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Sai-Hong Ignatius Ou



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    ES04 - Liquid Biopsies in Lung Cancer (ID 772)

    • Event: WCLC 2018
    • Type: Educational Session
    • Track: Targeted Therapy
    • Presentations: 1
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/25/2018, 15:15 - 16:45, Room 203 BD
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      ES04.00 - Introduction with Poll Questions (ID 14931)

      15:15 - 15:20  |  Presenting Author(s): Sai-Hong Ignatius Ou

      • Abstract
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

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    MA04 - Novel Approaches with IO (ID 900)

    • Event: WCLC 2018
    • Type: Mini Oral Abstract Session
    • Track: Immunooncology
    • Presentations: 1
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/24/2018, 13:30 - 15:00, Room 107
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      MA04.03 - Immunotherapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers (NSCLC) with Oncogenic Driver Mutations: New Results from the Global IMMUNOTARGET Registry (ID 13187)

      13:40 - 13:45  |  Author(s): Sai-Hong Ignatius Ou

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background

      Prospective data on immunotherapy for NSCLC with oncogenic driver mutations are limited. We recently reported first results from the global IMMUNOTARGET registry (Mazières, ASCO 2018). Here, we present new data for PD-L1 and mutation subgroups.

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      In 2017, we started an international retrospective registry study ("IMMUNOTARGET") for patients with advanced NSCLC, known driver mutations (KRAS, EGFR, ALK, ROS1, BRAF, HER2, MET and RET) and PD-L1 immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy. The registry is approved by University of Toulouse and Swissethics, and funded by University of Toulouse and Cantonal Hospital of Lucerne. Anonymized real-world data submitted to the coordinating center include: patient and tumor characteristics, mutation test methods and results, systemic therapy lines, immune related adverse events, best response by RECIST, survival, and tumor PD-L1 expression (optional). Statistical calculations including best response, median PFS and OS are done at University of Toulouse.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      In April 2018, the registry included 551 pts from Europe, USA, Israel and Australia. Patients were 50% male/female, 28% current smokers, median age 60 years (range 28-83), 85% had PS0/1. Most (73%) tumors were stage IV at diagnosis, almost all (96%) were adenocarcinomas. Molecular classification by dominant driver mutation: KRAS=271 (49%), EGFR=125 (23%), BRAF=43 (8%), MET=36 (7%), HER2=29 (5%), ALK=23 (4%), RET=16 (3%), ROS1=7 (1%), 1 (0.2%) not classified (ALK+RET+MET). Most pts received nivolumab (466) or pembrolizumab (48) and were treated with immunotherapy in second or third line (67%). The median number of cycles was 5 (range 1-68). Fifty (11%) pts had grade 3-5 toxicity. Median OS from start of immunotherapy was 13.3 months, median PFS was 2.8 months. Best response was PR/CR in: KRAS=26%, BRAF=24%, ROS1=17%, MET=16%, EGFR=12%, HER2=7%, RET=6%, ALK=0%. Percentage of PD-L1 positive cells was available for 177 pts: 0%=71 (40%), 1-49%=46 (26%), 50-100%=60 (34%). Median % of positive cells was highest for ROS1 (90%), BRAF (50%), MET (30%) and RET (26%) mutant tumors. PD-L1 positivity was predictive for improved PFS in KRAS and EGFR mutant tumors. PD-L1 status was known in 18 tumors with ALK, ROS1 or RET rearrangements: 5 had 0%, 4 had 1-49% and 9 had 50%-100%. No tumor remissions were observed in this subgroup. The registry remains open, updated results will be presented at the conference.

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      Although response rates were lower than in KRAS mutant NSCLC, individual tumors with other driver mutations responded to immunotherapy. PD-L1 expression may not accurately predict clinical benefit from immunotherapy in some molecular subgroups, better markers are needed.

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    MA16 - Novel Mechanisms for Molecular Profiling (ID 917)

    • Event: WCLC 2018
    • Type: Mini Oral Abstract Session
    • Track: Advanced NSCLC
    • Presentations: 1
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/25/2018, 13:30 - 15:00, Room 203 BD
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      MA16.05 - MET Kinase Domain Rearrangements (KDRE) in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) Identified Through Comprehensive Genomic Profiling (CGP) (ID 13401)

      14:00 - 14:05  |  Presenting Author(s): Sai-Hong Ignatius Ou

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background

      MET is a known oncogenic driver in NSCLC, and activation via various means including gene amplification, exon 14 skipping, and fusion has been reported to be targetable in the clinical setting. However, the prevalence and characteristics of NSCLCs harboring MET kinase fusions as well as diverse KDRE have not been comprehensively assessed.

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      Hybrid-capture based CGP was performed on 32,643 FFPE or 3,076 blood-based ctDNA NSCLC specimens during the course of clinical care. Tumor mutational burden (TMB) was determined on 0.83-1.1 megabases (Mb) of sequenced DNA and is reported as mutations/Mb.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      In 35,719 unique NSCLC patient cases assayed, RE retaining the MET kinase domain were detected in 63 (0.2%) cases. These included MET fusions with an identified 5’ fusion partner (n=8, 12.7%), probable MET fusions with an unidentified fusion partner (n=32, 50.8%), MET kinase domain duplications (KDD, n=7, 11.1%), MET exon 14 skipping rearrangements (n=6, 9.5%), and MET rearrangements of the 5’ terminus (n=10, 15.9%). Fusion partners identified include CAPZA2 (2 cases), CAV2, CD47, INPPL1, LHFPL3, PRKAR2B and SPECC1. MET kinase-inactivating rearrangements were also detected in the larger cohort (n=10, 0.03%). MET KDRE cases harbored at least one targetable NSCLC NCCN guidelines driver alteration in 27.0% (n=17) of cases including EGFR activating subs (L858R, L861Q) or exon 19 deletions (n=8), MET exon 14 skipping short variants (n=6), ALK fusions (n=2), and a BRAF V600E mutation. KRAS short variants were detected in 6 additional cases. MET amplification also co-occurred in 36.5% of cases with MET KDRE (n=23, median copy number 16). The median TMB in cases with MET KDRE was 6.1 mut/Mb, as compared to a median of 7.0 mut/Mb for NSCLC samples overall. Clinical treatment information for a subset of cases will be presented, including paired cases in which the MET KDRE may represent an acquired mechanism of resistance to EGFR- or ALK-targeted therapy.

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      Potentially targetable MET rearrangements retaining the kinase domain were observed in 0.2% of NSCLCs, which may be an underestimate considering that these assays sequence all MET exons, but do not specifically bait MET intronic breakpoints. These data suggest that MET KDRE, including, but not limited to fusions and KDD, may represent a distinct subset of driver alterations and potential resistance mechanisms. The value of testing for and potentially targeting these alterations as part of routine clinical care in NSCLC warrants further investigation.

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    OA02 - Novel Therapies in ROS1, HER2 and EGFR (ID 893)

    • Event: WCLC 2018
    • Type: Oral Abstract Session
    • Track: Targeted Therapy
    • Presentations: 2
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/24/2018, 10:30 - 12:00, Room 105
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      OA02.02 - Safety and Preliminary Clinical Activity of Ropotrectinib (TPX-0005), a ROS1/TRK/ALK Inhibitor, in Advanced ROS1 Fusion-Positive NSCLC (ID 14217)

      10:40 - 10:50  |  Author(s): Sai-Hong Ignatius Ou

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background

      Ropotrectinib is a potent ROS1/TRK/ALK inhibitor with a >90-fold greater ROS1 potency than crizotinib. Preclinical studies demonstrate robust activity against all known ROS1 resistance mutations, including solvent-front mutation G2032R.

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      In this Phase 1 study (NCT03093116), TKI-naïve and TKI-refractory (≥1 TKI) pts with advanced ALK/ROS1/TRK+ solid tumors received ropotrectinib. Asymptomatic brain metastases were allowed. Primary objectives were to determine MTD and RP2D, with safety, pharmacokinetics, and preliminary antitumor efficacy as the secondary objectives. This is a safety analysis of all pts and subgroup efficacy analysis of the ROS1+ NSCLC pts on the study.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      As of 16-April-2018, 72 pts have been treated at 6 dose levels from 40mg QD to 200mg BID. Most AEs were grade 1-2. Common (>10%) treatment-related AEs included dizziness (49%), dysgeusia (46%), paresthesias (29%), constipation (19%), fatigue (18%), nausea (11%), and anemia (11%). 4 DLTs were observed at ≥240mg/day: 1 grade 3 (Gr3) dyspnea/hypoxia, 2 Gr3 & 1 Gr2 dizziness. 31 of 72 pts had ROS1+ NSCLC by local testing (FISH, n=20; NGS, n=11) with 1 pt determined as ROS1-negative by central NGS. Antitumor activity in ROS1+ NSCLC has been observed at ROS1 dose levels 40mg QD-160mg BID per investigator assessment, with the best ORR 70% for TKI-naïve and 11% for TKI-refractory pts (17% for 1 prior TKI crizotinib, n=12) (Table). Two crizotinib-resistant pts with G2032R achieved durable cPR and cSD, respectively. Ongoing blinded independent review identified 7 evaluable pts with target CNS lesions at baseline; the intracranial best ORR was 43% (3 cPR, 1 PR*). Updated efficacy data and ctDNA biomarker analyses will be presented.

      Dose Level

      TKI Naïve (n = 10)

      TKI Refractory (n = 20)

      n

      Best Overall Response

      n

      Best Overall Response

      40 mg QD (n = 6)

      2

      2 cPR (ORR 100%)

      4

      2 cSD, 1 SD, 1 PD

      80 mg QD (n = 5)

      2

      2 cPR (ORR 100%)

      3

      1 cSD, 2 SD

      160 mg QD (n = 10)

      4

      2 cPR, 2 cSD (ORR 50%)

      6

      2 cPR, 2 cSD, 1 SD, 1 PD (ORR 33%)

      240 mg QD (n = 2)

      1

      1 cPR (ORR 100%)

      1

      1 SD

      160 mg BID (n = 7)

      1

      1 PR*

      6

      1 PR*, 1 SD*, 1 cSD, 2 SD, 1 NE

      Total (n = 30)

      10

      7 cPR, 1 PR*, 2 cSD

      20

      2 cPR, 1 PR*, 6 cSD, 1 SD*, 7 SD, 2 PD, 1 NE

      Best ORR

      70%

      11%

      Median follow-up

      8 months with 90% still on treatment

      4 months with 50% still on treatment

      cPR: confirmed partial response; SD: stable disease for 2 cycles; cSD: SD for at least 4 cycles; PR* or SD*: waiting for subsequent time point scan; PD: progressive disease; NE: inevaluable; ORR: objective response rate

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      Ropotrectinib is well tolerated and demonstrates promising activity in pts with advanced ROS1+ NSCLC, including TKI-naïve and TKI-refractory pts. RP2D has not yet been achieved. These Phase 1 data warrant further clinical testing of ropotrectinib in ROS1+ NSCLC.

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      OA02.03 - Clinical Activity of Lorlatinib in Patients with ROS1+ Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Phase 2 Study Cohort EXP-6 (ID 12787)

      10:50 - 11:00  |  Presenting Author(s): Sai-Hong Ignatius Ou

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background

      Among patients with ROS1-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), most achieve initial benefit from crizotinib treatment but often develop resistance, and further treatment options are limited. Lorlatinib is a potent, brain-penetrant third-generation ALK/ROS1 TKI with broad mutational coverage. It has shown compelling clinical activity in patients with ALK-positive and ROS1-positive advanced NSCLC, most of whom had CNS metastases and had received prior crizotinib.

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      This ongoing Phase 2 study (NCT01970865) enrolled patients with ROS1-positive advanced NSCLC ± asymptomatic CNS metastases without restriction on the type or number of prior lines of therapy (cohort EXP-6). Patients received lorlatinib 100 mg QD. Primary endpoints were overall and intracranial response by independent central review. Secondary endpoints included duration of response and progression-free survival. Safety was assessed in all treated patients (cohorts EXP-1–6); molecular profiling is ongoing.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      As of the data cut-off (02 Feb 2018), 47 patients with ROS1+ NSCLC were treated; 25 had baseline CNS metastases; 34 had received prior crizotinib and 13 were crizotinib-naïve. Treatment with lorlatinib led to rapid and durable responses in both crizotinib-naïve and crizotinib-pre-exposed patients (Table).

      ICR-assessed endpoint Crizotinib-naïve Crizotinib-pre-exposed Total EXP-6
      Overall, N 13 34 47
      ORR, % (95% CI) 61.5 (31.6, 86.1) 26.5 (12.9, 44.4) 36.2 (22.7, 51.5)
      Confirmed response, n 8 9 17

      Response lasting at least 12 months, n

      5 5 10
      Median time to tumor response, months (range) 1.4 (1.3–8.3) 2.5 (1.4–4.2) 1.4 (1.3–8.3)
      Intracranial (IC), N 6 19 25
      IC ORR, % (95% CI) 66.7 (22.3, 95.7) 52.6 (28.9, 75.6) 56.0 (34.9, 75.6)
      Confirmed IC response, n 4 10 14

      IC response lasting at least 12 months, n

      1 4 5
      Median PFS, months (95% CI)a 21.0 (4.2, 26.7) 8.5 (4.4, 18.0) 9.9 (5.5, 21.0)

      ICR, independent central review; PFS, progression-free survival.

      aPer Kaplan-Meier method.

      The most common treatment-related adverse events (TRAEs) in EXP-6, were hypercholesterolemia (83%) and hypertriglyceridemia (60%). In EXP-6, 36% and 23% of patients had TRAEs leading to dose interruptions and dose reductions, respectively. No permanent treatment discontinuations due to TRAEs or treatment-related deaths occurred.

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      Lorlatinib showed clinically meaningful benefit in patients with ROS1-positive NSCLC, including those who had received prior crizotinib or were crizotinib-naive, as demonstrated by rapid and durable responses. These findings further suggest that the activity of lorlatinib differs depending on prior exposure to crizotinib. The safety profile of lorlatinib in ROS1 patients was comparable to that previously reported in the overall ALK/ROS1 population.

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    OA12 - Novel Therapies in MET, RET and BRAF (ID 921)

    • Event: WCLC 2018
    • Type: Oral Abstract Session
    • Track: Targeted Therapy
    • Presentations: 1
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/25/2018, 15:15 - 16:45, Room 106
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      OA12.02 - Updated Antitumor Activity of Crizotinib in Patients with MET Exon 14-Altered Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (ID 13453)

      15:25 - 15:35  |  Author(s): Sai-Hong Ignatius Ou

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background

      MET exon 14 alterations occur in ~3% of non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLCs) and 20–30% of sarcomatoid lung carcinomas. Here we present updated antitumor activity for crizotinib in patients with advanced NSCLC whose tumors are positive for MET exon 14 alterations (hereafter MET exon 14-positive NSCLC), including updated biomarker analyses in circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA).

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      Patients with MET exon 14-positive NSCLC by local molecular profiling were treated with 250 mg crizotinib BID in an expansion cohort of the ongoing PROFILE 1001 study (NCT00585195). Responses were based on derived investigator assessment per RECIST v1.0. Prospective plasma profiling for MET exon 14 alterations in plasma ctDNA was performed (PlasmaSELECT-R64; Personal Genome Diagnostics, Boston, MA).

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      As of Jan 31, 2018, 69 patients (65 response-evaluable) with MET exon 14-positive NSCLC had been treated. Median age was 72 y (range: 34, 91). Tumor histology was: 84% adenocarcinoma, 9% sarcomatoid adenocarcinoma, 4% squamous cell carcinoma and 3% adenosquamous carcinoma. 61% were former-smokers, 38% never-smokers and 1% a current smoker. Median duration of treatment was 7.4 mo (95% CI: 5.5, 9.1), with 29% of patients ongoing. Confirmed responses were 3 CRs and 18 PRs (ORR, 32% [95% CI: 21, 45]); 29 patients had SD as their best overall response (Figure).

      crizo cmet ex14 waterfall_4may2018-v3.jpg

      Median time to response was 7.6 weeks (range: 3.7, 16.3). Median DOR was 9.1 mo (95% CI: 6.4, 12.7). Median PFS was 7.3 mo (95% CI: 5.4, 9.1). MET exon 14 alterations were detected in ctDNA from 18/37 (49%) patients with analyzable samples.

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      In patients with MET exon 14-positive advanced NSCLC, crizotinib treatment led to objective responses that were rapid and durable, with CRs in some cases. Plasma ctDNA profiling detected MET exon 14 alterations in a subset of patients who harbor MET exon 14 alterations by tumor testing.

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    P2.13 - Targeted Therapy (Not CME Accredited Session) (ID 962)

    • Event: WCLC 2018
    • Type: Poster Viewing in the Exhibit Hall
    • Track:
    • Presentations: 1
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/25/2018, 16:45 - 18:00, Exhibit Hall
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      P2.13-46 - Comprehensive Investigation of ERBB2 Transmembrane Domain Mutations (V659/G660) in 12,833 Chinese Lung Cancer Patients (ID 13466)

      16:45 - 18:00  |  Author(s): Sai-Hong Ignatius Ou

      • Abstract
      • Slides

      Background

      The ERBB2/HER2 receptor tyrosine kinase belongs to the human EGFR family and is a known oncogenic driver in many cancers including lung cancer. Majority of ERBB2 mutations are within its kinase domain in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Rare transmembrane domain (TMD) mutations of ERBB2 have also been identified at V659/G660 residues, which potentially stabilize ERBB2 heterodimerization with EGFR, favour a kinase activating conformation, and have shown to respond to afatinib (Ou et al, JTO 2017).

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      We interrogated next-generation sequencing data from 19,800 Chinese cancer patients, including 12,833 lung cancers between 2014 and 2017. Sample types include formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) or fresh tumor samples, and/or circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) from pleural effusion or plasma. Patients’ demographic and clinical data were further analyzed.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      ERBB2 TMD mutations at V659 were identified in twelve adenocarcinomas patients (five with V659D and seven with V659E), accounting for 0.14% of lung adenocarcinomas and 0.09% of all lung cancers. However, no G660 mutations were observed in this patient cohort. There is no gender preference for patients carrying such mutations (50%:50%). The median age of these patients is 56 with a trend to be younger in female patients. Two cases also carry other known driver alterations, EGFR L858R mutation and PIK3CA amplification, respectively. One case has two tumor tissue samples from the right upper and lower lobe of the lung, respectively. One lobe harbors EGFR exon19del mutation and EGFR amplification, whereas the other lobe carries ERBB2 V596D and EGFR G719A mutation. No other driver mutations were identified in the remaining cases. Interestingly, a novel TMD mutation I649R on ERBB3 was found in two patients together with ERBB2 V659D mutation, which might involve in the regulation of heterodimerization between ERBB2 and ERBB3. All these ERBB2 TMD mutations present at a relatively high mutant allele frequency (MAF) in tumor tissues, ranging from 15% to 71%, as well as liquid biopsy samples up to 47.5% of MAF, indicating a high tumor burden in these patients and potential ERBB2 amplification. Three patients received afatinib treatment though with progressive disease for various potential reasons, and the details of their treatment course will be presented.

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      Among Chinese patients, ERBB2 TMD mutation V659D/E is rare and unique to lung adenocarcinomas (0.14%). The efficacy of ERBB2-specific targeted therapy on these patients especially ERBB2 antibody and/or TKI need to be further investigated.

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