Virtual Library

Start Your Search

Teng Zhou



Author of

  • +

    MA17 - Molecular Mechanisms and Therapies (ID 143)

    • Event: WCLC 2019
    • Type: Mini Oral Session
    • Track: Biology
    • Presentations: 1
    • Now Available
    • +

      MA17.10 - Lactate Transporter Blockade as a Strategy to Overcome VEGF Inhibitor-Resistance in LKB1-Deficient NSCLC (Now Available) (ID 2647)

      15:45 - 17:15  |  Author(s): Teng Zhou

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background

      STK11/LKB1 alterations are found in 20-30% of NSCLC and used to co-occur with KRAS mutations. Because LKB1 activates AMPK, many of the best known functions of LKB1 are attributed to its ability to control metabolic alterations in cells. Our laboratory have previously reported that loss of LKB1 promotes enhanced glycolysis and elevated lactate production and more recently we demonstrated that STK11/LKB1 mutations are the strongest predictors of de novo resistance to immunotherapy in NSCLC. Prior studies have revealed an association between alterations in the LKB1/AMPK pathway and worse clinical outcomes in NSCLC and in patients treated with chemotherapy and bevacizumab. Given the roles of LKB1 in the regulation of cell metabolism and resistance to immunotherapy, it is feasible that LKB1 also impacts on the response to anti-angiogenic therapies.

      Method

      Xenograft mouse models were established by subcutaneous injection of H460 cells (LKB1-deficient) and H460 LKB1-expressing in nude mice and LKR10 (KRASG12D) LKB1 wild-type (K) or LKB1- knockout (KL) into 129Svmice. Mice were randomized to vehicle or B20-4.1.1 anti-VEGF antibody. Glycolytic activity of LKB1-intact and -deficient NSCLC cells was measured by Seahorse assay. We analyzed gene expression of SLC16A3 (MCT4) by qPCR and Western blot. Genetic disruption of MCT4 in the K and KL cell lines was done using CRISPR-Cas9 and mouse models were established by subcutaneous injection into mice.

      Result

      Mice bearing LKB1-expressing H460 xenografts treated with anti-VEGF antibody showed a significant decrease in tumor volume (p<0.05) compared with their vehicle-treated counterparts. However, mice bearing LKB1-deficient H460 xenografts showed markedly reduced efficacy of anti-VEGF therapy compared with that in LKB1-expressing xenografts. Anti-VEGF therapy significantly reduced growth of LKR10 K tumors (p<0.001) but not in LKR10 KL tumors. Microvascular density was not increased in KL tumors following anti-VEGF treatment compared to K. Human isogenic LKB1-deficient cells showed a significantly increased rate of glycolysis and lactate secretion compared with cells expressing LKB1. Human and murine LKB1-deficient cells also had increased MCT4 expression compared to K cells. Immunofluorescence and RPPA analysis of tumor samples from the K and KL mouse models showed that KL tumors upregulated MCT4 protein expression compared with K tumors (p<0.0001). The genetic disruption of MCT4 KL tumors significantly improved tumor volume reduction to anti-VEGF therapies in vivo (p<0.001).

      Conclusion

      LKB1 loss is associated with increased lactate secretion and resistance to VEGF inhibition in NSCLC. The targeting of the lactate transporter MCT4 enhance the sensitivity of LKB1-deficient NSCLC to anti-VEGF therapy.

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      Only Active Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login or select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout.