Virtual Library

Start Your Search

Dennis Wigle



Author of

  • +

    MA24 - Genomic Evolution, KEAP 3 and More Non-Coding RNA (ID 928)

    • Event: WCLC 2018
    • Type: Mini Oral Abstract Session
    • Track: Biology
    • Presentations: 1
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/26/2018, 10:30 - 12:00, Room 205 BD
    • +

      MA24.02 - Genomic Alterations in Lung Adenocarcinoma Precursor Lesions (ID 13037)

      10:35 - 10:40  |  Presenting Author(s): Dennis Wigle

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background

      Adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) and minimally invasive adenocarcinoma (MIA) are thought to be precursor lesions of invasive disease. Genomic alterations in these lesions have not been described.

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      Genomic analysis including whole genome and exome sequencing, and SNP array analysis were performed on 9 AIS and 18 MIA pathologically confirmed samples to identify single nucleotide variants (SNVs), structural variations and copy number variations. Mutation significance and signature analysis were determined by MutSig and NMF analyses. Pathway analysis was performed using ingenuity IPA.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      The range of mutation burden for AIS and MIA was 0.7 to 12/Mb with a median of 1.7/Mb. This compared to a mean of 7.2/Mb for invasive lung adenocarcinoma. Significantly mutated genes identified in AIS and MIA were ELAVL4, LIN37, XCL1, ELK3, RPS9, FBXO2, HLA-B and MYOG, which affected pathways regulating ESR1, ELAVL1 and TP53. Genes with recurrent mutations included MTPN, CDC27, GGT2, CTBP2, EGFR, NCOR1 and TGIF1 and implicated EGFR, MYC and MAPK1 pathways. Somatic mutations were characterized by C>T and T>C transition signature, whereas CNV analysis found high concentrations of copy number amplifications at 6p21.3 to 6p22.1, 8q24.12 to 8q24.3 and at 21q22.3. There were comparable structural variations in the AIS cases compared to MIA.

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      In contrast to hypothesized models of tumor progression, AIS and MIA can harbor significant genomic alterations and tumor mutation burden. These observations challenge the notion of accumulating mutation burden during the progression to invasive disease. The finding of high mutation burden in some of these precursor lesions also suggests the intriguing concept of immunotherapeutic options for either treatment or chemoprevention.

      6f8b794f3246b0c1e1780bb4d4d5dc53

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      Only Active Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login or select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout.

  • +

    P1.16 - Treatment of Early Stage/Localized Disease (Not CME Accredited Session) (ID 948)

    • Event: WCLC 2018
    • Type: Poster Viewing in the Exhibit Hall
    • Track:
    • Presentations: 1
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/24/2018, 16:45 - 18:00, Exhibit Hall
    • +

      P1.16-47 - Adjuvant Targeted Therapy Following Standard Adjuvant Therapy for Resected NSCLC: An Initial Report from ALCHEMIST (Alliance A151216) (ID 12828)

      16:45 - 18:00  |  Author(s): Dennis Wigle

      • Abstract
      • Slides

      Background

      The Adjuvant Lung Cancer Enrichment Marker Identification and Sequencing Trial (ALCHEMIST) was launched in 2014 across the National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). This trial platform aims to enroll up to 8300 patients with resected high-risk non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to facilitate enrollment to adjuvant targeted therapy trials following completion of standard adjuvant therapy, and to collect biospecimens for clinical and investigational genomics. On 5/1/2016, the study was expanded to include squamous NSCLC and PDL1 testing to facilitate enrollment to a new immunotherapy study.

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      Eligible patients have completely resected NSCLC, stage IB (>4cm) to IIIA by AJCC 7. Eligibility window extends 75-285 days post-op depending upon receipt of adjuvant chemotherapy and/or radiation. Molecular testing of EGFR, ALK, PDL1 is performed centrally (depending on the histology and testing results) and results are returned to sites within 7-21 days. FFPE tissue and blood are collected by the NCI for genomic analysis. Appropriate patients may then enroll to one of three therapeutic trials studying single agent adjuvant targeted therapy (erlotinib NCT02193282, crizotinib NCT02201992, or nivolumab NCT02595944) versus observation.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      As of March 19, 2018, 2945 patients have been enrolled from 575 sites within the US, with a median enrollment of 98/month (range: 71-133) in 2017. Central molecular testing was completed in 83%-92% of appropriate patients: EGFR L858R/19del was detected in 395 of 2468 patients (16.0%), ALK FISH was positive in 106 of 2458 patients (4.3%), and PDL1 IHC was >1% in 902 of 1464 patients (61.6%). Adequate tissue and blood for whole exome sequencing (WES) was collected on 1928 patients (65.5%), and enrollment plasma (added January 2017) has been collected on 885 patients (30.1%). Of 1960 patients deemed to be eligible for the adjuvant treatment trials with sufficient follow-up, 560 (28.6%) were enrolled; those enrolled were younger (p=0.01) and had higher N stage (<0.01) than those not enrolled. The primary reason for eligible patients not enrolling to treatment trials was lack of interest in further adjuvant therapy (53%).

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      ALCHEMIST has achieved an enrollment of ~100 patients/month with resected high-risk NSCLC. This initial report demonstrates the feasibility of central molecular testing for enrollment to adjuvant targeted therapies. Efforts are ongoing to plan clinically-informed genomic analyses of tumor and plasma, as well as the planning of new treatment arms that leverage this ongoing trial platform.

      Support: U10CA180821, U10CA180882, U10CA180820, U10CA180868, U10CA180888; ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02194738

      6f8b794f3246b0c1e1780bb4d4d5dc53

      Only Active Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login or select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout.