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J. Mostel



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    MA 04 - Advocacy: Listen to the Patients (ID 655)

    • Event: WCLC 2017
    • Type: Mini Oral
    • Track: Patient Advocacy
    • Presentations: 1
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      MA 04.05 - The Impact of the Meso Foundation on Advocacy Efforts for Funding Mesothelioma Research  (ID 7462)

      11:00 - 12:30  |  Author(s): J. Mostel

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background:
      The Mesothelioma Applied Research Foundation is the nonprofit collaboration of patients and families, physicians, advocates, and researchers dedicated to eradicating the life-ending and vicious effects of mesothelioma. The Meso Foundation’s Advocacy Program objective is to obtain federal funding for mesothelioma research.

      Method:
      An analysis was performed of the Meso Foundation’s advocacy efforts and grant funding from years 2000- 2015.

      Result:
      The Meso Foundation has funded 103 projects from 8 countries for a total awarded amount of 9.8 million dollars. From 2000- 2015, the Meso Foundation grant program has funded research that has produced over 240 publications in peer reviewed journals. As a direct result of Foundation advocacy, the Department of Defense has awarded a total of $12.4 million to mesothelioma research since 2008. The Meso Foundation’s grant program has funded the basic science research that helped lay the groundwork for several mesothelioma clinical trials. A few of the more notable trials include the measles virus and the WTI Vaccine. Several of the proposals funded by Meso Foundation grants have extended to global levels through presentations at international conferences including but not limited to International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC), American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), and American Association for Cancer Research (AACR).

      Conclusion:
      Through actively engaging members of congress, the Meso Foundation has successfully advocated for increased funding for mesothelioma research. The Meso Foundation is committed to leveraging the knowledge we gain from our own research, as well as discoveries made by our collaborations with academic institutions and industry partners to work toward the development of innovative treatments and care platforms for mesothelioma patients and their families.

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    P1.10 - Nursing/Palliative Care/Ethics (ID 696)

    • Event: WCLC 2017
    • Type: Poster Session with Presenters Present
    • Track: Nursing/Palliative Care/Ethics
    • Presentations: 1
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      P1.10-007 - Preparing Mesothelioma Patients for Treatment: Providing Psychosocial Support Networks (ID 7465)

      09:30 - 16:00  |  Author(s): J. Mostel

      • Abstract

      Background:
      As medical developments advance and individuals with mesothelioma are increasingly surviving outside of the mean, the mental health impacts of their diagnosis and of treatment on the patient remain critical to examine. Malignant Mesothelioma, with a latency period of approximately 20-40 years, has not shown a downward trend in deaths for the past 15 years (CDC). As treatment for mesothelioma continues to advance, the overall survival of MPM patients has increased. With the growing number of surviving patients, it is essential to begin a conversation about mental health impacts, such as depression, anxiety, or PTSD, as they can be detrimental to a patient’s quality of life and survivorship.

      Method:
      We performed a literature review of the current DSM standards for temporary depression and anxiety in terminal illness, and drew recommendations about how to move forward in further discussing cancer-related PTSD and other psychosocial impacts of cancer diagnosis/treatment.

      Result:
      Individuals who experience the full diagnostic criteria for PTSD after a cancer diagnosis ranges from 3-4% for patient in early stages of cancer, to 35% for in patients who have completed active treatment. PTSDlike symptoms have been expressed in 20% of early stage patient experience and 80% of patients with recurrent cancer.

      Conclusion:
      Psychosocial advancements in mesothelioma patients need to be continually developed as medical treatments advance. Many feelings of anxiety and depression can be connected to treatment distress, and cancer-related PTSD needs to be viewed through the lens of diagnosis and treatment trauma. Anxiety, depression, and PTSD must be considered from a distinctive angle for cancer-related mental health issues; while symptoms for these mental health issues can be similar, the trauma of terminal illness is unlike other traumas. While we understand that mental health services are not a priority in underdeveloped countries, the advancement of psychosocial support networks should be a priority in treatment within developed countries to set a precedent. There must be a stronger emphasis on psychosocial research on patients in remission (NED), and to create programs to support patients that are not in active treatment. Support groups are one resource that can be thoroughly utilized, but psychosocial support networks should not be limited to support groups; programs need to be developed that are tailored to each individual’s mental health issues, to sooth their anxieties, and providing coping mechanisms. Because of the distinctive void in psychosocial support networks as a whole, this is an excellent opportunity for international collaboration to improve survivorship standards in patients. Future steps should revolve around the priority of psychosocial support network discussions. Patient care needs to prioritize the mental health issues that result from the trauma of cancer diagnosis, and programs must be in place to further support the higher quality of life patients can experience.