Virtual Library

Start Your Search

Kay See Tan



Author of

  • +

    MA01 - Early Stage Lung Cancer: Questions and Controversies (ID 894)

    • Event: WCLC 2018
    • Type: Mini Oral Abstract Session
    • Track: Treatment of Early Stage/Localized Disease
    • Presentations: 1
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/24/2018, 10:30 - 12:00, Room 202 BD
    • +

      MA01.02 - Histologic Subtyping in Pathologic Stage I Lung Adenocarcinoma Provides Risk-Based Stratification for Surveillance (ID 13400)

      10:35 - 10:40  |  Author(s): Kay See Tan

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background

      Current national practice guidelines (NCCN, ACCP, ESMO) recommend a uniform follow-up protocol with intensive surveillance within the first two years following lung resection for stage I NSCLC. We hypothesize that the recurrence hazard following lung resection for stage I lung adenocarcinoma (ADC) varies according to histologic subtype.

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      A total of 1572 patients with resected pathologic stage I lung ADC were investigated. Two thoracic pathologists reviewed all tumor H&E slides (range 1-8, median 3) for histologic subtyping and percentage of each subtype. Recurrence hazard was estimated using the Kernel-Epanechnikov smoothing procedure. Association between recurrence hazard and high-grade histologic subtypes (micropapillary [MIP] and solid [SOL]) was assessed.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      Presence (≥5%) of these high-grade subtypes (MIP and/or SOL) was associated with significant increase of recurrence hazard compared to high-grade pattern negative (<5%) tumors (Figure): 1) patients with presence of either MIP or SOL had significant recurrence hazard peaks within two years after surgery; 2) SOL was associated with early hazard peak at the first year after surgery especially in distant recurrence hazard; 4) one-third of patients (515/1572, 33%) had no high-grade subtypes, in which the recurrence hazard was consistently very low (<2% risk each year) during the 10-year period after surgery without any hazard peak (red arrow).

      hazard fig 300.jpg

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      Our data suggest the utility of histologic subtyping for identifying patients with very low recurrence hazard, and provide foundation for establishing risk-based follow-up protocols. A potential option for low-risk patients may be omission of intensive follow-up during the first two years after surgery.

      6f8b794f3246b0c1e1780bb4d4d5dc53

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      Only Active Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login or select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout.

  • +

    MA05 - Improving Outcomes in Locoregional NSCLC II (ID 901)

    • Event: WCLC 2018
    • Type: Mini Oral Abstract Session
    • Track: Treatment of Locoregional Disease - NSCLC
    • Presentations: 1
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/24/2018, 13:30 - 15:00, Room 105
    • +

      MA05.03 - Immune Microenvironment and its Association with Adjuvant Chemotherapy Benefit in Locoregionally Advanced Lung Adenocarcinoma (ID 12999)

      13:40 - 13:45  |  Author(s): Kay See Tan

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background

      The impact of the tumor immune microenvironment on the effectiveness of platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy (ACT) in locoregionally advanced (stage II-III) lung adenocarcinoma (ADC) is unknown. We performed an analysis of the cellular components of the tumoral and tumor-associated stromal immune environment in stage II-III lung ADC and examined their association with ACT benefit.

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      Tissue microarrays (6 tumor and 3 stromal cores from each tumor) were constructed using resected tissue from patients with pT2-T4N1 lung ADC (n=500, 2000-2012) who did (n=225) and did not (n=214) receive ACT. Multiplex immunofluorescence was used to determine the quantity, localization, and colocalization of 21 types of immune cells and markers (including PD-1, PD-L1, CD3, CD20, CD68, CD163, MPO, and PanCK). The association between immune cell infiltration and recurrence free probability (RFP) was compared using Kaplan-Meier methods, and benefit from ACT by unsupervised hierarchical cluster modeling.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      Overall, increased tumoral infiltration of CD20+ B-cells and CD3+ and CD4+ T-cells was associated with an improvement in 5-yr RFP (CD20+ low vs high: 37% vs 49%, p=.03; CD3+: 39% vs 48%, p=.003; and CD4+: 39% vs 47%, p=.02, respectively) whereas increased stromal MPO+ neutrophil infiltration was associated with a worse 5-yr RFP (low vs high: 50% vs 38%, p=.003). Among patients who received ACT, cluster modeling revealed 5 risk groups (Groups A-E; Figure) with immune signatures including tumoral B-cells and CD163+PD-1+ macrophages as well as stromal CD57+ NK-cells and CD163+PD-L1+ macrophages that provided a progressive stratification of RFP following adjuvant treatment.

      vaghjiani.jpg

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      Immune infiltration analysis can predict benefit from ACT and thereby provide a rationale to select patients for either chemotherapy, immunotherapy, or combination therapy following surgical resection.

      6f8b794f3246b0c1e1780bb4d4d5dc53

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      Only Active Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login or select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout.

  • +

    MA06 - PDL1, TMB and DNA Repair (ID 903)

    • Event: WCLC 2018
    • Type: Mini Oral Abstract Session
    • Track: Biology
    • Presentations: 1
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/24/2018, 13:30 - 15:00, Room 206 AC
    • +

      MA06.06 - An Ex-Vivo Patient-Derived, Immunocompetent (PDI) Culture System to Evaluate Immunotherapeutic Agents’ Anti-Tumor Efficacy (ID 14299)

      14:05 - 14:10  |  Author(s): Kay See Tan

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background

      Anti-tumor efficacy of human immunotherapeutic agents, such as antibodies, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) and T-cell receptor transduced T cells, are currently being investigated in immunodeficient mice prior to clinical translation. We developed and optimized an ex-vivo culture system utilizing malignant pleural effusions (MPEs) to compliment these investigations in a human, immunocompetent, tumor-like environment. We hypothesized that CAR T cells’ cytotoxicity will vary by the different immune compositions in each MPE, which are conditions unavailable in current efficacy assays.

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      Mesothelin-targeted CAR T cells from multiple donors were exposed to MPEs derived from non-small cell lung cancer patients (n=15) and RPMI culture medium. Influence of the MPEs on CAR T-cell efficacy was evaluated by viability and phenotype (flow cytometry), cytotoxicity (chromium release assay), and gene expression (NanoString). Group-based trajectory modeling was used to stratify the inhibitory effect of MPEs. MPE composition (ELISA and Luminex assays) was evaluated to interpret its influence on CAR T cells.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      With the incorporation of our optimized protocols, T cells retain their viability, phenotype (CD4/CD8), and percentage of CAR expression when cultured in MPEs. MPE soluble factor levels remained stable over multiple freeze/thaw cycles. CAR T cells co-cultured in MPE exhibited variable antigen-specific cytotoxicity (Fig. A). MPE-induced T-cell inhibition was stratified into groups of strong, mild, or no inhibition. (Fig. B). Compared to MPEs with either mild or no inhibition, MPEs with strong inhibition had significantly higher levels of TGFβ-2 (average TGFβ-2 level in strong vs. mild inhibition: 402 vs. 50 pg/mL, p<0.05) (Fig. C), IL-6, RANTES, and IL-5.

      pdi culture system.jpg

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      We present the first human immunocompetent culture system that can be used to evaluate immunotherapeutic agents’ efficacy prior to their clinical translation. Furthermore, analyses of the culture system’s soluble factors sheds light on their relative influence on T-cell efficacy.

      6f8b794f3246b0c1e1780bb4d4d5dc53

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      Only Active Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login or select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout.

  • +

    MA12 - Mesothelioma Surgery and Novel Targets for Prognosis and Therapy (ID 913)

    • Event: WCLC 2018
    • Type: Mini Oral Abstract Session
    • Track: Mesothelioma
    • Presentations: 1
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/25/2018, 10:30 - 12:00, Room 202 BD
    • +

      MA12.07 - gC1qR Expression is Independently Prognostic for Survival Benefit Following Chemotherapy in Mesothelioma (ID 13284)

      11:10 - 11:15  |  Author(s): Kay See Tan

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background

      Overexpression of gC1qR, a multicompartmental and multifunctional cellular protein, has been shown to promote chemotherapy-induced apoptosis in cancer cells, but compromise CD4 T-cell proliferation in viral infections. The goal of this study was to investigate the overexpression of gC1qR, and its prognostic association with chemotherapy and CD4 T-cell infiltration in malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM).

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      Tissue microarrays comprising 6 tumoral and 3 stromal cores from 265 patients with MPM (216 epitheloid, 26 biphasic, and 23sarcomatoid, 1989-2010) were investigated by immunohistochemistry for gC1qR expression (intensity and distribution by H-score, range 0-300), and CD4 T-cell infiltration. Overall survival (OS) was analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method (high versus low gC1qR expression delineated by median score). Multi-variable analysis included clinical, pathological factors and stage (T, N).

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      In comparison to benign and reactive mesothelial cells (median H-score 30), gC1qR is overexpressed (median H-score 155) in all histological types of MPMs (263/265, 99.2%). In epithelioid MPM patients – 1) among patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC), high gC1qR was associated with better median OS (25 vs.11 months, Fig1A), 2) among patients without NAC, high gC1qR was associated with better survival, survival benefit is pronounced in patients who received postoperative chemotherapy (median OS 38 vs.19 months, Fig1B), and 3) in multivariate analysis, high gC1qR was an independent factor for better OS. gC1qR expression did not correlate with CD4 T cell infiltration. However, among patients without NAC, high CD4+ T cell infiltration-high gC1qR expression was associated with better OS (26 vs 18,12, and11 months, Fig1C).

      gc1qr.jpg

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      gC1qR is overexpressed on MPM cells. MPM patients with high gC1qR expression have a significant survival benefit particularly following chemotherapy; or in the presence of high CD4 T-cell infiltration.

      6f8b794f3246b0c1e1780bb4d4d5dc53

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      Only Active Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login or select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout.

  • +

    MA22 - New Therapeutics, Pathology, and Brain Metastases for Small Cell and Neuroendocrine Tumour (ID 925)

    • Event: WCLC 2018
    • Type: Mini Oral Abstract Session
    • Track: Small Cell Lung Cancer/NET
    • Presentations: 1
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/25/2018, 15:15 - 16:45, Room 206 BD
    • +

      MA22.05 - Impact of Tumor Spread Through Air Spaces (STAS) in Lung Neuroendocrine Tumors (NETs) (ID 14221)

      15:45 - 15:50  |  Author(s): Kay See Tan

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background

      We have previously reported the prognostic significance of STAS in lung adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence and prognostic impact of STAS in lung NETs.

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      We evaluated all tumor slides (range 2-7, median 3) for presence of STAS from patients with p-Stage I-III primary lung NETs [n=628, typical carcinoid (TC, n=305), atypical carcinoid (AC, n=38), large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC, n=93) and small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC, n=57)]. Patients with combined NETs were excluded from this analysis (n=19). Cumulative incidence of recurrence (CIR) and lung cancer-specific cumulative incidence of death (LC-CID) were analyzed by competing risks approach.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      STAS was identified in 25% of NETs (15% in TC, 37% in AC, 43% in LCNEC, and 46% in SCLC). Prognostic analysis in TC cohort was not conducted due to the small number of events (<5 events). Patients with STAS positive tumors were associated with higher CIR than STAS negative tumors in the total (AC-LCNEC-SCLC) cohort as well as individual AC, LCNEC and SCLC cohorts (Figure 1, A-D). STAS was also associated with higher LC-CID in all cohorts except for AC (Figure 1, E-H). In multivariable analysis, STAS was a significant risk factor for recurrence and lung cancer specific-death, independent of stage and histologic subtype. Stratified by stage, STAS was an independent predictor of recurrence (subhazard ratio [SHR] 2.39, 95% CI 1.26-4.54, p= 0.007) and lung cancer-specific death (SHR 2.42, 95% CI 1.21- 4.84, p= 0.012) in LCNEC. In SCLC, STAS was also an independent risk factor of lung cancer-specific death (SHR 4.06, 95% CI 1.33- 12.35, p= 0.014).

      stas net figure abstract iaslc 2018 isa.jpg

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      STAS is a significant prognosticator in individual NET subtypes; AC, LCNEC, and SCLC. STAS is an independent poor prognostic factor in LCNEC and SCLC for lung cancer-specific death.

      6f8b794f3246b0c1e1780bb4d4d5dc53

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      Only Active Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login or select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout.