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M. Hatton



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    MA 09 - The Current Status of Radiation Oncology (ID 666)

    • Event: WCLC 2017
    • Type: Mini Oral
    • Track: Locally Advanced NSCLC
    • Presentations: 1
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      MA 09.11 - Isotoxic Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) – a Feasibility Study (ID 7978)

      11:00 - 12:30  |  Author(s): M. Hatton

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background:
      The majority of stage III patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are unsuitable for concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Alternative treatment options include sequential chemoradiotherapy and radiotherapy (RT) alone. As the rate of local failure is high there is a rationale for treatment intensification.

      Method:
      Isotoxic Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) is a multicentre feasibility study combining a number of intensification strategies; dose escalation, acceleration and hyperfractionation. Patients with inoperable stage III NSCLC, ECOG performance status (PS) 0-2, unsuitable for concurrent chemoradiotherapy were recruited. A minimum of 2 cycles of induction chemotherapy was mandated before RT. The dose of radiation was increased until one or more of the organs at risk (OAR) met predefined constraints or the maximum dose of 79.2Gy was reached. RT was delivered twice-daily in 1.8 Gy fractions. A RT quality assurance programme was in place. The primary end point was feasibility (>80% of patients achieving >60Gy EQD2 i.e. total biologically equivalent in 2 Gy fraction), with acute/late toxicity (CTCAE version 4.0), local control and overall survival as secondary end points.

      Result:
      Between June 2014 and March 2016, 37 patients were enrolled from 7 UK centres. Median age = 67 years (range 46-86). Male:female ratio = 18:19. ECOG PS=0, 5 (13.51%), PS=1, 29 (78.38%), PS=2, 3 (8.11%). Stage IIIa:IIIb ratio 23 (62.2%):14 (37.8%). Out of 37 patients, 2(5.4%) failed to achieve EQD2 >60Gy due to large tumour size and inability to meet OAR constraints, they received standard RT. This was due to large tumour size and inability to meet OAR constraints. Median prescribed tumour dose was 77.4Gy (61.2 – 79.2Gy) with the maximum dose of 79.2Gy delivered to 14 (37.8%) patients. All patients completed RT as scheduled except one due to disease progression. Grade (G)3 acute toxicities included: dysphagia 1 (2.9%), dypsnoea 2 (5.7%), lung infection 3 (5.7%) and radiation oesophagitis 2 (5.7%). There were three G5 events: radiation pneumonitis, trachea-oesophageal fistula and bronchopulmonary haemorrhage, which were probably treatment related. G3 late toxicities included: fatigue 1 (2.9%), dyspnoea 3 (8.6%) and 1 (2.9%) case of late G4 lung infection. At time of analysis median follow-up was 12.8 months for 20 survivors. Overall survival and progression-free survival at 1 year was 75% and 59% respectively.

      Conclusion:
      In the majority, treatment intensification using isotoxic IMRT is feasible. This regime will be tested alongside other intensified treatments against standard sequential chemoradiotherapy in the ADSCAN study (ISRCTN47674500).

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    OA 02 - Mesothelioma: Challenges For New Treatment (ID 653)

    • Event: WCLC 2017
    • Type: Oral
    • Track: Mesothelioma
    • Presentations: 1
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      OA 02.03 - Prophylactic Irradiation of Tracts (PIT) in Patients with Pleural Mesothelioma: Results of a Multicentre Phase III Trial (ID 7980)

      11:00 - 12:30  |  Author(s): M. Hatton

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background:
      It has been widespread practice across Europe to irradiate diagnostic or therapeutic chest wall (CW) intervention sites in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) post-procedure - a practice known as prophylactic irradiation of tracts (PIT). This study aims to determine the efficacy of PIT in reducing the incidence of CW metastases following a chest wall procedure in MPM.

      Method:
      In this multicentre phase III randomised controlled trial, MPM patients following a chest wall procedure were randomised 1: 1 to receive PIT (within 42-days of procedure) or no PIT. Large thoracotomies, needle biopsy sites and indwelling pleural catheters were excluded. PIT was delivered at a dose of 21Gy in 3 fractions over 3 consecutive weekdays using a single electron field adapted to maximise coverage of the tract from skin surface to pleura. The primary outcome was the incidence of CW metastases within 6 months from randomisation, assessed in the intention-to-treat population. Stratification factors included epitheloid histology and intention to give chemotherapy. Trial registration number NCT01604005.

      Result:
      375 patients (186 PIT and 189 no PIT) were randomised between 06/2012-12/2015 from 54 UK centres. Comparing PIT vs no PIT, %male patients was 89.8/88.4%, median age 72.8/74.6 years, %ECOG PS (0,1,2) 32.2,56.5,11.3/23.8,56.1,20.1%, %confirmed epithelioid histology 79.6/74.1%, and %with intention to give chemotherapy 71.5/71.4%. The chest wall procedures were VATS (58.1/51.3%), open surgical biopsy (2.7/5.3%), local-anaesthetic-thoracoscopy (26.9/27.0%), chest drain (5.9/8.5%) and others (6.5/7.9%) for the PIT vs no PIT arm respectively. Radiotherapy was received as intended by 181/186 patients in the PIT arm. The proportion of CW metastases by 6 months was 6/186 (3.2%) vs 10/189 (5.3%) for the PIT vs no PIT arm respectively (odds ratio 0.60 [95% CI 0.17-1.86]; p=0.44) and by 12 months 15/186 (8.1%) versus 19/189 (10.1%) respectively (OR=0.79 [95% CI 0.36-1.69];p=0.59). Cumulative incidence of CW metastases at 6months/12 months/24 months was 3.3/8.5/10.0% in the PIT arm vs 5.6/10.9/18.7% in the no PIT arm. Evaluable patients who developed CW metastases reported a mean increase in visual analogue scale pain score of 13.3 (p<0.01) compared to baseline. Skin toxicity was the most common radiotherapy-related adverse event in the PIT arm with 96(51.6%) grade 1, 19(10.2%) grade 2, and 1(0.5%) grade 3 radiation dermatitis (CTCAE V4.0). There were no other grade 3 or higher radiotherapy-related adverse events.

      Conclusion:
      There is no role for the routine use of PIT following diagnostic or therapeutic CW procedures in patients with MPM.

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