provision of post-treatment survivorship plans.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      74% of long-term survivors had surgery, 43% had experienced a recurrence and 5% had participated in a clinical trial. None were current smokers.

      The most common (and problematic) late and long term symptoms and side effects were shortness of breath (39%), fatigue (28%) and anxiety (24%). Memory problems were also rated as common (27%).

      Long-term survivors indicated that during treatment, physical side effects were most problematic but post-treatment and long-term, emotional effects were more difficult. Financial issues were also more problematic 5+ years after treatment compared with other time periods. Both discussions of palliative care and provision of survivorship care plans were rare.

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      Long-term lung cancer survivors were once considered ouliers but today those diagnosed are increasingly living five years and longer. How do the late and long-term physical effects of lung cancer and its treatments differ from survivors of other types of cancer? How do long-term survivors manage stigma and survivor guilt? What physical and emotional support and services do they need? This survey provides initial insights into the physical. emotional and financial effects of living longer with lung cancer but more research is needed to allow us to more fully understand how we can support our long-term survivors.

      6f8b794f3246b0c1e1780bb4d4d5dc53

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

    • +

      MA07.02 - Line of Therapy and Patient Preferences Treating Lung Cancer: A Discrete-Choice Experiment (ID 14107)

      13:35 - 13:40  |  Presenting Author(s): Andrea Ferris  |  Author(s): John F.P. Bridges, Upal Basu Roy, Ellen Janssen

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background

      Patient preferences now play an important role in cancer research, regulatory science, and value assessment. While there is a growing literature exploring the preference of patients with lung cancer, few studies have explored how preferences vary with patients’ treatment experience. We sought to quantify patient preferences for the benefits and risks of therapy and explore how they vary across line of treatment.

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      Preferences were estimated using a discrete choice experiment (DCE) developed in partnership with a patient and stakeholder advisory boards. A D-optimal experimental design was used to generate 3 blocks of 9 choice tasks spanning five attributes: progression-free survival (PFS), short-term side effects, long-term side effects, risk of developing late-onset side effects, and mode of administration – each defined across 3 relevant levels. A diverse sample was recruited via email sent to the LUNGevity lung cancer patient database and via social media. A choice mode was estimated use a conditional logistic regression where the dependent variable was the respondents preferred treatment in each profile. The relative attribute importance (conditioned on the chosen attribute levels) was then compared across the respondents’ self-reported line of treatment.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      In total we had 350 eligible respondents, of which 279 (80%) completed as least on DCE task of which 3% did not receive a pharmacotherapy, 39% received first line therapy, and 58% had two or more lines of theory. As with previous studies, PFS was the most important attribute for patients and was similarly valued (P=0.406) among first- and later (second lines and more) lines of treatment (33.4% v 33.8%). Patients on first-line treatment placed great emphasis (P<0.001) on long-term side (18.9% v 14.1%) and late onset side effects (15.3% v 10.3%), but less emphasis (P<0.001) on short-term side effects (27.8% v 29.8 %) and mode of administration (4.6% v 12.0%) than those on later lines.

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      Population estimate of patient preference remain important, but more effort is needed to understand how patient preference vary across patient with different backgrounds and treatment experiences. We show that line of treatment does not effect how patients value time, but their experience may have an impact on treatment characteristics. Latent class analysis may allow for the identification of groups with similar preferences that could allow for multivariate analyses to explain preference heterogeneity.

      6f8b794f3246b0c1e1780bb4d4d5dc53

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

    • +

      MA07.03 - Attitudes to Lung Cancer in Europe: Findings from a Global Consumer Survey (ID 12579)

      13:40 - 13:45  |  Presenting Author(s): Jesme Fox  |  Author(s): Aoife McNamara, Maureen Rigney, Greg Manuel, Sarah Winstone

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background

      If lung cancer is diagnosed early, patients’ chances of successful treatment are increased. Stigma
      around lung cancer, as a tobacco-related cancer, can discourage patients from talking to their doctor
      about potential symptoms. In 2017, the GLCC commissioned Populus to undertake an international
      consumer survey in each of the 25 countries of the GLCC members.

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      1,000 adults, in 16 European countries, participated via an online survey in July 2017. To assess
      attitudes to lung cancer, they were told that lung cancer is mainly caused by smoking and other
      tobacco products. They were then asked the extent to which they agreed or disagreed with the
      statement: “I have less sympathy for people with lung cancer than for people with other cancers.”

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      One in five (20%) people in Europe agreed that they have less sympathy for people with lung cancer
      than other forms of cancer (Chart 1). There was variation between countries with 30% of people in
      Portugal agreeing they have less sympathy in comparison to only 17% agreeing in Denmark, the
      Netherlands, Norway, Russia, Slovenia and Spain. Men in Europe are generally less sympathetic
      than women, and those aged over 55 are most sympathetic. In addition, there was a statistically
      significant correlation between those countries with lower cigarette consumption and people agreeing
      that they have less sympathy for people with lung cancer.

      Chart 1: European attitudes to lung cancer

      glcc - european attitudes - chart 1.png

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      Everyone - no matter what the cause of their cancer - deserves to have high quality treatment and
      care. The persistent and varied levels of stigma associated with lung cancer across Europe needs to
      be addressed, so that people experiencing symptoms are not discouraged from seeking early
      intervention.

      6f8b794f3246b0c1e1780bb4d4d5dc53

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

    • +

      MA07.04 - Discussant - MA 07.01, MA 07.02, MA 07.03 (ID 14596)

      13:45 - 14:00  |  Presenting Author(s): Kim Norris

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

    • +

      MA07.05 - Psychosocial Needs and Programs of Cancer Patients/Survivors and Their Relatives: Unmet Needs from an International Study (ID 12062)

      14:00 - 14:05  |  Presenting Author(s): Csaba László Dégi  |  Author(s): Samantha Serpentini, Savita Goswami

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background

      In consideration of the dynamic nature of cancer patients’ needs, systematic understanding of their unmet needs from a socio-ecological perspective may be essential as the patients’ needs and available services are likely to vary by different healthcare systems in different countries. To investigate the role of geographical influence in cancer patients’ unmet needs, this study seeks to compare the unmet needs of and available programs for cancer patients/survivors and their family members by different types of healthcare systems across different countries.

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      The IPOS Survivorship Online Survey is distributed to international and regional Psycho-Oncology organization members, which covers countries in six continents. Survey participants’ countries where they practice/research will be categorized into four groups by the types of healthcare system: Beveridge Model, Bismarck Model, National Health Insurance Model, and Out-of-Pocket Model.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      With estimated survey to be completed by August 30th, 2018, repeated measures ANOVA will be employed to test differences in patients’ unmet needs by the four healthcare system groups, separately for patients’ unmet needs and their family caregivers’. Differences by individual countries will also be explored.

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      Findings will provide a global overview and a specific knowledge of the geografical differences in the psychosocial unmet needs and psycho-oncological programs for cancer patients/survivors and their family members/caregivers. Findings will also guide how to prioritize areas of cancer care that require improvement in psycho-oncology interventions and practices; and to highlight critical aspects for delivering quality care that vary by healthcare systems.

      6f8b794f3246b0c1e1780bb4d4d5dc53

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

    • +

      MA07.06 - Telephonic Communication In Palliative Care For Better Management Of Terminal Cancer Patients In Rural India -  An NGO Based Approach.  (ID 11905)

      14:05 - 14:10  |  Presenting Author(s): Nabanita Mandal

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background

      Due to financial incapability and absence of manpower poor families often fail to carry their advanced cancer patients to the nodal centres. This pilot study will explore whether communication by mobile phone can lessen this burden.

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      Initially a plan was generated regarding management of an advanced cancer patient in a nodal centre at District Head Quarter. Subsequently every two week a trained social worker attached to nodal centre will follow up and give necessary advice and emotional support to the patients and their families through their registered mobile phone number. Patient’s family were also encouraged to communicate with the team by phone in case of fresh complain and urgency in between.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      Since initiation in January 2017, 210 cancer patients were contacted by mobile phone every two weeks to enquire about their difficulties. In 76% of the situation trained social workers could give necessary advice by phone regarding management of their physical symptoms. Moreover patient’s family were really overwhelmed by the emotional support offered by the team over phone. Only 24% of cancer patients has to attend the nodal centre for expert advice from Palliative Care specialists.

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      This novel approach helped
      * In providing regular physical and emotional support to the patients and their families.

      * In significantly reducing the financial and manpower problems of carrying patients to the nodal units.
      * In improve the quality of life of patients by continuous guidance.


      More and more team members can take help of this new strategy for better communication and uninterrupted care.

      6f8b794f3246b0c1e1780bb4d4d5dc53

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

    • +

      MA07.07 - Identifying the Severity of Psychosocial Symptoms Among Patients Diagnosed with Lung Cancer. Do We Really Need Emotional Support Groups? (ID 13701)

      14:10 - 14:15  |  Presenting Author(s): Arooj Fatima  |  Author(s): Syed Sammar Abbas Zaidi

      • Abstract
      • Slides

      Background

      Lung cancer is the second most common cancer among men and women. Most of the lung cancers are diagnosed at later stages among those patients who are underprivileged. The diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer is a continuous emotional distress for both patient and their family. We aim to identify the severity of depression, emotional distress, stress and mental fatigue among those patients who are diagnosed with lung cancer .

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      A cross sectional study was conducted in Shaukat Khanum Hospital, Lahore from March 2014 to April 2015. Exclusion and Inclusion criteria were made. 150 were enrolled in the study. Socio demographic characteristics were evaluated using Beck Depression Inventory and socio demographic form. Severity of depression was estimated by using Hamilton D (HAM-D). Various variables were analysed including parent’s age, level of education, socioeconomic status, gender and number of children.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      68% of the participants exhibited severe range of depression. 27% showed moderate depression where as 5% participants were showing the mild range of depression. An inverse co relation was found between educational status, occupational status (paid or unpaid), their marital status, socioeconomic family status and depression. Women 71% were found be more depressed than males.

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      We concluded that majority of patients from psychosocial symptoms particularly depression and it is mainly associated with some factors. There is need to incorporate patients into the diagnosis and treatment process so that we can over come the effects of depression on the health outcomes of patients diagnosed with lung cancer. This can only be possible through appropriate education and emotional support programmes.

      6f8b794f3246b0c1e1780bb4d4d5dc53

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

    • +

      MA07.08 - Discussant - MA 07.05, MA 07.06, MA 07.07 (ID 14597)

      14:15 - 14:30  |  Presenting Author(s): Jennifer C King

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

    • +

      MA07.09 - Willingness to Perform Multiple Biopsies to Improve Quality of Lung Cancer Care: Understanding the Oncologists’ Perspective (ID 14096)

      14:30 - 14:35  |  Presenting Author(s): Upal Basu Roy  |  Author(s): Margery Jacobson, Andrea Ferris

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background

      Biomarker testing of advanced-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) at the time of diagnosis is required to determine if a patient will benefit from a targeted therapy or immunotherapy. A patient may, however, need additional biopsies (rebiopsy) if the cancer recurs to determine the next line of therapy or to determine eligibility for a new drug or participation in a clinical trial. A LUNGevity study, conducted with 340 patients, revealed that patients were willing to undergo rebiopsies if that meant access to additional treatment options at the time of recurrence. However, only 36% of patients reported that their doctors recommended repeat biopsies at progression.

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      To understand this patient-physician communications gap, we conducted an IRB-approved semi-structured survey-based study of 130 oncologists from academic research centers, community cancer centers, and private practice.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      Of the 130 oncologists surveyed,

      - Ninety percent of oncologists reported recommending a rebiopsy to their patients. However, when stratified by advanced-stage patient volume, oncologists with higher advanced-stage patient volumes reported higher rebiopsy and testing rates than those with low volumes (95% vs. 78%, p<0.05). Only 29% of the oncologists prescribed a rebiopsy in the past one year.

      - Major barriers to rebiopsy reported by oncologists included cost/reimbursement of a rebiopsy and treatment delay for 2nd- or subsequent lines of therapy

      - Among the types of biomarker testing performed at the time of progression, oncologists were more likely to prescribe testing for biomarkers with approved treatments (driver mutations – 94%, PD-L1 – 85%) unlike biomarkers for treatments in clinical development (43%) (p<0.05).

      - A forward linear regression analysis revealed that positive predictors of rebiopsy included treatment at a NCI Designated Cancer Center, while treatment at a community cancer center or private practice, presence of driver mutations at the time of diagnosis, and performance status of patient were negative predictors of rebiopsy

      - When presented with specific treatment scenarios for biomarkers (EGFR and ALK) that have 2nd-line treatment options, oncologists differed in their approach, suggesting a need for oncologist education about rebiopsying and subsequent biomarker testing

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      Our study demonstrates that rebiopsy practices vary by practice settings and volume of advanced-stage lung cancer patients. Even when rebiopsies are prescribed, a comprehensive biomarker profile of the tumor may not be obtained, due to variations in tests requested. A major implication is the need for appropriate oncologists’ education to ensure practice change for delivery of optimal care to lung cancer patients.

      6f8b794f3246b0c1e1780bb4d4d5dc53

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

    • +

      MA07.10 - Utilizing a Personalized Navigation Program to Identify Barriers and Increase Clinical Trial Participation Among Lung Cancer Patients (ID 13482)

      14:35 - 14:40  |  Presenting Author(s): Andrew Ciupek  |  Author(s): Tara Perloff, Achintya Jaitly, Jennifer C King

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background

      Only about 5% of cancer patients participate in clinical trials. We previously conducted a survey of U.S. lung cancer patients and found that only 22% reported discussing clinical trials with their oncologist at the time of making treatment decisions. We hypothesized that a personalized navigation program could both increase rates of trial discussion and identify barriers to participation among lung cancer patients.

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      We asked callers to Lung Cancer Alliance's 1-800 support line if they had considered clinical trial participation and referred willing callers to a navigator for further discussion. Navigators provided basic clinical trial education and a personalized list of trial matches. Patients were encouraged to discuss these trials with their treating oncologist. Navigators then regularly followed up with participants, via email or phone, at two to four-week intervals, to offer further support and collect outcomes information.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      We referred sixty callers to a navigator. Only 43% of callers reported a prior clinical trials conversation with their provider. Patients who had not started treatment or were on first-line treatment reported lower discussion rates (30%) than those on later treatment lines (60%). Among patients with follow up, 13 of 20 patients who had not discussed trials with their provider reported doing so after navigation. Ten of eleven patients that had a previous trial conversation initiated an additional one. Primary reasons given for not talking discussing after navigation were having stable disease on a current treatment or waiting for a clinical result. Ten patients reported contacting a trial. Primary reasons for not contacting a trial after discussion were disease progression, choosing a standard of care alternative, or waiting for a clinical result. Four patients have enrolled on a trial. Two patients were determined ineligible for a trial they approached for not meeting listed eligibility criteria and two for reasons not appearing in public trial information.

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      We identified barriers throughout the clinical trials consideration and enrollment process. One set of barriers was related to care coordination, as exemplified by low rates of trial discussion during early stages of treatment and patient reports of delayed trial consideration when currently receiving treatment or waiting on a clinical result. Communication of trial information was another area presenting barriers, as exemplified by exclusion of patients from trials for reasons not readily apparent from public trial information. Improving integration of trial discussion during care and ensuring availability of accurate, updated trial information may be essential to increase trial participation.

      6f8b794f3246b0c1e1780bb4d4d5dc53

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

    • +

      MA07.11 - Drug Price Comparison in Advanced Lung Cancer – High Cost Prices is Accompanied by Patient Benefits? (ID 14015)

      14:40 - 14:45  |  Presenting Author(s): Luciene Bonan

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background

      In our recent decade we are seen new drugs coming up with high speed development to attend personalized conditions in lung cancer treatment. After the first TKI for EGFR mutation, many other target drugs such as TKI for ALK/ROS1 alteration, third-generation EGFR TKI, anti-PD-1/PD-L1 immunotherapies bring together an improvement in survival with better quality of life than chemotherapies. But this new specialty drugs are also testing the affordability of the market with new launched ceiling prices. Frequently, their prices have been settled down in a context of an unmet condition appeal rather than the truly health benefits. In pricing it is a common practice to use the external reference price between countries to align the prices based on international market. But if the first price is launched (frequently in USA) in countries that don’t use metrics based on evidence or clinical benefits, the price plateau could be replicated even without necessarily deserving this price. The objective of this presentation is to show the price comparison of drugs included in TKI class and immunotherapy class between high and middle-income countries. Then to compare the cost-treatment of therapies commonly used in advanced lung cancer and their magnitude of clinical benefit.

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      All local currencies were converted to US dollars using PPP factor. The magnitude of effect was evaluated based on the ESMO Magnitude of Clinical Benefit Score.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      USA has the highest drug price followed by Brazil, especially in recent launched drugs. Costs of advanced lung cancer treatment significantly increase 5 times more when compared first-generated TKI and new generation TKI. Immunotherapy for second line costs 6 times more than first line with EGFR TKI and could cost more than 7 to 130 times the chemotherapy with docetaxel. Clinical benefits do not reach the same scale.

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      The market of anticancer drug increasing 10% annually, but clinical benefits don’t advance in the same compass. Specialized drugs come into the market with pricing warrant of unmeet conditions, but if we think in precision medicine all new drug-target biomarker could be priced higher because it will cover a rare or unmet condition. In the context of precision medicine, is it fear a patient pays more because he has a different biomarker for the same clinical condition? If countries do not start to evaluate and pricing drugs based on value, market strategists will continue to test the ceiling price that health systems can(not) afford.

      6f8b794f3246b0c1e1780bb4d4d5dc53

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

    • +

      MA07.12 - Discussant - MA 07.09, MA 07.10, MA 07.11 (ID 14598)

      14:45 - 15:00  |  Presenting Author(s): Govind Babu Kanakasetty

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

  • +

    MA17 - New Methods to Improve Lung Cancer Patients Outcomes (ID 918)

    • Event: WCLC 2018
    • Type: Mini Oral Abstract Session
    • Track: Nursing and Allied Professionals
    • Presentations: 12
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/25/2018, 13:30 - 15:00, Room 205 AC
    • +

      MA17.01 - A Sense of Understanding and Belonging When Life Is at Stake – Operable Lung Cancer Patients’ Lived Experiences of Participation in Exercise (ID 13162)

      13:30 - 13:35  |  Presenting Author(s): Malene Missel  |  Author(s): Mai Nanna Schoenau, Britt Borregaard

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background

      Exercise has been introduced to improve physical capacity and quality of life and to reduce symptoms and side effects of treatment in surgically treated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. The effects of an exercise programme for this patient group has been tested in a randomized controlled trial – the PROLUCA study. The questions though, of how patients experience participation in group-based exercise studies and the impact of the shared community with fellow patients has not been previously examined. The objective was to explore lived experiences and social benefits among patients with operable NSCLC who participated in an exercise programme (the PROLUCA study) post-surgery.

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      Nineteen patients enrolled in an exercise intervention two weeks post-surgery participated in qualitative interviews at three time points. A phenomenological hermeneutical approach comprised the epistemological stance and the methodological basis was Ricoeur’s narrative philosophy. The goal of the analysis and interpretation was to provide descriptions that captured the meaning of the lived experiences of the patients.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      Patients included in this qualitative study had a mean age of 63 years (range 48-75), 58% were female, and 68% was retired. Eighty-four percent had performance status 0 (WHO) and almost all patients were used to some kind of physical activity. The analysis revealed social benefits of taking part in the group-based exercise intervention. The patients experienced themselves as part of a community, and the physical exercise intervention was significant in terms of the patients’ social capital. In this sense, patients gained access to resources that derived from human interaction in the exercise group, and their illness and treatment became easier to manage when shared with others in the same situation. The exercise intervention helped to create a community for patients after lung cancer surgery, and the patients experienced a feeling of belonging and equality with the other participants.

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      The group based exercise intervention created opportunities for mutual understanding between patients, making illness and treatment easier to manage. The patients experienced support to gain renewed balance in life during the exercise intervention in the interaction with peers in the group. It is relevant to inform operable NSCLC patients about the potential community of understanding and belonging in group-based exercise interventions.

      6f8b794f3246b0c1e1780bb4d4d5dc53

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

    • +

      MA17.02 - Early Accrual to a Precision Lung Cancer Survivorship Intervention: The Kentucky LEADS Collaborative Lung Cancer Survivorship Care Program (ID 14179)

      13:35 - 13:40  |  Presenting Author(s): Jamie L Studts  |  Author(s): Jessica L Burris, Michael A Andrykowski, Tara Schapmire, Barbara Head, Maureen Rigney, Angela Meredith Criswell, Susanne M Arnold, Allyson R Yates, Courtney Blair, Amy Christian

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background

      Recent advances in early detection and treatment of lung cancer have created a need for survivorship care interventions to reduce the psychosocial and symptom burden of lung cancer, but few interventions address the unique experience of lung cancer survivors and their caregivers. Leveraging shared decision making and motivational interviewing, the Kentucky LEADS Collaborative developed a precision psychosocial intervention addressing the unique experiences and challenges of individuals diagnosed with lung cancer and their caregivers. This sub-study describes the demographic, diagnostic, and psychosocial characteristics of the initial participants in the Kentucky LEADS Collaborative Lung Cancer Survivorship Care Program.

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      Participants include 61 lung cancer survivors across 9 lung cancer care sites in Kentucky, USA. Data were drawn from baseline surveys of demographic characteristics, disease/treatment information, symptom burden, psychosocial functioning and quality of life administered to lung cancer survivors and caregivers enrolled in the single-arm intervention trial.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      Of the first 61 LC survivors enrolled, 32 had a caregiver join them as participants in the intervention (53%). Participants had a mean age of 62 years. Approximately 20% of LC survivors did not have a caregiver available to participate, and 27% declined to invite a caregiver join the program. Most participating caregivers were spouses (63%), but siblings (10%) and children (19%) were also included. Most survivors were female (66%), Caucasian (97%), and covered by health insurance (95%), and 59% were married or living in a committed relationship. Most participants had been diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer (84%) and late-stage disease (IIIB-IV; 53%). Most participants had a history of smoking (95%); 30% had smoked within the past 30 days, and 29% were current smokers. Among current smokers, participants reported very high levels of quit planning (9.23±2.77) and quitting confidence (9.14±2.89). Finally, approximately 55% reported clinically significant distress, with a mean level of distress of 3.98 (2.99) on a scale from 0-10.

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      Early accrual to the trial has exceeded expectations. Most survivors had advanced disease and reported significant distress. A substantial minority continued to use tobacco. Data suggest that modifications made to the survivorship approach emphasizing empathy and patient preference may help improve intervention acceptability and feasibility. Subsequent analyses will evaluate the impact of the intervention on quality of life, psychosocial functioning, and symptom burden. Data will also be collected regarding acceptability of the intervention and potential program changes to optimize benefits.

      6f8b794f3246b0c1e1780bb4d4d5dc53

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

    • +

      MA17.03 - Shared Decision-Making for Patients with Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (ID 12426)

      13:40 - 13:45  |  Presenting Author(s): Mette Kargo Jensen  |  Author(s): Karin Piil, Gitte Fredberg Persson, Seppo W Langer, Mette Vinter, Katrina Pitt Winther, Susanne Friis-Haché, Mette Pøhl

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background

      Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in the world and more than half of the patients have metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis. Although, treatment options are developing rapidly, most patients are facing a poor prognosis. The role of 3rd or 4th line treatment with chemotherapy remains controversial with sparse evidence of efficacy. Therefore, the patient’s preferences become central. Shared decision-making enables the patients to be actively involved in choosing the treatment option that best reflects both medical evidence and individual preferences.

      This study examines how patients with lung cancer and their relatives are empowered and supported when they have to make informed choices regarding 3rd or 4th line of treatment. The aim was to develop a model for shared decision-making and to test decision aid tools that enable a collaborative process that takes into account the best available scientific evidence, as well as the patient's values and preferences.

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      Patients diagnosed with advanced non-small cell lung cancer, their relatives and the health care professionals were involved in the process that included: 1) Multidisciplinary workshops and workshops with patients and relatives, 2) Training course in communication on existential issues and shared decision-making for health care professionals, 3) Designing and testing five decision aid tools, 4) Creating a Podcast and 5) Evaluation by patient satisfaction surveys.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      Three strategic focus areas were identified: 1) The meaningful service, 2) considerations in end-of-life care and 3) patient involvement in decision making. The patient reported quality of communication was increased during the study period. The patient satisfaction surveys (n=77 baseline) and (n=60 final evaluation) demonstrated statistical significant improvements from baseline to final evaluation in regard to:1) involving patients in the treatment decisions to the extent they prefer (Pearson Chi-Square, P=0.048) and 2) encouraging patients to ask questions (Pearson Chi-Square, P=0.008). The study improved the health care professionals understanding of the importance of incorporating patients in shared decision-making processes in clinical practice. However, some barriers for implementation were identified, such as changing established behaviour among health care professionals.

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      The findings indicate that decision aid tools are useful and related to significant changes in patient experience of the quality of communication. We suggest investigating the feasibility and potential concerns of integrating these tools to a larger extend in clinical practice.

      6f8b794f3246b0c1e1780bb4d4d5dc53

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

    • +

      MA17.04 - Discussant - MA 17.01, MA 17.02, MA 17.03 (ID 14648)

      13:45 - 14:00  |  Presenting Author(s): Anne Fraser

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

    • +

      MA17.05 - Development of a Telephone Clinic for Patients Undergoing Long Term Follow-Up After Thoracic Surgery (ID 12598)

      14:00 - 14:05  |  Presenting Author(s): Jenny Mitchell  |  Author(s): Calum Buchanan, Sarah Malone, Francesco Di Chiara, Dionisios Stavroulias, Elizabeth Belcher

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background

      Patients undergoing long term follow-up after lung cancer surgery in our institution follow an imaging based follow-up programme. Protocol led CT imaging followed by an out-patient appointment is undertaken every 6 months for two years after surgery then annually until year 5. Feedback from patients indicated they find two trips to the hospital burdensome and they frequently requested results of surveillance imaging over the telephone. Limited capacity in the thoracic surgery clinics led to long waits for an appointment to be informed of imaging results. To address these issues, we developed a model of nurse led telephone follow-up after surveillance imaging.

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      A proposal to hold one telephone clinic per week was made to commissioners in the autumn of 2016. Following approval, the telephone clinic commenced in April 2017. Patients are triaged by the specialist nurse when CT results are available and allocated to the telephone clinic if appropriate. They are given a timed appointment and the telephone number they will be contacted on is confirmed prior to the appointment. A database is completed during the appointment, a record of the consultation is made in both paper and electronic patient records and a letter is sent to the GP and other teams who have contact with the patient. Patients with significant abnormalities on CT imaging are referred for discussion by the multidisciplinary team and seen in a face to face clinic.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      In the first twelve months (April 2017 to March 2018) there were 254 patient appointments in 51 telephone clinics. Average call length is 10 minutes with a range of 3 to 22 minutes. One patient scheduled for a telephone appointment was not contactable at the appointed time (0.4%). Satisfaction with the clinic is high with 98% of patients requesting their next follow-up appointment in the telephone clinic. Clinic capacity was increased at reduced cost to commissioners as a telemedicine appointment is charged at £25.34 compared to £70.16 for a face to face appointment.

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      Early results suggest nurse led telephone clinics are an effective way of providing follow-up to patients on an imaging based follow-up programme after surgery. They are well received by patients. We aim to introduce an online tool to objectively assess symptoms in this patient group. Further evaluation of patient experience in this clinic would be beneficial, along with an evaluation of the impact of introduction of telephone follow-up on the rest of the service.

      6f8b794f3246b0c1e1780bb4d4d5dc53

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

    • +

      MA17.06 - The Specialist Lung Cancer Nurse and Self-Management for People Living with Lung Cancer: A Model of Engagement (ID 13060)

      14:05 - 14:10  |  Presenting Author(s): Vanessa Nicole Brunelli  |  Author(s): Patsy Yates, Carol Windsor

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background

      There is increasing evidence that patient self-management strategies, used as adjuncts to traditional pharmacological interventions, can improve symptom control for people living with lung cancer. While it is acknowledged that the specialist lung cancer nurse (SLCN) is well positioned in the multidisciplinary team to facilitate patient self-management education (PSME), limited guidance is available to SLCNs on this role.

      The aim of this study was to understand the knowledge and skills required of SLCNs to facilitate PSME and how such skills might best be developed. The intent was to develop a pedagogy that enhances SLCN-patient interactions so that patients can be better supported to make self-care decisions and to act on these decisions.

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      The epistemological lens of the study drew on the sociocultural works of Vygotsky and Leontiev. Fifteen participants were purposively recruited through the Australia and New Zealand Lung Cancer Nurses Forum. The sample comprised Australian registered nurses employed at the level of clinical nurse consultant. Eligibility for the study required participants have a minimum of 5 years lung cancer nursing experience. Of the sample, the average was 13 years’ experience.

      Through individual, face to face interviews, a biographical approach to data collection focused on participants’ work and non-work lives. The theoretically informed analysis generated understanding about the salient influences on SLCN learning and how and why these influences shaped PSME.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      PSME is an inherently complex activity. Although seeking to facilitate patient learning to empower patients to self-manage, the SLCN experiences challenges in the contemporary health care environment. Entrenched power relations, professional boundaries, minimal practice guidelines and issues of resourcing of lung cancer and lung cancer nursing are key factors that shape PSME.

      A model of engagement was designed to reflect the pedagogy that underpins optimal interactions between SLCNs and patients. The model brings forth the socially situated contexts of the SLCN and patient as central to the interaction. A reflective mode of practice creates a teaching and learning environment inclusive of sociocultural and individual processes on learning and thus the mechanisms of co-constructing knowledge for the purpose of shaping patient behaviour.

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      The study assumes the strategic importance of addressing how best the SLCN workforce can support people living with lung cancer to self-manage. A key strength of the research is the focus on understanding the individual and social interrelatedness of SLCN learning for the purpose of enhancing educational interactions in complex environments with people living with lung cancer.

      6f8b794f3246b0c1e1780bb4d4d5dc53

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

    • +

      MA17.07 - Nurse-Led Telehealth Clinic in Treatment Monitoring and Follow Up (ID 12335)

      14:10 - 14:15  |  Presenting Author(s): Sarah Louise Cubbin  |  Author(s): Michael Brada

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background

      A clinical consultation is usually physician led and traditionally carried out in a direct person-person interaction in an outpatient clinic. The alternative is replacing it through electronic means via telehealth. This has already been exploited as a phone consultation and is gaining momentum as a video based consultation although it has not been widely introduced into oncology.

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      The aim was to ascertain the acceptance of the video consulting technology in real clinical settings and the effectiveness of video consultation in replacing conventional consultation.

      Eligible patients who attended a pre-existing nurse led clinic completed a checklist to ensure access to appropriate IT equipment. Those able to participate were asked to replace two nurse led appointments with nurse led teleheath appointments using iKonsult video consultation platform. After each consultation a satisfaction questionnaire was completed.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      Patients were recruited from a protocolised nurse led clinic for mutation driven NSCLC on oral tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI). 42 patients were approached over a three month period; only 6 agreed and were followed up via the telehealth platform. 4 patients considered it as a possibility, 4 did not feel confident and 3 did not have the correct equipment. The remaining patients cited numerous reasons for not taking up this service.

      In the satisfaction analysis of 17 initial telemedicine consultations 5/6 patients (81%) were very satisfied with telemedicine follow up. 4 patients (66%) found the platform extremely easy and 2 (34%) easy to use.

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      On treatment monitoring of oral TKI therapy could be effectively carried out using video consultation platform reducing the number of hospital visits. The consultations provided necessary information and allowed for adequate clinical assessment. However the initial take up rate is low mostly due to patient reluctance rather than unavailable technology. The overall feedback from participants was very positive and accepting of the service. The iKonsult video consultation is being introduced into other oncology settings.

      6f8b794f3246b0c1e1780bb4d4d5dc53

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

    • +

      MA17.08 - Discussant - MA 17.05, MA 17.06, MA 17.07 (ID 14649)

      14:15 - 14:30  |  Presenting Author(s): Melissa Culligan

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

    • +

      MA17.09 - Remote Symptom Reporting for Tele-Nursing Team in Thoracic Oncology Clinics: Environmental Scan and Stakeholder Engagement (ID 12226)

      14:30 - 14:35  |  Presenting Author(s): Simranjit Kooner  |  Author(s): Jennifer Harris, Suheon Lee, Catherine De Guia, Doris Howell, Geoffrey Liu

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background

      50+% of cancer-related toxicities are under-reported. A real-time Remote (i.e., at-home) Symptom Reporting (RSR) system could help patients seek help when symptoms exceed thresholds, mitigating unplanned clinic/emergency room visits. A RSR system for solid-tumor patients undergoing chemotherapy is associated with improved health-related quality of life and survival (Basch et al, 2017). Adapting RSR into the thoracic cancer clinic environment requires assessments of potential implementation barriers, and tailoring of the RSR-system.

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      Over a five month period, we performed an environmental scan to determine readiness of RSR implementation in our comprehensive thoracic oncology outpatient clinic. A qualitative assessment of potential RSR integration into the telephone triage environment was performed through one-on-one interviews and focus groups, followed by thematic analysis. Discussions were held with multiple stakeholders; key implementation champions were identified. We utilized the Canadian Institutes of Health Research Knowledge-to-Action Framework, Steps 2-4 as our guide.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      In the environmental scan, 125 telephone triage calls were logged over randomly-chosen days in a 6-week period. The mean ± SEM call duration was 5.4 ± 0.62 minutes. Mean time until response was 44.4 ± 3.8 minutes. Nurses spent on average 2.7 ± 0.2 minutes documenting into the electronic-patient-record. The mean duration from initial contact to completion was 24.1 ± 4.5 minutes. Resolution of the triage calls involved telephone advice alone (87%; n=109), unplanned clinic visits (6%; n=8), and emergency visits (6%; n=7).

      In the qualitative analyses, top stakeholder-identified issues were: lack of assessment standardization; wasted time transcribing paper triage notes to electronic records; and a high patient/family burden in terms on understanding when to seek help. There was universal interest in adopting a RSR system from administrative assistants, nursing administration, clinic nurses, physicians and trainees. Perceived benefits of RSR were: standardized, focused telephone assessments; tailored symptom assessments in the thoracic setting (i.e., dyspnea, coughing, hemoptysis); patient empowerment; and improved efficiency in patient contact, intra-team communication, and documentation. Key stakeholder RSR features were: a phone/web application that assesses symptom severity and indicates when to contact the triage team; one-touch feature to reach team; longitudinal symptom trend display for tele-nursing team; and embedding of the COSTaRS framework to facilitate tele-nursing interventions and documentation.

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      Integration of a RSR system integration was perceived favorably by stakeholders to increase nursing efficiency and improve health related patient outcomes, but success hinges on an identified set of key requirements.

      6f8b794f3246b0c1e1780bb4d4d5dc53

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

    • +

      MA17.10 - The Use of Technology in the Delivery of Supportive Care of Lung Cancer Patients After Treatment (ID 11186)

      14:35 - 14:40  |  Presenting Author(s): Pamela Rose  |  Author(s): Heather Quail, John McPhelim, Mhairi Simpson

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background

      The NHS Lanarkshire Lung Cancer Project is part of the Transforming Care after Treatment (TCAT) programme.

      During phase one 58 patients participated in the project. 88% of patients opted for a telephone consultation, which was more time effective taking only on average 20 minutes compared to 48 minutes for a face to face consultation. 90% of patients rated the service as excellent and a review of additional Patient Reported Outcome Measures demonstarted an improvement in overall quality of life.

      Further funding was secured as part of Phase 3 of the TCAT programme allowing for continued testing.

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      Between November 2017 – May 2018 lung cancer patients living in Lanarkshire were offered two monthly SPARC assessments on completion of treatment . This was followed up with and a telephone consultation from a lung cancer clinical nurse specialist, the provision of a personalised care plan and access to self-management information. The choice of an electronic or paper SPARC assessment was offered.

      To support the evaluation a Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy – Lung (FACT-L), Memorial Symptoms Assessment Scale (MSAS) and Supportive Care Needs Survey Long-Form 59 (SCNS) were completed prior to their first and after their final assessment. A patient experience questionnaire was also provided on completion of their final assessment.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      24 patients participated in phase 3. 53% opted to complete their assessment electronically with 47% preferring the paper option.

      15 patients (63%) completed both assessments resulting in a total of 582 concerns being identified. Data analysis of these patients shows a 27% reduction in concerns with the number of high concerns falling by 62% between the first and second assessment. The average length of time for telephone review remained similar phase one at 22 minutes ranging from 7 minutes to 55 minutes.

      Patient satisfaction in the project continued to be high with 82% rating the service as excellent and 18% as good.. Data analysis for 15 patients’ who had completed 2 FACT-L, MSAS and SCNS yielded a significant reduction in symptom burden and psychological distress with a significant improvement in quality of life.

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      Findings from this project are encouraging that this model of working is not only acceptable to patients but time efficient and clinically effective. However, a limitation of this project is its small sample size. Therefore, further work is needed to explore its transferability and cost effectiveness to allow it to be considered for implementation in standard practice.

      6f8b794f3246b0c1e1780bb4d4d5dc53

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

    • +

      MA17.11 - Multi-Centred, Prospective, Audit to Identify Readmission Causes and Complications Within 30 of Primary Lung Cancer Surgery (ID 11916)

      14:40 - 14:45  |  Presenting Author(s): Amy Kerr  |  Author(s): Maureen King, Sandra Dixon, Sarah Taylor, Alison Smith, Charlotte Merriman, Jenny Mitchell, Verity Hunter

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background

      Surgery remains the first choice of curative treatment, for patients with non-small lung cancer, the proportion of patients undergoing surgery has risen in recent years. Post-operative complications are well recognised following curative lung cancer surgery but there is limited data on readmission rates and causes . The UK Thoracic Surgery Group (TSG), a subgroup of the National Lung Cancer Forum (NLCNF) conducted a multicentre audit to assess readmission potential causes and patient experience.

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      The audit involved 6 UK thoracic surgical centres with prospective data collection over 3 months from primary lung cancer resection patients. Patients were contacted 1 month post discharge by telephone. Data collection included demographics, socioeconomic, smoking status, comorbidities, surgery, postoperative recovery, discharge satisfaction and readmission details.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      268 patients underwent thoracic surgery, the overall readmission rate was 11% (30), with variable readmission rate across the centres (range 3-24%), most readmission occurred within 7 days of discharge 47% (14) with patients being readmitted to a hospital that did not performed the procedure 43%(17). The most common cause of readmission was mainly pulmonary related with chest infections being largest cause, pain, wound infection and pneumothorax were also common. Length of stay following readmission was longer than initial surgical stay median 8 (range 0-94) vs 5 (range 2-27).Type of surgical approach had no impact on readmission. However readmission was associated with smoking, post-operative complications, discharge with drain, length of stay post-surgery and the patient’s readiness for discharge (see table 1).

      table 1.png

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      This audit provides a broad overview of the pattern and trend of readmissions rates within 30 days post discharge following lung cancer resection. Whilst not every readmission can be avoided, there is opportunity to identify and prevent patient readmission. Listening to patient’s assessment of their readiness for discharge is crucial to facilitating patient compliance with discharge and confidence in community carers.

      6f8b794f3246b0c1e1780bb4d4d5dc53

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

    • +

      MA17.12 - Discussant - MA 17.09, MA 17.10, MA 17.11 (ID 14650)

      14:45 - 15:00  |  Presenting Author(s): Mary Duffy

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

  • +

    MS26 - From Textbook to Practice Around the World (ID 804)

    • Event: WCLC 2018
    • Type: Mini Symposium
    • Track: Treatment in the Real World - Support, Survivorship, Systems Research
    • Presentations: 4
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/26/2018, 10:30 - 12:00, Room 205 AC
    • +

      MS26.01 - Translation of Clinical Data to Real World - Asia (ID 11511)

      10:30 - 10:45  |  Presenting Author(s): Dae Ho Lee

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

    • +

      MS26.02 - Translation of Clinical Data to Real World - North America (ID 11512)

      10:45 - 11:00  |  Presenting Author(s): Cheryl Ho

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

    • +

      MS26.03 - Translation of Clinical Data to Real World - Europe (ID 11513)

      11:00 - 11:15  |  Presenting Author(s): Fabrice Barlesi

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

    • +

      MS26.04 - Translation of Clinical Data to Real World - Latin America/Africa (ID 11514)

      11:15 - 11:30  |  Presenting Author(s): Luis Ubillos

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

  • +

    MS31 - Clinical Science in Mesothelioma (ID 809)

    • Event: WCLC 2018
    • Type: Mini Symposium
    • Track: Mesothelioma
    • Presentations: 5
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/26/2018, 13:30 - 15:00, Room 205 AC
    • +

      MS31.01 - Mechanisms and Targets for BAP1 Activity (ID 11535)

      13:30 - 13:45  |  Presenting Author(s): Michele Carbone

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

    • +

      MS31.02 - Clinical Implementation of BAP1 Inhibitors (ID 11536)

      13:45 - 14:00  |  Presenting Author(s): Paul Baas  |  Author(s): Laurel Schunselaar

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

    • +

      MS31.03 - Targeting the Hippo Pathway (ID 11537)

      14:00 - 14:15  |  Presenting Author(s): David Mark Jablons  |  Author(s): Gavitt A. Woodard

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

    • +

      MS31.04 - CAR-T and ADC's in MPM (ID 11538)

      14:15 - 14:30  |  Presenting Author(s): Prasad S. Adusumilli

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

    • +

      MS31.05 - Vaccination and Antibody-Based Therapy in Mesothelioma (ID 11539)

      14:30 - 14:45  |  Presenting Author(s): Joachim G.J.V. Aerts

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

  • +

    MTE04 - Comparison of Various Risk Models (Ticketed Session) (ID 814)

    • Event: WCLC 2018
    • Type: Meet the Expert Session
    • Track: Screening and Early Detection
    • Presentations: 2
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/24/2018, 07:00 - 08:00, Room 205 AC
    • +

      MTE04.01 - Comparisons of Risk Models (ID 11552)

      07:00 - 07:30  |  Presenting Author(s): Christine Berg

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

    • +

      MTE04.02 - Where Should Health Programs Set Threshold for Tailored Screening? (ID 11553)

      07:30 - 08:00  |  Presenting Author(s): James L Mulshine

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

  • +

    MTE16 - What Is Changing in the Management of Pulmonary Neuroendocrine Tumours? (Ticketed Session) (ID 829)

    • Event: WCLC 2018
    • Type: Meet the Expert Session
    • Track: Small Cell Lung Cancer/NET
    • Presentations: 2
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/25/2018, 07:00 - 08:00, Room 205 AC
    • +

      MTE16.01 - Proper Treatment of LCNEC; Chemotherapy or Targeted Therapy (ID 11579)

      07:00 - 07:30  |  Presenting Author(s): Sumitra Thongprasert

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

    • +

      MTE16.02 - The Management of Small Cell Lung Cancer following First Line Treatment Failure (ID 11580)

      07:30 - 08:00  |  Presenting Author(s): Glenwood Goss

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

  • +

    MTE19 - How I Treat Advanced Stage Thymic Malignancy Patients (Ticketed Session) (ID 826)

    • Event: WCLC 2018
    • Type: Meet the Expert Session
    • Track: Thymoma/Other Thoracic Malignancies
    • Presentations: 1
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/26/2018, 07:00 - 08:00, Room 205 AC
    • +

      MTE19.01 - How I Treat Advanced Stage Thymic Malignancy Patients (ID 11574)

      07:00 - 08:00  |  Presenting Author(s): Heather A Wakelee

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

  • +

    PC01 - Controversies in Mesothelioma (ID 840)

    • Event: WCLC 2018
    • Type: Pro-Con Session
    • Track: Mesothelioma
    • Presentations: 6
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/24/2018, 10:30 - 12:00, Room 205 AC
    • +

      PC01.01 - PRO Intrapleural Chemotherapy Is It the Future? (ID 11598)

      10:30 - 10:45  |  Presenting Author(s): Isabelle Opitz, Alessandra Curioni Fontecedro

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

    • +

      PC01.02 - CON Intrapleural Chemotherapy Is It the Future? (ID 11599)

      10:45 - 11:00  |  Presenting Author(s): David Rice

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

    • +

      PC01.03 - PRO IO in Mesothelioma Should Only Be Given on Clinical Trials (ID 11600)

      11:00 - 11:15  |  Presenting Author(s): Penelope Bradbury

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

    • +

      PC01.04 - CON in Mesothelioma Should Only Be Given on Clinical Trials (ID 11601)

      11:15 - 11:30  |  Presenting Author(s): Evan Alley

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

    • +

      PC01.05 - PRO Radiation Options: Are We SMART Enough? (ID 11602)

      11:30 - 11:45  |  Presenting Author(s): John Cho

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

    • +

      PC01.06 - CON Radiation Options: Are We SMART Enough? (ID 11603)

      11:45 - 12:00  |  Presenting Author(s): Charles B. Simone

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

  • +

    PC03 - Controversies in Management of Resectable Thymoma (ID 842)

    • Event: WCLC 2018
    • Type: Pro-Con Session
    • Track: Thymoma/Other Thoracic Malignancies
    • Presentations: 6
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/24/2018, 15:15 - 16:45, Room 205 AC
    • +

      PC03.01 - Post-Operative Radiation Therapy or NOT: PRO (ID 11608)

      15:15 - 15:25  |  Presenting Author(s): Conrad B Falkson

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

    • +

      PC03.02 - Post-Operative Radiation Therapy or NOT: CON (ID 11609)

      15:25 - 15:35  |  Presenting Author(s): Daniel Gomez

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

    • +

      PC03.04 - Debate on Standard Surgical Approaches - Minimally Invasive Thymectomy (ID 11610)

      15:45 - 15:55  |  Presenting Author(s): Shaf Keshavjee

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

    • +

      PC03.05 - Debate on Standard Surgical Approaches - Open Thymectomy (ID 11611)

      15:55 - 16:05  |  Presenting Author(s): Meinoshin Okumura

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

    • +

      PC03.07 - Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Thymic Carcinoma - YES (ID 11612)

      16:15 - 16:25  |  Presenting Author(s): Giulia Pasello

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.

    • +

      PC03.08 - Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Thymic Carcinoma - NO (ID 11613)

      16:25 - 16:35  |  Presenting Author(s): Sukhmani Kaur Padda

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      IASLC Members: To view this content or have the option to purchase this event, click here to login.
      Conference Attendees & Access Code holders: Click here to enter your Access Code. Already entered your Access Code? Please login.