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Juan Wisnivesky



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    MA01 - Early Stage Lung Cancer: Questions and Controversies (ID 894)

    • Event: WCLC 2018
    • Type: Mini Oral Abstract Session
    • Track: Treatment of Early Stage/Localized Disease
    • Presentations: 1
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/24/2018, 10:30 - 12:00, Room 202 BD
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      MA01.05 - Opioids and Sleep Medication Use After Surgery for Early Stage Lung Cancer: A SEER-Medicare Analysis (ID 12961)

      11:00 - 11:05  |  Author(s): Juan Wisnivesky

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background

      More than 50% of patients undergoing surgery for early stage lung cancer experience persistent post-operative pain, which can prevent their returning to normal daily activities and cause disruptions in sleep. Whether Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery (VATS), a minimally invasive surgical technique, reduces long-term opioid and sleep medication use compared to traditional open surgery has not yet been established.

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      The Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results data linked to Medicare data (SEER-Medicare) database was queried to identify patients with stage I primary non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who had VATS or open resection between 2007 to 2013, and had no record of opioid medication in the 30 days before surgery. Long-term opioid and sleep medication use were defined as having fulfilled one or more prescriptions in the first 90 days after surgery as well another prescription in the 90-180 days post-surgery. Logistic regression was used to investigate the associations between surgical type and long-term opioid and sleep medication use. Models were adjusted for relevant clinical and socioeconomic covariates.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      There were 3,900 NSCLC patients included in this analysis; 1,987 (51.0%) VATS and 1,913 (49.0%) open surgery patients; 15.5% of patients had a record of opioid use and 9.7% of sleep medication use long-term postoperatively.

      In the adjusted model, patients were less likely to use opioids long-term if they had VATS (ORadj 0.69, 95% CI: 0.57-0.84), were older (ORadj 0.96, 95% CI: 0.94-0.98), diagnosed in a later year (ORadj 0.86, 95% CI: 0.82-0.90), and had higher income (ORadj 0.77, 95% CI: 0.60-0.99). Long-term opioid use was more likely in those with a higher comorbidity score (ORadj 1.10 , 95% CI: 1.05-1.16), large cell histology (ORadj 1.88, 95% CI: 1.17-3.00), using sleep medication before surgery (ORadj 1.72, 95% CI: 1.28-2.32) and with a previous psychiatric condition (ORadj 1.64, 95% CI: 1.28-2.09).

      After adjustment, only those with a previous psychiatric condition (ORadj 1.95, 95% CI: 1.40-2.71) and previous sleep medication use (ORadj 37.36, 95% CI: 27.92-50.00) were more likely to use sleep medications long-term; no significant difference were observed with type of surgery (ORadj 1.01, 95% CI: 0.76-1.33).

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      Patients who were not previous opioid users became long-term opioid users after surgery. VATS might offer NSCLC patients a better quality of life than open surgery, and therefore minimize the risk of longer-term opioid use.

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