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Robert C. Doebele



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    MA02 - Improving Outcomes for Patients with Lung Cancer (ID 895)

    • Event: WCLC 2018
    • Type: Mini Oral Abstract Session
    • Track: Advanced NSCLC
    • Presentations: 1
    • Now Available
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/24/2018, 10:30 - 12:00, Room 201 BD
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      MA02.01 - ROS1 Gene Rearrangements Are Associated with an Exaggerated Risk of Peri-Diagnosis Thromboembolic Events (Now Available) (ID 12442)

      10:30 - 10:35  |  Author(s): Robert C. Doebele

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background

      Based on clinical observation, we hypothesized that ROS1 gene-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer (ROS1+ NSCLC) has a higher than expected thromboembolic event (TEE) rate. A multicenter, retrospective cohort study of TEE in advanced ROS1+, KRAS+, ALK+ and EGFR+ NSCLC was conducted.

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      Venous (DVT / PE) and arterial (MI/TIA/CVA) TEE within +/- 365 days of diagnosis of ROS1+, KRAS+, ALK+ or EGFR+ advanced NSCLC at 4 academic centers in USA and China from October 2002 to January 2018 were captured. The primary endpoint was the incidence of TEE in ROS1+ compared to KRAS+ NSCLC as a control group within +/- 90 days of diagnosis. Secondary endpoints compared TEE incidence between ROS1+ and ALK+, and ROS1+ and EGFR+. Fine-Gray Model was used to detect differences in TEE incidence while accounting for death as a competing risk.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      105 ROS1+, 101 ALK+, 112 EGFR+, and 114 KRAS+ NSCLC patients were enrolled. Incidence rate of TEE within +/- 90 days of diagnosis was 30.5% (32/105), 12.9% (13/101), 7.1% (8/112), and 12.3% (14/114) in the respective molecular cohorts. Compared to the ROS1+ cohort, the risk of TEE was significantly lower in the three other cohorts (KRAS+ HR 0.334, 95% CI: 0.18-0.62, p=0.001; ALK+ HR 0.357, 95% CI: 0.188-0.68, p=0.002; EGFR+ HR 0.193, 95% CI: 0.089-0.421, p<0.001) (Figure 1). First event TEEs were venous as opposed to arterial in 59.5% (22/37) ROS1+, 87.1% (27/31) ALK+, 80.6% (25/31) EGFR+, and 80% (16/20) KRAS+ cases. The median time (Interquartile Range) to TEE from the time of diagnosis for ROS1+/ALK+/EGFR+/ KRAS+ was 0 days (-6.75 to 7.0), 0 days (-20.0 to 35.0), 0.50 days (-43.7 to 21.3), and 13 days (0.49 to 32.0), respectively.

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      Among common molecular subtypes of NSCLC, ROS1+ oncogene is associated with a significantly higher risk of developing TEE within +/- 90 days of advanced NSCLC diagnosis.

      figure 1 ros1 90 day.tif

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    MA04 - Novel Approaches with IO (ID 900)

    • Event: WCLC 2018
    • Type: Mini Oral Abstract Session
    • Track: Immunooncology
    • Presentations: 1
    • Now Available
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/24/2018, 13:30 - 15:00, Room 107
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      MA04.09 - Neoadjuvant Atezolizumab in Resectable Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC): Updated Results from a Multicenter Study (LCMC3) (Now Available) (ID 12941)

      14:30 - 14:35  |  Author(s): Robert C. Doebele

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background

      Cisplatin-based chemotherapy, before or after surgery, provides only a 5% benefit in 5yr. OS in resectable NSCLC. A 20 patient study (NEJM April 2018) showed that preoperative immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy yielded a clinically meaningful major pathologic response rate (MPR ≤10% residual viable tumor cells) and did not delay or complicate surgery. This large multicenter trial measures MPR and biomarkers of benefit using neoadjuvant atezolizumab (atezo) [NCT02927301].

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      We planned 2 cycles of atezo (1200mg, days 1, 22) in patients with stages IB -selected IIIB resectable NSCLC prior to surgical resection (day 40 +/- 10). Chest CT, PET were planned pre-atezo and presurgery to assess response. Primary tumor +/- node biopsies and blood samples were obtained before atezo and presurgery for biomarker studies. The primary endpoint was MPR. Secondary endpoints included safety, response by PD-L1, OS, and DFS.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      For this updated efficacy and safety analysis (Feb’18 datacut), we report first 54 of 180 planned pts: 29 males, median age 65 yr, all ECOG 0-1; 17 current, 33 former smokers; 35 non-squamous NSCLC; clinical stages Ib/IIa/IIb/IIIa/IIIb = 5/11/13/20/5. Two pts received one dose of atezo due to treatment related AE (Gr 1 pyrexia, Gr 2 dyspnea) but underwent uncomplicated resection with MPR assessment. There was 1 unrelated Gr 5 AE (sudden cardiac death post surgical resection), 16 Gr 3-4 AEs (3 treatment related). Surgery was delayed in 1 pt due to Gr3 pneumonitis. By RECIST, 3 pts had PR, and 49 had SD. 50 pts underwent surgery and 47 pts had MPR assessment: 2 pts discontinued study preop due to radiographic PD and 2 discontinued due to other reasons; 3 pts had unresectable disease. MPR rate was 10/50 (20%, 95% CI 10-34%) including 3 pts who had pCR (no viable tumor cells) in the primary tumor. Excluding 5 pts who had known driver mutations (4 EGFR+, 1 ALK+), MPR rate was 10/45 (22%, 95% CI 11-37%). PD-L1 status was evaluable in 44/54 pts; 8/10 pts with MPR had PD-L1+ status and 2 had unknown PD-L1 status; 8/28 PDL-1 (+) patients had MPR (29%).

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      In a multicenter study, neoadjuvant atezo was well tolerated. MPR rate is encouraging. Clinical and pathological responses are often discordant. Correlative analyses on pre- and post atezo tissues are ongoing. Preliminary correlative analyses in blood samples are included in a separate abstract.

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    MA16 - Novel Mechanisms for Molecular Profiling (ID 917)

    • Event: WCLC 2018
    • Type: Mini Oral Abstract Session
    • Track: Advanced NSCLC
    • Presentations: 1
    • Now Available
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/25/2018, 13:30 - 15:00, Room 203 BD
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      MA16.11 - Discussant - MA 16.08, MA 16.09, MA 16.10 (Now Available) (ID 14647)

      14:40 - 14:55  |  Presenting Author(s): Robert C. Doebele

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

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    MS01 - Cancer Pathways, Targeted Therapy and Resistance (ID 780)

    • Event: WCLC 2018
    • Type: Mini Symposium
    • Track: Biology
    • Presentations: 1
    • Now Available
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/24/2018, 10:30 - 12:00, Room 206 F
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      MS01.04 - Addressing Drug Resistance Beyond Kinase Domain Mutations (Now Available) (ID 11404)

      11:30 - 11:50  |  Presenting Author(s): Robert C. Doebele

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

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    OA02 - Novel Therapies in ROS1, HER2 and EGFR (ID 893)

    • Event: WCLC 2018
    • Type: Oral Abstract Session
    • Track: Targeted Therapy
    • Presentations: 2
    • Now Available
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/24/2018, 10:30 - 12:00, Room 105
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      OA02.01 - Efficacy and Safety of Entrectinib in Locally Advanced or Metastatic ROS1 Fusion-Positive Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) (Now Available) (ID 13903)

      10:30 - 10:40  |  Presenting Author(s): Robert C. Doebele

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background

      Entrectinib is a central nervous system (CNS) active, potent, and selective inhibitor of ROS1, TRKA/B/C and ALK. Entrectinib is more potent against ROS1 than crizotinib, the only agent currently approved for the treatment of ROS1-positive NSCLC. Interim data demonstrated that entrectinib was tolerable and achieved high objective response rates (ORR) in patients with ROS1-positive, ROS1 inhibitor-naive NSCLC, including patients with baseline CNS disease (Ahn MJ WCLC 2017).

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      Phase 1/2 studies of entrectinib (ALKA, STARTRK-1, STARTRK-2; EudraCT 2012-000148-88; NCT02097810; NCT02568267) enrolled patients with locally advanced or metastatic solid tumors. The safety-evaluable population included patients who received ≥1 dose of entrectinib. The integrated efficacy analysis included ROS1-positive NSCLC patients enrolled based on identification of ROS1 fusions via nucleic acid-based diagnostic platforms. Safety was assessed by monitoring adverse events (AEs), laboratory tests, and physical examination. Tumor assessments were performed at the end of cycle 1 and every 8 weeks thereafter. All scans were submitted for blinded independent central review (BICR) using RECISTv1.1. Primary endpoints were ORR and duration of response (DOR) by BICR. Key secondary objectives were progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and safety. Additional endpoints evaluated in patients with baseline CNS disease were intracranial ORR (defined as complete or partial responses in patients with baseline CNS lesions per BICR using RECISTv1.1), intracranial DOR, and PFS. For intracranial assessments, the CNS subgroup was derived per BICR; for systemic analyses, the CNS subgroup was derived per investigator.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      There were 53 efficacy-evaluable patients with treatment-naïve, ROS1-positive NSCLC. BICR ORR was 77.4% (95% CI 63.8–87.7) with complete responses in three patients (5.7%); median BICR DOR was 24.6 months (95% CI 11.4–34.8). Per baseline CNS status (as determined by investigator), median BICR PFS was 26.3 months (95% CI 15.7–36.6) and 13.6 months (95% CI 4.5–NR) for patients without (n=30) and with CNS disease (n=23), respectively. Intracranial ORR was 55.0% (95% CI 31.5–76.9) and median intracranial DOR was 12.9 months (95% CI 5.6–not reached [NR]) in patients with baseline CNS disease per BICR (n=20). In the overall safety-evaluable population (n=355), most treatment-related AEs were grade 1–2. Few patients required dose reduction (27.3%) or discontinued treatment (3.9%) due to treatment-related AEs.

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      Entrectinib was tolerable with a manageable safety profile, and showed clinically meaningful, deep and durable systemic responses in ROS1-positive NSCLC. Clinically meaningful intracranial activity was also demonstrated in patients with baseline CNS disease.

      Study Sponsor: Ignyta, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd.

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      OA02.02 - Safety and Preliminary Clinical Activity of Ropotrectinib (TPX-0005), a ROS1/TRK/ALK Inhibitor, in Advanced ROS1 Fusion-Positive NSCLC (Now Available) (ID 14217)

      10:40 - 10:50  |  Author(s): Robert C. Doebele

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background

      Ropotrectinib is a potent ROS1/TRK/ALK inhibitor with a >90-fold greater ROS1 potency than crizotinib. Preclinical studies demonstrate robust activity against all known ROS1 resistance mutations, including solvent-front mutation G2032R.

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      In this Phase 1 study (NCT03093116), TKI-naïve and TKI-refractory (≥1 TKI) pts with advanced ALK/ROS1/TRK+ solid tumors received ropotrectinib. Asymptomatic brain metastases were allowed. Primary objectives were to determine MTD and RP2D, with safety, pharmacokinetics, and preliminary antitumor efficacy as the secondary objectives. This is a safety analysis of all pts and subgroup efficacy analysis of the ROS1+ NSCLC pts on the study.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      As of 16-April-2018, 72 pts have been treated at 6 dose levels from 40mg QD to 200mg BID. Most AEs were grade 1-2. Common (>10%) treatment-related AEs included dizziness (49%), dysgeusia (46%), paresthesias (29%), constipation (19%), fatigue (18%), nausea (11%), and anemia (11%). 4 DLTs were observed at ≥240mg/day: 1 grade 3 (Gr3) dyspnea/hypoxia, 2 Gr3 & 1 Gr2 dizziness. 31 of 72 pts had ROS1+ NSCLC by local testing (FISH, n=20; NGS, n=11) with 1 pt determined as ROS1-negative by central NGS. Antitumor activity in ROS1+ NSCLC has been observed at ROS1 dose levels 40mg QD-160mg BID per investigator assessment, with the best ORR 70% for TKI-naïve and 11% for TKI-refractory pts (17% for 1 prior TKI crizotinib, n=12) (Table). Two crizotinib-resistant pts with G2032R achieved durable cPR and cSD, respectively. Ongoing blinded independent review identified 7 evaluable pts with target CNS lesions at baseline; the intracranial best ORR was 43% (3 cPR, 1 PR*). Updated efficacy data and ctDNA biomarker analyses will be presented.

      Dose Level

      TKI Naïve (n = 10)

      TKI Refractory (n = 20)

      n

      Best Overall Response

      n

      Best Overall Response

      40 mg QD (n = 6)

      2

      2 cPR (ORR 100%)

      4

      2 cSD, 1 SD, 1 PD

      80 mg QD (n = 5)

      2

      2 cPR (ORR 100%)

      3

      1 cSD, 2 SD

      160 mg QD (n = 10)

      4

      2 cPR, 2 cSD (ORR 50%)

      6

      2 cPR, 2 cSD, 1 SD, 1 PD (ORR 33%)

      240 mg QD (n = 2)

      1

      1 cPR (ORR 100%)

      1

      1 SD

      160 mg BID (n = 7)

      1

      1 PR*

      6

      1 PR*, 1 SD*, 1 cSD, 2 SD, 1 NE

      Total (n = 30)

      10

      7 cPR, 1 PR*, 2 cSD

      20

      2 cPR, 1 PR*, 6 cSD, 1 SD*, 7 SD, 2 PD, 1 NE

      Best ORR

      70%

      11%

      Median follow-up

      8 months with 90% still on treatment

      4 months with 50% still on treatment

      cPR: confirmed partial response; SD: stable disease for 2 cycles; cSD: SD for at least 4 cycles; PR* or SD*: waiting for subsequent time point scan; PD: progressive disease; NE: inevaluable; ORR: objective response rate

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      Ropotrectinib is well tolerated and demonstrates promising activity in pts with advanced ROS1+ NSCLC, including TKI-naïve and TKI-refractory pts. RP2D has not yet been achieved. These Phase 1 data warrant further clinical testing of ropotrectinib in ROS1+ NSCLC.

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    OA10 - Right Patient, Right Target & Right Drug - Novel Treatments and Research Partnerships (ID 910)

    • Event: WCLC 2018
    • Type: Oral Abstract Session
    • Track: Targeted Therapy
    • Presentations: 1
    • Now Available
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/25/2018, 10:30 - 12:00, Room 106
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      OA10.02 - Oncogene-Driven Patient Groups: A New Era For Research Partnerships (Now Available) (ID 13519)

      10:40 - 10:50  |  Author(s): Robert C. Doebele

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background

      Genomic alterations drive more than 60% of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). About 20% of NSCLC cases (EGFR, ALK, ROS1, BRAF) will have an oncogenic driver that can be treated with approved targeted therapy drugs, and more have clinical trial options. In some cases, patients on targeted therapies will have years of good quality of life. However, targeted therapies do not cure, and these patients will eventually see their cancer progress. Patients and caregivers dealing with cancers driven by EGFR, ALK, ROS1 and Exon20 oncogenes have organized globally into online groups and are building partnerships that seek to provide support, increase awareness and education, accelerate and fund research, and improve access to effective diagnosis and treatment.

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      Each patient-caregiver group forms using social media, patient blogs, websites, fliers, newsletters, and contacts with clinicians. Each has a private Facebook group or other network to inform and educate patients and caregivers of approved and experimental treatments, share common experiences, provide information and tips from expert clinicians and researchers, and enable real-life connections. Each group sets its own priorities such as creating websites, raising funds for research, donating tissue, developing studies of demographics and treatment sequences, and creating biorepositories with annotated specimens that will be made widely available. These projects are accomplished in patient-driven partnership with researchers, clinicians, advocacy groups, and industry. None of the patient-caregiver groups are corporations or other types of legal entities.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      The ROS1ders focus on ROS1+ cancers of all types and include over 275 members from 21 countries across 8 cancer types. They have partnered in two studies to create ROS1+ cancer models. ALK Positive focuses on ALK+ NSCLC and other cancers, and includes over 1000 members from 38 countries. They have raised nearly $400,000 for research and will announce two grants in May. Exon 20 Group focuses on EGFR and HER2 insertions in Exon 20, and includes 110 members from 19 countries. They created an Exon 20 molecular tumor board and awarded two grants. The EGFR Resisters focus on EGFR+ NSCLC and cancers that develop resistance to EGFR targeted therapies, and include over 450 members from 20 countries.

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      Oncogene-driven patient-caregiver groups are creating a new paradigm in cancer research and have demonstrated that their partnerships with advocacy organizations, clinicians, researchers and industry, combined with social media outreach, can increase available patient data, specimens, cancer models and research funding for geographically distributed, oncogene-driven cancer populations.

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    OA12 - Novel Therapies in MET, RET and BRAF (ID 921)

    • Event: WCLC 2018
    • Type: Oral Abstract Session
    • Track: Targeted Therapy
    • Presentations: 1
    • Now Available
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/25/2018, 15:15 - 16:45, Room 106
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      OA12.06 - Mutational Landscape of BRAF V600E Positive Lung Cancer Patients Following BRAF Directed Therapy Failure (Now Available) (ID 13540)

      16:10 - 16:20  |  Author(s): Robert C. Doebele

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background

      BRAF V600E mutation is identified as molecular drivers in 1-2% of lung adenocarcinomas and predicts response to combination BRAF and MEK inhibitors. Little is known about molecular mechanisms of acquired resistance to these therapies for lung cancer patients with BRAF V600E mutations, partially due to a lack of representative cancer models.

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      We identified patients with BRAF V600E mutated lung cancer who were progressing after initial response to a BRAF/MEK inhibitor combination in 5 academic institutions in the US. Potential molecular mechanisms of resistance were explored by comparing pre- and post-therapy results from comprehensive tissue and/or the Guardant360 and FoundationACT plasma-based next generation sequencing assays.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      We identified 6 patients. Prior to treatment with a BRAF/MEK inhibitor combination, four patients had received at least one line of chemotherapy and immune checkpoint inhibitor monotherapy, one had received chemotherapy only and one was treatment naïve. Five patients received dabrafenib/trametinib and one vemurafenib/cobimetinib combination. All 6 patients achieved a partial response. Progression free survival (PFS) ranged from 3 to 15 months (median 9.5 months). At the time of progression, all patients had the BRAF V600E mutation re-identified in their samples. Additionally, there was one patient with a new AKT1 E17K and a new KRAS G12A mutation, one patient with a new VHL R167Q mutation and one patient with a new TP53 splice site indel mutation at the time of progression. Another two patients had AKT1 E17K mutations that were present prior to BRAF/MEK inhibitor therapy. They both had oligoprogression, one in lymph nodes and one in the brain after 5.2 and 3 months, respectively; both continued on dabrafenib and trametinib combination therapy after radiation treatment to the progressing sites. Interestingly, co-occurrence of AKT1 E17K and BRAF V600E mutations is rare in the TCGA data, but was identified in three of six patients in our case series. Finally, we have established a BRAF V600E positive lung adenocarcinoma cell line from a TKI naïve patient for further functional studies of drug resistance.

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      Comprehensive molecular testing can identify potential resistance mechanisms following progression of BRAF V600E positive lung cancer to TKI therapy. AKT1 mutations were common as co-alterations in BRAF V600E mutated lung adenocarcinoma before and after targeted therapy and may contribute to drug resistance. The development of patient-derived cell line models may assist in the identification and validation of drug resistance mechanisms, and may help devise strategies to overcome drug resistance.

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    P1.01 - Advanced NSCLC (Not CME Accredited Session) (ID 933)

    • Event: WCLC 2018
    • Type: Poster Viewing in the Exhibit Hall
    • Track:
    • Presentations: 1
    • Now Available
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/24/2018, 16:45 - 18:00, Exhibit Hall
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      P1.01-78 - The Incidence of Brain Metastases in ROS1-Rearranged Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer at Diagnosis and Following Progression on Crizotinib (Now Available) (ID 14164)

      16:45 - 18:00  |  Author(s): Robert C. Doebele

      • Abstract
      • Slides

      Background

      Central nervous system (CNS) metastases in lung cancer are a frequent cause of morbidity and mortality. There are conflicting data on the incidence of CNS metastases in ROS1+ NSCLC at diagnosis and rate of CNS progression on crizotinib.

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      Retrospective review of 579 patients with stage IV NSCLC between June 2008 to December 2017 was performed. We captured presence of brain metastases and oncogene status. We measured progression free survival (PFS) and time to CNS progression in ROS1+ and ALK+ patients on crizotinib.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      We identified 33 ROS1+ and 115 ALK+ patients with advanced NSCLC. The incidence of brain metastases for treatment-naïve ROS1+ and ALK+ NSCLC was 36% (12/33) and 34% (39/115) respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in incidence of brain metastases across all oncogene sub-groups. Complete survival data was available for 19 ROS1+ and 83 ALK+ patients. Median PFS for the ROS1+ and ALK+ cohort was 11 and 8 months (p = 0.304). The CNS was the first site of progression for 52% (10/19) ROS1+ NSCLC and 43% (36/83) ALK+ NSCLC with no significant differences between the groups (p = 0.610). Among patients without CNS metastases prior to crizotinib therapy, 50% of ROS1+ and ALK+ patients developed CNS metastases as only site of progression at 24 and 21 months respectively.

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      Brain metastases are common in treatment-naïve stage IV ROS1+ NSCLC, though incidence does not differ from other oncogene cohorts. The CNS is a common first site of progression in patients with ROS1+ NSCLC on crizotinib. This study reinforces the need to develop CNS-penetrant TKIs for patients with ROS1+ NSCLC, similar to ALK+ NSCLC.

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    P1.13 - Targeted Therapy (Not CME Accredited Session) (ID 945)

    • Event: WCLC 2018
    • Type: Poster Viewing in the Exhibit Hall
    • Track:
    • Presentations: 2
    • Now Available
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/24/2018, 16:45 - 18:00, Exhibit Hall
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      P1.13-36 - Randomized Phase 2 Trial of Seribantumab in Combination with Erlotinib in Patients with EGFR Wild-Type Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (Now Available) (ID 13960)

      16:45 - 18:00  |  Author(s): Robert C. Doebele

      • Abstract
      • Slides

      Background

      Seribantumab (MM-121) is a fully human IgG2 monoclonal antibody that binds to human epidermal growth factor receptor 3 (HER3/ErbB3), to block heregulin (HRG/NRG)-mediated ErbB3 signaling and induce receptor downregulation. This open-label, randomized Phase 1/2 study evaluated safety and efficacy of seribantumab in combination with erlotinib in advanced NSCLC. Here, we report the activity of seribantumab in combination with erlotinib, versus erlotinib alone, in patients with EGFR wild-type tumors and describe the potential predictive power of HRG.

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      Patients with EGFR wild-type NSCLC were assigned randomly to receive seribantumab plus erlotinib or erlotinib alone. Patients underwent pre-treatment core needle biopsy, and archived tumor samples were collected to support pre-specified biomarker analyses.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      One hundred twenty-nine patients received seribantumab/erlotinib (n=85) or erlotinib alone (n=44). Median estimated PFS in the unselected ITT population was 8.1 and 7.7 weeks in the experimental and control arm, respectively (HR=0.822; 95% CI, 0.37 to 1.828; P=0.63). In patients whose tumors had detectable HRG mRNA expression, treatment benefit was observed in the seribantumab/erlotinib combination (HR=0.35; 95% CI, 0.16 to 0.76; P=0.008). In contrast, in patients whose tumors were HRG negative, the HR was 2.15 (95% CI, 0.97 to 4.76; P = 0.059).

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      The addition of seribantumab to erlotinib did not result in improved PFS in unselected patients. However, pre-defined retrospective exploratory analyses suggest that detectable HRG mRNA levels identified patients who might benefit from seribantumab. An ongoing clinical trial is validating this finding in patients with advanced NSCLC and high HRG mRNA expression (NCT02387216).

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      P1.13-44 - Safety, PK, and Preliminary Antitumor Activity of the Oral EGFR/HER2 Exon 20 Inhibitor TAK-788 in NSCLC (ID 12373)

      16:45 - 18:00  |  Author(s): Robert C. Doebele

      • Abstract
      • Slides

      Background

      TAK-788 (AP32788) is an investigational tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) with potent, selective preclinical activity against activating EGFR and HER2 mutations, including exon 20 insertions. We report early results of a phase 1/2 first-in-human, open-label, multicenter study of TAK-788 (NCT02716116).

      a9ded1e5ce5d75814730bb4caaf49419 Method

      Patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) refractory to standard therapy received daily oral doses (5–120 mg) of TAK-788 in the ongoing dose-escalation phase (3+3 design). Preliminary antitumor activity (by RECIST v1.1), safety, and PK are reported for patients who received ≥1 dose.

      4c3880bb027f159e801041b1021e88e8 Result

      As of 8-Sep-2017, 34 patients (median age, 60 y; female, 65%; ≥2 prior anticancer therapies, 88%; Table) were treated with TAK-788; 10 remain on treatment at data cutoff. AUC0‑24,ss increased in a dose-proportional manner over the dose range evaluated; the effective t1/2 was ~16 (range 6–28) h. The most common treatment-emergent AEs (TEAEs; ≥20%) were diarrhea (47%), nausea (26%), and fatigue (21%). Grade ≥3 TEAEs in ≥2 patients (excluding disease progression) were dyspnea (n=3, 9%) and anemia, asthenia, dehydration, lung infection, pleural effusion, pneumonia, and pneumonitis (n=2 each, 6%). Two DLTs, both pneumonitis, were reported (80 mg, grade 3; 120 mg, grade 5). Of 14 evaluable patients, 3 had PR (80 mg, n=2, both confirmed; 120 mg, single PR awaiting confirmation), 6 had SD (40 mg, n=3; 80 mg, n=2; 120 mg, n=1), and 5 had PD as best response (40 mg, n=3; 80 mg, n=1; 120 mg, n=1). All patients with PR had EGFR exon 20 insertions.

      8eea62084ca7e541d918e823422bd82e Conclusion

      TAK-788 exhibits antitumor activity in patients with EGFR exon 20 insertions with an AE profile consistent with other EGFR TKIs. Phase 2 will begin after determination of the RP2D, with 4 molecularly defined cohorts in NSCLC. Updated data will be presented, including the recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D).

      Baseline Characteristics

      5 mg

      (n=4)

      10 mg

      (n=5)

      20 mg

      (n=5)

      40 mg

      (n=6)

      80 mg

      (n=7)

      120 mg

      (n=7)

      Total

      (n=34)

      Mutation type,a %

      Common EGFR mutations (exon 19 deletion / L8585R) 25 20 0 0 0 0 6
      EGFR-T790M+ 0 0 0 0 14 0 3
      EGFR exon 20 insertion 50 40 60 83 71 57 62
      HER2 0 20 40 17 14 29 21
      a One patient (20 mg) had both EGFR and HER2 mutations; 1 patient (80 mg) had EGFR exon 20 insertion + T790M.

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