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B. Glisson



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    MA 01 - SCLC: Research Perspectives (ID 650)

    • Event: WCLC 2017
    • Type: Mini Oral
    • Track: SCLC/Neuroendocrine Tumors
    • Presentations: 1
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      MA 01.03 - The Potential of ctDNA Sequencing in Disease Monitoring and Depicting Genomic Evolution of Small-Cell Lung Cancer Under Therapy (ID 9682)

      11:00 - 12:30  |  Author(s): B. Glisson

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background:
      Although small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is sensitive to initial therapy, almost all patients relapse and survival remains poor. Outgrowth of treatment-resistant subclones could be responsible for recurrence. However, genomic evolution of SCLC after treatment hasn’t been well investigated, partially due to the challenge of obtaining longitudinal samples. CT is the standard modality for response assessment and disease monitoring. But it doesn’t always accurately assess the disease status. SCLC is characterized by early hemagenous spread, which makes circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) analysis a promising modality for genomic profiling and disease monitoring of SCLC.

      Method:
      Targeted-capture deep sequencing (mean target coverage 538x-1866x) of 545 cancer genes was performed to 44 ctDNA samples collected before therapy as baseline and at different timepoints during treatment from 23 SCLC patients. Pretreatment tumor biopsies from 8 patients were also sequenced (mean target coverage 348x-1281x) of the same gene panel. DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells was served as the germline control.

      Result:
      Mutations were identified in all 44 ctDNA samples with a median of 16 mutations per sample (average mutation burden of 6.6/Mb). TP53 and RB1 were the most frequently mutated genes, detected in 91% (21/23) and 65% (15/23) patients, respectively. 74 mutations were identified from the 8 tumor biopsies, among which, 69 (93.2%) were detected in matched ctDNA. We inferred subclonal architecture of each ctDNA sample based on cancer cell fraction derived using PyClone. A median of 10 (ranging 2-26) subclones was inferred from each ctDNA sample and only 17% (2% to 60.%) of mutations were clonal mutations suggesting substantial genomic heterogeneity. Single gene mutations were not associated with survival. However, mean variant allele frequency of clonal mutations (clonal-VAF) at baseline was associated with progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) independent of stage, age, or platinum sensitivity. The median PFS of patients with higher versus lower than median clonal-VAF was 5.2 months (95% CI, 4.6 to 5.8 months) versus 10.0 months (95% CI, 9.3 to 10.7 months), p=0.002. The median OS was 8.1 months (95% CI, 5.5 to 10.7 months) versus 24.9 months (95% CI, 0.0 to 51.2 months) in patients with higher versus lower than median clonal-VAF, respectively, p=0.004. Analysis of serial ctDNA before and during treatment showed that clonal-VAF closely tracked closely with treatment responses.

      Conclusion:
      ctDNA sequencing is a promising modality for genomic profiling and disease monitoring for SCLC patients. Clonal VAF may be a better ctDNA metric than single gene mutations.

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    P2.07 - Immunology and Immunotherapy (ID 708)

    • Event: WCLC 2017
    • Type: Poster Session with Presenters Present
    • Track: Immunology and Immunotherapy
    • Presentations: 1
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      P2.07-062b - DNA Damage Repair Targeting Upregulates PD-L1 Level and Potentiates the Effect of PD-L1 Blockade in Small Cell Lung Cancer (ID 9733)

      09:30 - 16:00  |  Author(s): B. Glisson

      • Abstract
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

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    P2.15 - SCLC/Neuroendocrine Tumors (ID 716)

    • Event: WCLC 2017
    • Type: Poster Session with Presenters Present
    • Track: SCLC/Neuroendocrine Tumors
    • Presentations: 1
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      P2.15-016a - Exploiting G2-M Cell Cycle Checkpoint Dependency in Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC) by Targeting Checkpoint Kinase 1 (CHK1) (ID 9680)

      09:30 - 16:00  |  Author(s): B. Glisson

      • Abstract

      Abstract not provided

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    P3.03 - Chemotherapy/Targeted Therapy (ID 719)

    • Event: WCLC 2017
    • Type: Poster Session with Presenters Present
    • Track: Chemotherapy/Targeted Therapy
    • Presentations: 1
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      P3.03-007 - LCMC2: Expanded Profiling of Lung Adenocarcinomas Identifies ROS1 and RET Rearrangements and TP53 Mutations as a Negative Prognostic Factor (ID 8338)

      09:30 - 16:00  |  Author(s): B. Glisson

      • Abstract
      • Slides

      Background:
      The Lung Cancers Mutation Consortium (LCMC) is a multi-institutional effort where 16 sites identify oncogenic drivers and pool data to assess the impact of targeted therapies in patients with lung adenocarcinomas. We now report the results of the second patient cohort (LCMC2) with an expanded multiplex molecular panel to include RET and ROS1 and tumor suppressors.

      Method:
      904 patients with centrally confirmed stage IV lung adenocarcinomas who were candidates for therapy had at least one of 14 oncogenic drivers assessed in a CLIA-compliant laboratory using genotyping, FISH, massively parallel sequencing (NGS), and immunohistochemistry (IHC) analyses.

      Result:
      Among 423 patients tested for all 14 targets, we found a driver in 65%. Mutated KRAS was found in 31%, sensitizing EGFR in 14%, MET amplification in 5%, ALK rearrangements in 4%, BRAF V600E in 3%, and HER2 in 3%. Rearrangements in RET and ROS1 were each found in 2% (CI 1 to 3%). Using IHC, PTEN loss was found in 8% (CI 6 to 11%) and MET expression in 58% (CI 55 to 61%). Use of targeted therapies in patients with EGFR, HER2, or BRAF mutations, ALK, ROS1, or RET rearrangements, and MET amplification was associated with a gain in overall survival of 1.5 years relative to those with the same drivers not receiving targeted therapy and a gain of 1 year relative to those without an actionable driver. Current and former cigarette smokers derived a survival benefit from targeted therapies similar to never smokers (p=0.975). Among 154 patients who had all drivers assessed and NGS testing in addition, any TP53 mutation was associated with poorer survival among those with EGFR, ALK, or ROS1 (p=0.014). STK11 was detected in 11%, all in patients with KRAS mutations.

      Conclusion:
      Using an expanded testing panel, LCMC2 demonstrates the survival benefit of matching targeted treatments to oncogenic drivers in patients with lung adenocarcinomas, identifies additional prognostic factors, and supports the performance of multiplex molecular testing on specimens from all individuals with lung adenocarcinomas irrespective of clinical characteristics. We detected either MET amplifications or HER2 mutations in 7%, together more than the 4% with ALK. A targeted drug is available in the United States for 35% of patients with lung adenocarcinomas. The routine use of massively parallel sequencing (NGS) detects both targetable drivers and tumor suppressor genes that have significance for therapy selection and prognosis. Supported by Free to Breathe

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