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J. Li



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    Poster Display Session (ID 63)

    • Event: ELCC 2017
    • Type: Poster Display Session
    • Track:
    • Presentations: 2
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 5/07/2017, 12:30 - 13:00, Hall 1
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      123P - A retrospective study in Chinese patients: Is there a role of nanoparticle albumin bound paclitaxel in advanced NSCLC? (ID 393)

      12:30 - 13:00  |  Author(s): J. Li

      • Abstract

      Background:
      We aimed to report the safety and short-term efficacy of nanoparticle albumin bound paclitaxel (Nab-PTX) in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in Chiina as a second line and later treatment, and explored its efffcacy affected by previous paclitaxel treatment wether or not.

      Methods:
      Advanced NSCLC patients who failed in prior treatment and received weekly Nab-PTX regimen on days 1, 8 (a dose of 130 mg/m2/week) treatment were included. The primary efficacy endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). Toxicity was evaluated with NCI-CTCAE 3.0.

      Results:
      A total of 98 patients at the Cancer Institute & Hospital of the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (Beijing, China) between June 2010 and July 2015 were enrolled. The median PFS and overall survival (OS) were 4.34 months (95% CI 3.508 to 5.165 months) and 11.73 months (95% CI 9.211 to 14.247 months), respectively. PFS was no significant difference between patients with previous paclitaxel treatment and without previous paclitaxel treatment (median, 4.11 versus 4.53 months, respectively, p = 0.195). OS was also no significant difference between the two arms (median, 9.69 versus 14.62 months, respectively, p = 0.190). The objective responses rate (ORR) and disease control rate (DCR) of all patients were 22.4% and 74.5%, respectively. The ORR and DCR were 23.0% and 70.5%, respectively in one arm with previous paclitaxel treatment, while in another arm without previous paclitaxel treatment, the results were 21.6% and 81.1%. No significant difference in ORR (p = 0.533) and DCR (p = 0.244) between the two arms. Grade 3 or higher adverse events (AEs) of all patients was neutropenia (25.5%), leukopenia (12.4%), peripheral neuropathy (5.1%), myalgia/arthralgia (5.1%), anaemia (3.1%), and fatigue (1.0%), respectively.

      Conclusions:
      The Nab-PTX was effective and well tolerated as second line or later treatment in advanced NSCLC patients. Even used paclitaxel treatment previously did not affect the efficacy and PFS of Nab-PTX.

      Clinical trial identification:
      Preview and Finish

      Legal entity responsible for the study:
      Junling Li

      Funding:
      Junling Li

      Disclosure:
      All authors have declared no conflicts of interest.

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      70P - A retrospective analysis to explore the value of gemcitabine combined with cisplatin as adjuvant chemotherapy of NSCLC (ID 375)

      12:30 - 13:00  |  Author(s): J. Li

      • Abstract

      Background:
      To evaluate the value of gemcitabine combined with cisplatin (GP) as adjuvant chemotherapy in radical resection of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

      Methods:
      This study reviewed the 100 patients’ charts with radical resection of NSCLC treated with cisplatin/gemcitabine as adjuvant chemotherapy between June 2007 and December 2010 in CAMS (Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences).

      Results:
      Among the 100 cases, eighty-two (82%) was male and the median age was 59 years (range, 36-73 years). Forty-two (42%) patients were adenocarcinoma, while fifty-five (55%) were squamous cell carcinoma. Most patients had pathologic IIB (29%) and IIIA (44%) stage disease, whereas others were IA (2%), IB (14%), IIA (6%), and IIIB (5%). Surgical methods included sleeve resection (12%), pneumonectomy (14%), and lobectomy (73%).The completion rate of 4 cycles of chemotherapy was 85%, of which 76 case (76%) completed the planned full-dose chemotherapy. And the main reason for the reduction in gemcitabine doses in thirteen patients were grade 3/4 myelosuppression, mainly neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. The median dose and dose intensity were 8377.1 mg/m[2] and 708 mg/(m[2]·week) for gemcitabine, and 293.38 mg/m[2] and 25.24 mg/(m[2]·week) for cisplatin respectively. With good compliance to treatment, toxicities observed were tolerable and managable. During a median follow-up duration of 73.1 months, the median disease-free survival(DFS) was 33.8 months (95%CI: 15.938-51.676). Patients with the squamous cell carcinoma (HR 0.404, 95% CI 0.241-0.676, P = 0.001) and pathologic stage I (HR 4.379, 95% CI 1.721-11.142, P = 0.002) were associated with better DFS from univariate and multivariate analyses. The survival rate at 1 year, 2 years and 5 years was 94%, 77% and 55%, while the survival rate without recurrence was 64%, 53% and 39% respectively.

      Conclusions:
      As one of the adjuvant chemotherapy regimens, gemcitabine combined with cisplatin is well tolerated. Patients with squamous cell carcinomas or stage I can benefit from it better.

      Clinical trial identification:


      Legal entity responsible for the study:
      None

      Funding:
      None

      Disclosure:
      All authors have declared no conflicts of interest.