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J. Miao



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    OA 14 - New Paradigms in Clinical Trials (ID 681)

    • Event: WCLC 2017
    • Type: Oral
    • Track: Clinical Design, Statistics and Clinical Trials
    • Presentations: 1
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      OA 14.07 - Progress in Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma from the Lung-MAP Master Protocol (S1400) Sub-Studies S1400A, S1400B, S1400C and S1400D (ID 9593)

      11:00 - 12:30  |  Author(s): J. Miao

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background:
      Lung-MAP (S1400) is a master umbrella protocol designed to establish genomic screening for previously treated squamous cell lung cancer patients (SqCCA), and independently evaluate targeted therapies with matching biomarkers and alternative therapies (designated non-match therapy) in patients without putative markers. The protocol opened June 16, 2014 with four biomarker-driven sub-studies and one non-match sub-study.

      Method:
      Eligibility stipulated advanced SqCCA, progressing after at least one prior platinum-based chemotherapy, PS 0–2, and EGFR/ALK wild-type. Tumor samples were required and analyzed for gene alterations by FoundationOne NGS assay (Foundation Medicine). The original biomarker and non-match studies were: S1400B evaluating taselisib for PI3K mutations, S1400C evaluating palbociclib for cell cycle gene alterations (CCGA), S1400D evaluating AZD4547 for FGFR mutations, S1400E evaluating rilotumumab and erlotinib for c-MET positive tumors, and S1400A evaluating durvalumab in patients with no matching biomarkers. The original design included randomization to a control arm, but was amended to a single-arm phase 2 design. The primary endpoint for each modified sub-study was response.

      Result:
      As of June 16, 2017 all original sub-studies have been closed to accrual; 1298 patients registered to the screening component of the trial and 486 patients have registered to a sub-study. Two new sub-studies have been launched and are currently accruing. Details of the completed sub-studies are included in the table.

      Sub-study Final Accrual Biomarker prevalence/% of sub-study registrations Closure Date Response to investigational therapy N (%) Status
      S1400A (non-match) Total: 116 Durvalumab: 78 Docetaxel: 38 NA/59% 12/18/15 Docetaxel arm closed: 4/22/15 11 (16%) Administratively closed to enable activation of new non-match study.
      S1400B PI3K Total: 39 taselisib: 31 Docetaxel: 8 8%/9% 12/12/16 Docetaxel arm closed: 12/18/15 1 (4%) Closed at interim futility analysis.
      S1400C (CCGA+) Total: 54 Palbociclib: 37 Docetaxel: 17 19%/15% 09/01/16 Docetaxel arm closed: 12/18/15 2 (6%) Closed at interim futility analysis.
      S1400D (FGFR+) Total: 45 AZD4547: 35 Docetaxel: 10 16%/12% 10/31/16 Docetaxel arm closed: 12/18/15 2 (7%) Closed at interim futility analysis.
      S1400E (MET+) Total: 9 R+E: 4 E: 5 N/A (closed too early) 11/26/2014 N/A Closed d/t discontinuation of development of rilotumumab


      Conclusion:
      Lung-MAP as a master genomic screening protocol has demonstrated feasibility with respect to accrual and evaluation of targeted therapies in lower prevalence patient populations. This dynamic, centralized, single-IRB platform is well positioned to efficiently assess multiple novel therapeutics for advanced SqCCA patients.

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    P3.01 - Advanced NSCLC (ID 621)

    • Event: WCLC 2017
    • Type: Poster Session with Presenters Present
    • Track: Advanced NSCLC
    • Presentations: 1
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      P3.01-046 - Longitudinal Analysis of Plasma CtDNA in EGFR-Mutant NSCLC: SWOG S1403 Trial of Afatinib with or Without Cetuximab (ID 9535)

      09:30 - 16:00  |  Author(s): J. Miao

      • Abstract

      Background:
      Detection of actionable mutations using circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) isolated from patient plasma is now accepted as clinical practice in NSCLC. Nevertheless, the full extent to which longitudinal plasma analysis can be utilized to guide clinical decision-making has yet to be realized. We prospectively incorporated serial next-generation sequencing (NGS) of ctDNA into the ongoing SWOG S1403 clinical trial (NCT02438722) of afatinib+cetuximab vs afatinib in treatment-naïve NSCLC patients with EGFR-mutant tumors.

      Method:
      Time points for specimen collection were pre-treatment, after two months of therapy on Cycle 3 Day1 (C3D1) and at progression. Objectives were to: 1) determine the prognostic and predictive significance the EGFR mutant allele frequency (MAF) at each time point; 2) correlate changes in MAF over time with regard to patient outcome, and 3) identify putative emergent resistance mechanisms and companion mutations. Specimen analysis was conducted using the Guardant360 73-gene digital NGS panel.

      Result:
      To date, 53 patients with advanced EGFR-mutant NSCLC have contributed baseline samples. Of these, 46 had ctDNA detectable at baseline (87%). 39 of these 46 (85%) had detectable, tissue-identical EGFR mutations, for an overall EGFR detection rate of 74% (39/53). A positive finding for EGFR amplification (Amp) in plasma correlated with high ctDNA MAF: median for Amp 16.9 vs nonAmp 0.9 (range/n: 11.6-43.7/10 vs 0.11-7.7/17; p<0.0001). Of patients with detectable EGFR mutation at baseline, 27 had analyzable ctDNA collected at C3D1. Of these, 26/27 showed decreasing MAFs on-treatment (mean for baseline: 9.8 vs C3D1: 0.14; p<0.0001), with 20 cases having no detectable EGFR mutation at C3D1 (mean of 7 positives at C3D1: 0.55). At progression, samples were collected from 14 patients and 10 had EGFR mutations detectable, with T790M present in 3. Another patient had an FGFR3 fusion at PD, but no previous draws were available to determine if it was emergent.

      Conclusion:
      Longitudinal analysis of plasma ctDNA in S1403 patients demonstrated significant treatment-induced changes in mutation burden and identified resistance mechanisms at progression. EGFR gene amplification, as assessed in plasma, was significantly associated with increased ctDNA MAFs. Patients showed a significant, one-to-two orders of magnitude decline in EGFR MAF after two months of therapy, with 74% dropping below detectable levels. At progression, EGFR mutation detection rates increased, often concomitantly with a putative emergent resistance factor. Accrual to S1403 is ongoing and patient treatment and outcomes remain blinded. The prognostic and predictive utility of baseline and therapy-induced changes in ctDNA MAF kinetics will be determined at study unblinding.