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Viralkumar Bharatbhai Vaghani



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    P2.01 - Advanced NSCLC (Not CME Accredited Session) (ID 950)

    • Event: WCLC 2018
    • Type: Poster Viewing in the Exhibit Hall
    • Track:
    • Presentations: 1
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/25/2018, 16:45 - 18:00, Exhibit Hall
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      P2.01-87 - Profiling the Symptom Burden of Patients with Metastatic NSCLC Receiving Either Chemotherapy or Targeted Therapy: Real-World Data (ID 13348)

      16:45 - 18:00  |  Author(s): Viralkumar Bharatbhai Vaghani

      • Abstract
      • Slides

      Background

      An understanding of the patient experience is lacking for newly developed cancer treatments, such as targeted therapies. We profiled the patient-reported outcome (PRO)-measured symptom burden experienced by patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (mNSCLC) during 6 months of conventional chemotherapy or targeted therapy.

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      During 2017, patients with mNSCLC at a single institution were recruited and completed the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory lung cancer module (MDASI-LC) at clinic visits. The MDASI-LC assesses the severity of 13 core and 3 lung-cancer-specific symptoms and 6 interference items on 0‒10 scales (0=no symptom or interference, 10=worst imaginable symptom or complete interference). Descriptive statistics for MDASI-LC scores over 6 months of treatment were summarized. Symptom trajectories for the chemotherapy patients versus the targeted-therapy patients were compared via linear mixed-effects models.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      Of 65 patients receiving chemotherapy and 27 receiving targeted therapy, the targeted-therapy group had more women (74% vs. 49%, P=0.029) and younger patients (57.6±12.2 vs. 64.2±9.9 years, P=0.012). Before treatment, both groups reported similar symptom burden, although sadness was worse in the targeted-therapy group (2.4±1.6 vs. 0.8±1.5, P=0.021). During the first 60 days of treatment, patients receiving chemotherapy reported significant increase in pain (estimate (est)=0.03, P=0.037) and interference with walking (est=0.04, P=0.025). Compared with those receiving chemotherapy, patients receiving targeted therapy experienced significantly less severe pain (est=‒1.17, P=0.024), fatigue (est=‒1.16, P=0.019), and shortness of breath (est=‒1.23, P=0.028) and less interference with walking (est=‒1.23, P=0.042) (figure 1). More severe dry mouth was reported by patients undergoing targeted therapy (est=1.17, P=0.027).

      figure1_shi_quiling.tif

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      This real-world data demonstrates that, compared with conventional chemotherapy, targeted therapy correlates with less impairment of physiological condition and functioning in patients with mNSCLC. Additional follow up will confirm and expand these findings about the patient experience relative to treatment response.

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    P3.01 - Advanced NSCLC (Not CME Accredited Session) (ID 967)

    • Event: WCLC 2018
    • Type: Poster Viewing in the Exhibit Hall
    • Track:
    • Presentations: 2
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/26/2018, 12:00 - 13:30, Exhibit Hall
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      P3.01-109 - Real-World Patient-Reported Outcome Assessment of Patients with Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer  (ID 12213)

      12:00 - 13:30  |  Author(s): Viralkumar Bharatbhai Vaghani

      • Abstract
      • Slides

      Background

      Patient-Reported Outcomes (PROs) provide information on patient treatment experience. We have established a real-world Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Holistic Registry (ANCHoR) to understand how the advent of immunotherapy impacts treatment choice, clinical outcomes, and PROs of metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (mNSCLC). The aim of this analysis is to report early results of baseline symptom status and quality of life among mNSCLC patients using the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory lung cancer module (MDASI-LC) and EuroQol-5D 5-level version (EQ-5D-5L).

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      During 2017, patients with mNSCLC at a single institution were enrolled in ANCHoR and completed the PRO questionnaires at clinic visits. MDASI-LC consists of thirteen core and three lung cancer-specific symptom severity questions, and six interference items rated on 0-10 scales (0 = no symptom or interference, 10 = worst imaginable symptom or complete interference). EQ-5D-5L captures five health state dimensions: mobility, self-care, usual activities, pain/discomfort, and anxiety/depression rated on a five-level scale (1= no problems, 5= extreme problems). A single visual analogue scale (VAS) on EQ-5D-5L records patient self-rated health between ”best imaginable” (100) and “worst imaginable” (0) health state. Descriptive statistics for PRO scores at baseline are summarized.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      Forty-two patients completed baseline PROs before the start of therapy. Mean patient age was 63 years and 45% were males. For MDASI-LC, the mean scores for the core symptom, lung cancer-specific symptom, and interference subscales at baseline were 2.2 (standard deviation [SD] = 2.80), 2.1 (SD = 2.80), and 2.8 (SD = 3.10), respectively. Fatigue was the most severe symptom reported at baseline (mean = 4.1, SD = 3.01), followed by shortness of breath (mean = 3.2, SD = 2.81) and pain (mean = 3.19, SD = 3.00). The highest percentages of patients reporting moderate to severe symptom levels (score of ≥5) were 38% for fatigue, 33% for pain, 31% for drowsiness, 29% for shortness of breath and disturbed sleep, and 26% coughing. For EQ-5D-5L, 91% of patient reported problems with self-care, 81% with mobility, 48% with usual activity and anxiety, and 33% with pain. Mean EQ-5D VAS was 73.9 (SD = 18.2).

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      Prior to the start of treatment, fatigue, pain, drowsiness, disturbed sleep, and coughing were the most common symptoms with fatigue, shortness of breath, and pain being the most severe. Additional follow up will confirm and expand these findings and will also allow us to examine change in PROs after first-line treatment is administered.

      6f8b794f3246b0c1e1780bb4d4d5dc53

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      P3.01-91 - Computing the Impact of Immunotherapy on the Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) Therapeutic Landscape (ID 12209)

      12:00 - 13:30  |  Author(s): Viralkumar Bharatbhai Vaghani

      • Abstract

      Background

      The Advanced Non-Small Lung Holistic Registry (ANCHoR) is established to examine the real-world impact of immunotherapy on choice of treatment, clinical outcomes, and patient reported outcomes of patients with Stage IV NSCLC.

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      Stage IV NSCLC patients diagnosed or initiating treatment at MD Anderson from January 1, 2017 are enrolled in the ongoing ANCHoR study. Their demographic, clinicopathological, molecular, and treatment data were populated in a prospective database. Treatment patterns by line and PD-L1 status were summarized in this interim analysis.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      At the time of data cut off (Dec 31, 2017) 182 patients were enrolled in the registry, of which 150 were tested for PD-L1. Number of patients initiating first-, second-, and third-line treatment were 163, 42 and 7, respectively. Of the 30 patients not tested for PD-L1, 10 did not have enough tissue and 8 had actionable mutations.

      table 1.jpg

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      The emergence of immunotherapy has had a dramatic impact on the first-line treatment of patient with advanced NSCLC. As of December, 2017 up to 41% of patient received immunotherapy either singly (23%) or in combination with chemotherapy. Only 40% of the patients now receive chemotherapy alone. There has been dramatic decrease in the use of chemotherapy with an anti-angiogenesis agent (1.23%). In our dataset 16% of the patients were eligible for targeted therapy as initial treatment.

      6f8b794f3246b0c1e1780bb4d4d5dc53

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    P3.15 - Treatment in the Real World - Support, Survivorship, Systems Research (Not CME Accredited Session) (ID 981)

    • Event: WCLC 2018
    • Type: Poster Viewing in the Exhibit Hall
    • Track:
    • Presentations: 1
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/26/2018, 12:00 - 13:30, Exhibit Hall
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      P3.15-29 - Defining the Symptom Burden of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (ID 12361)

      12:00 - 13:30  |  Author(s): Viralkumar Bharatbhai Vaghani

      • Abstract
      • Slides

      Background

      Symptom burden is disease and treatment symptom severity and its impact on daily functioning. Symptom monitoring has demonstrated improved cancer patient outcomes, including quality of life, resource utilization, ability to continue treatment, and survival. The use of disease-specific patient-reported outcomes (PRO) measures facilitates individualized symptom monitoring and management. The purpose of this study was to describe symptom experience from the patient perspective and identify key symptoms for a PRO measure of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) symptom burden.

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      Patients with NSCLC described their symptom experience in single qualitative interviews. Content analysis was used to define the content for a PRO measure of NSCLC symptom burden.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      Mean age of the 40 patients interviewed was 66.1 years (standard deviation = 10.9); 60.0% were male, 77.5% were white, and 56.4% had stage IV disease. Content analysis found a total of 32 symptoms, 6 reported by ≥ 20% of participants (see Table 1). Symptoms varied based on treatment modality (chemotherapy versus radiation therapy), but not stage of disease. Numbness or tingling and sore mouth were described only by patients who had received chemotherapy. Patients volunteered ways in which symptoms impacted daily activities and relationships.

      Table 1. Patient quotes from qualitative interviews describing the 6 most common symptoms (reported by ≥ 20% of participants)
      Symptom Participant Quote
      Shortness of breath

      “The heaviness, it’s like a—wow, I don’t know how to explain it—like a rock and hard to breathe sometimes, just shortness of breath. Of course, the more I try to walk, or whatever, I’m more short of breath.”

      ‒ 67-year-old female
      Cough

      “I had a real bad cough. I think I actually even broke a couple of ribs coughing so much.”

      ‒ 52-year-old male

      Distress

      “Terrifying. There’s no ways about it. You know, it’s a terrifying experience, especially when it’s dropped in your lap and you have to deal with it. You go through a lot physically and mentally.”

      ‒ 67-year-old male
      Fatigue

      “I'm more tired. I take a lot of naps where I never had been a nap person. Before I had all my energy, and I was doing lots of things, and now I'm wore out. I wake up, and I'm wore out.”

      ‒ 53-year-old male
      Pain

      “You keep trying to move it to make it feel better and no matter where you put it, it doesn’t feel any better … most of the time it will bother me after I get out of bed in the morning for a while. And then if I go try to take a nap, I’ll go ahead and take something for pain because I can’t lay there and—I just keep moving it and moving it and nothing helps.”

      - 68-year-old male
      Constipation

      “I didn’t have a bowel movement. I had always taken the stool softeners because they told me to do that. And I kept thinking, “Well, it’s going to work. It’s going to work.” Finally, I was in so much pain that I couldn’t stand anymore, so I went to the hospital … and they ended up physically removing, which was horrible.”

      ‒ 68-year-old female

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      Patients with NSCLC experience numerous symptoms related to disease and treatment. Shortness of breath, cough, distress, fatigue, pain, and constipation were commonly reported symptoms, suggesting that clinicians should routinely and proactively monitor the presence and severity of these symptoms in NSCLC clinical care. In patients receiving chemotherapy, attention to specific treatment-related symptoms, including symptoms of neuropathy and sore mouth, is needed. While stage of disease does not produce unique symptoms, the severity of the symptoms may possibly vary by stage of disease. Clinicians should also be aware that symptoms result in interference with daily activities, relationships, life plans, treatment adherence, and mood.

      6f8b794f3246b0c1e1780bb4d4d5dc53

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