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Mary W. Redman



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    MS08 - Lung Cancer in the Real World (ID 787)

    • Event: WCLC 2018
    • Type: Mini Symposium
    • Track: Treatment in the Real World - Support, Survivorship, Systems Research
    • Presentations: 1
    • Now Available
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/24/2018, 13:30 - 15:00, Room 201 F
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      MS08.03 - Sources of Real World Data: Research Designs, Statistical Modelling and Quality Assurance Requirements (Now Available) (ID 11433)

      14:00 - 14:15  |  Presenting Author(s): Mary W. Redman

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

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    OA06 - Early Stage Lung Cancer: Outcomes and Interventions (ID 902)

    • Event: WCLC 2018
    • Type: Oral Abstract Session
    • Track: Treatment of Early Stage/Localized Disease
    • Presentations: 1
    • Now Available
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/24/2018, 13:30 - 15:00, Room 202 BD
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      OA06.01 - Case-Series Study in Ever- and Never-Smoking Females and Males with NSCLC: Exposures, Tumor Factors, Biology and Survival (SWOG S0424) (Now Available) (ID 14526)

      13:30 - 13:40  |  Author(s): Mary W. Redman

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background
      Sex differences in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) susceptibility, tumor biology and survival have been retrospectively reported. We conducted a prospective, case-series intergroup study (SWOG S0424) in 4 cohorts of females (F) and males (M), ever-smokers (ES) and never-smokers (NS) with newly-diagnosed stages I-III NSCLC. This is the first overall survival (OS) report. Method
      Patients were accrued at US sites via SWOG/NCI-CTSU. A questionnaire of demographics and exposures (tobacco, environmental, reproductive, hormonal); stage and histology data; treatment; and OS were obtained. Tumor tissue was submitted for EGFR, RAS and p53 mutations. Nuclear and cytoplasmic estrogen receptor (ER) alpha and beta were measured (Cheng, JNCI 2017). Kaplan-Meier (KM) curves and OS modeled using Cox proportional hazards were examined. The NS cohorts remained open longer to maximize accrual. Patients were followed 5 years for OS or until death. Result
      The accrual goal of 981 was achieved from 10/2005-3/2011. Evaluable cases were FES, n=337; MES, 383; FNS, 188; MNS, 49 (MNS under-accrued despite extension). The 4 cohorts differed significantly in demographics, tumor stage, histology, mutational profile (overall, by histology), ER expression, lifestyle factors and exposures. KM curves showed MNS/MES had overlapping OS and FNS/FES had significantly better OS. Five-year estimates were FNS, 73%; FES, 69%; MNS, 58%; MES, 52%. Markedly improved OS for females persisted after adjusting for other factors. Four multivariate OS models were constructed: all patients (model 1) and women only (model 2), each with mutations and ER expression added (models 3, 4). Model 1: better OS for females (HR 0.56, p <.001); higher BMI (continuous, HR 0.98, p=0.045); and adenocarcinoma, BAC, large cell (all vs squamous, HRs 0.84, 0.48, 0.57); worse OS for stages II and III (HRs 1.87, 3.76: each p<.001) and greater age. Model 2: worse OS if ES (HR 1.48, p=0.05), higher stages; histology and hormonal exposure variables were not significant. Model 3: better OS if EGFR mutation (HR 0.53, p=0.013), female, stage I, higher BMI or greater height; worse OS if p53 mutation, higher ER-alpha cytoplasmic or ER-beta nuclear H-scores. Model 4: worse OS if higher stage, p53 mutation or ER-alpha cytoplasmic H-score; EGFR mutation lost significance. Conclusion
      Sex, histology, mutations and exposures impacted OS, with dramatically better OS for females regardless of the analysis/model. Hormonal influences (persistent association of ER-expression with OS) were independently significant. Despite adjustments, favorable female survival could not be explained away. Randomized studies should stratify by sex and validation analyses should be conducted in targeted therapy and immunotherapy trials.

      SUPPORT: NIH/NCI grants R01CA106815, U10CA180888, U10CA180819 and UG1CA189974.

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    OA10 - Right Patient, Right Target & Right Drug - Novel Treatments and Research Partnerships (ID 910)

    • Event: WCLC 2018
    • Type: Oral Abstract Session
    • Track: Targeted Therapy
    • Presentations: 1
    • Now Available
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/25/2018, 10:30 - 12:00, Room 106
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      OA10.04 - Afatinib With or Without Cetuximab for EGFR-Mutant Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Safety and Efficacy Results from SWOG S1403 (Now Available) (ID 14014)

      11:05 - 11:15  |  Author(s): Mary W. Redman

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background

      Several EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are used for the treatment of EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), however resistance inevitably develops. The combination of the irreversible ErbB family TKI afatinib and the EGFR monoclonal antibody cetuximab was previously shown to overcome resistance to first-line EGFR TKIs. To attempt to delay resistance, we conducted a randomized trial of afatinib plus cetuximab versus afatinib alone in treatment-naïve patients with advanced EGFR-mutant NSCLC (NCT02438722).

      Method

      Patients with previously-untreated EGFR-mutant NSCLC were randomized to afatinib 40mg PO daily plus cetuximab 500mg/m2 IV every 2 weeks or afatinib 40mg PO daily. The study was designed to accrue a total of 212 patients, comparing progression-free survival (PFS) between the arms at the 1-sided 0.025 level when 134 PFS events had been observed. Secondary objectives included comparison of overall survival (OS), time to treatment discontinuation (TTD), and toxicity. An interim analysis evaluating early stopping for futility occurred when at least 64 PFS events were reported.

      Result

      Between March 26, 2015 and April 23, 2018, 170 eligible patients were accrued: 86 to afatinib/cetuximab and 84 to afatinib. Median age was 66.4 years, 66% were female, 64% had an EGFR exon 19 deletion mutation and 36% had an L858R point mutation. With 109 events observed, there was no improvement in PFS with the combination compared to single-agent (HR 1.17, 95% CI 0.80-1.73, P = 0.42, median 10.6 months vs 13.1 months). OS was also not improved with the addition of cetuximab (HR 1.23, 95% CI 0.62-2.44, P = 0.55, median 26.9 months vs not reached). TTD was similar between the two groups (HR 0.95, 95% CI 0.64-1.39, P = 0.79, median 12.5 months vs 12.2 months). Grade > 3 treatment-related adverse events (AEs) were more common among patients treated with afatinib/cetuximab, and more patients in the combination arm required at least 1 dose reduction of afatinib (57% vs 26%). However, treatment discontinuations due to AEs were similar between the two groups (11.6% vs 10.7%).

      Conclusion

      There was no difference in PFS, OS or TTD with the addition of cetuximab to afatinib for treatment-naïve patients with EGFR-mutant NSCLC. The trial was closed to accrual at the interim analysis having met the criteria for futility. Correlative analysis of tumor tissue and blood from patients is ongoing.

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    YI01 - Young Investigators Session (ID 988)

    • Event: WCLC 2018
    • Type: Young Investigator Session
    • Track:
    • Presentations: 1
    • Now Available
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/23/2018, 08:00 - 11:30, Room 106
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      YI01.10 - Knowing your Statistics (Now Available) (ID 14679)

      09:45 - 10:00  |  Presenting Author(s): Mary W. Redman

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

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