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J. Mazieres



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    MA16 - Novel Strategies in Targeted Therapy (ID 407)

    • Event: WCLC 2016
    • Type: Mini Oral Session
    • Track: Chemotherapy/Targeted Therapy/Immunotherapy
    • Presentations: 1
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      MA16.03 - Global RET Registry (GLORY): Activity of RET-Directed Targeted Therapies in RET-Rearranged Lung Cancers (ID 4325)

      14:20 - 15:50  |  Author(s): J. Mazieres

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background:
      GLORY is a global registry of patients with RET-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In order to complement ongoing prospective studies, the registry’s goal is to provide data on the efficacy of RET-directed targeted therapies administered outside the context of a clinical trial. We previously reported results from our first interim analysis (Gautschi, ASCO 2016). Following additional accrual into the registry, updated results are presented here, with a focus on an expanded efficacy analysis of various RET inhibitors.

      Methods:
      A global, multicenter network of thoracic oncologists identified patients with pathologically-confirmed NSCLC harboring a RET rearrangement. Molecular profiling was performed locally via RT-PCR, FISH, or next-generation sequencing. Anonymized data including clinical, pathologic, and molecular features were collected centrally and analyzed by an independent statistician. Response to RET tyrosine kinase inhibition (TKI) administered off-protocol was determined by RECIST1.1 (data cutoff date: April 15, 2016). In the subgroup of patients who received RET TKI therapy, the objectives were to determine overall response rate (ORR, primary objective), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS).

      Results:
      165 patients with RET-rearranged NSCLC from 29 centers in Europe, Asia, and the USA were accrued. The median age was 61 years (range 28-89 years). The majority of patients were female (52%), never smokers (63%), with lung adenocarcinomas (98%) and advanced disease (91%). The most frequent metastasic sites were lymph nodes (82%), bone (51%) and lung (32%). KIF5B-RET was the most commonly identified fusion (70%). 53 patients received at least one RET-TKI outside of a clinical protocol, including cabozantinib (21), vandetanib (11), sunitinib (10), sorafenib (2), alectinib (2), lenvatinib (2), nintedanib (2), ponatinib (2) and regorafenib (1). In patients who were evaluable for response (n=50), the ORR was 37% for cabozantinib, 18% for vandetanib, and 22% for sunitinib. Median PFS was 3.6, 2.9, and 2.2 months and median OS was 4.9, 10.2, and 6.8 months for cabozantinib, vandetanib, and sunitinib, respectively. Responses were also observed with nintedanib and lenvatinib. Among patients who received more than one TKI (n=10), 3 partial responses were achieved after prior treatment with a different TKI.

      Conclusion:
      RET inhibitors are active in individual patients with RET-rearranged NSCLC, however, novel therapeutic approaches are warranted with the hope of improving current clinical outcomes. GLORY remains the largest dataset of patients with RET-rearranged NSCLC, and continues to accrue patients.

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    OA10 - EGFR Mutations (ID 382)

    • Event: WCLC 2016
    • Type: Oral Session
    • Track: Biology/Pathology
    • Presentations: 1
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      OA10.06 - Characteristics and Outcomes of Patients with Lung Cancer Harboring Multiple Molecular Alterations (Biomarker IFCT Study) (ID 5425)

      11:00 - 12:30  |  Author(s): J. Mazieres

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background:
      Carcinogenesis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) can be driven by oncogenic addiction that can be targeted by specific inhibitors. It is commonly accepted that these molecular alterations are mutually exclusive. Nevertheless, limited series suggest that concomitant molecular alteration can occur in lung cancer and little is known about their sensitivity to treatment. Based on a nationwide screening program conducted during one year, we aimed to analyze the largest molecular database to date for concomitant mutations in order to determine the prevalence of multiple genomic alterations in NSCLC and their impact on both prognosis and response to treatment.

      Methods:
      The database of Biomarker France IFCT study collecting the molecular profile of 17 664 NSCLC has been used. The prevalence of multiple alterations and of each association was calculated. Impact on prognosis (overall survival, OS), response to targeted or conventional treatments (progression free survival, PFS and objective response rate, ORR) were established and compared with the population of patients harboring single mutations and full wild-type.

      Results:
      We identified 162 (0.9%) patients with double genetic alterations and 3 with triple alterations. Multiple mutations involved preferentially KRAS (67.3%), PI3K (53.3%) and EGFR (42.4%). Patients with multiple alterations were male (56.4%) with a median age of 66.7 and essentially adenocarcinoma (83.6%). More never-smokers were observed in comparison with patient with singles alterations (34.7 vs. 25.8 %, p<0.001). OS was not significantly different between single and multiple alterations whatever the type of mutations. Patients with EGFR/KRAS and EGFR/PI3K mutated tumors had worse PFS after biomarker analysis than patients with EGFR single mutation (7.1 and 7.1 months vs. 14.9 months, p=0.02 and 0.002, respectively). Concomitant mutations in patients harboring ALK rearrangement had little impact on OS (17.7 months vs. 20.3 months, p=0.57) or PFS (10.3 months vs. 12.1 months, p=0.93). Patients harboring KRAS mutations with another alteration had similar OS (13.4 vs. 11.2 months, p=0.28), PFS (6.4 months vs. 7.2 months, p=0.78) and ORR to first-line chemotherapy (41.7% vs. 37.2%) to those only harboring KRAS mutations.

      Conclusion:
      With almost 1% of patients harboring multiple genomic alterations, the dogma of mutually exclusive mutations should be reconsidered. Double mutations do not significantly decrease OS but alter PFS under first line treatment for EGFR mutated patients. Therapies targeting the dominant oncogene remain generally active in this setting.

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    OA18 - New Insights in the Treatment of Thymic Malignancies (ID 408)

    • Event: WCLC 2016
    • Type: Oral Session
    • Track: Mesothelioma/Thymic Malignancies/Esophageal Cancer/Other Thoracic Malignancies
    • Presentations: 1
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      OA18.07 - Quality of Resection and Outcome in Stage III TETs: The French RYTHMIC Network Experience (ID 6173)

      11:00 - 12:30  |  Author(s): J. Mazieres

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background:
      Stage III TET represents a heterogeneous population and their optimal approach remains unclear; most of the available literature is composed of small series spanned over extended periods of time. RYTHMIC (Réseau tumeurs THYMiques et Cancer) is a French nationwide network for TET with the objective of territorial coverage by regional expert centers and systematic discussion of patients management at national tumor board. We reviewed our experience in stage III thymic tumors in order to evaluate the value of tumor board recommendations and multidisciplinary approach.

      Methods:
      We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients (pts) with stage III TET discussed at the RYTHMIC tumor board from January 2012 to December 2015. Clinical, pathologic and surgical data were prospectively collected in a central database. Survival rates were based on Kaplan-Meier estimation. Cox proportional hazard models were used to evaluate prognostic factors for disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS).

      Results:
      150 pts were included in the analysis. Median age was 64 years [18 – 91], 56% males, thymoma A-B2/ B3-thymic carcinoma in 52% and 47% respectively; 12% presented with autoimmune disorder (76% myasthenia). Local treatment was surgery in 134 pts (90%) followed by radiotherapy (RT) in 90 pts; 26 pts received preoperative chemotherapy (CT). Complete resection rate (R0) was 53%. Among 38 pts considered non-surgical candidates at diagnosis, 26 pts became resectable after induction CT with a R0 rate of 58%; 12 pts received CT-RT and/or CT as primary treatment. Recurrence rate was 38% (n=57), first sites were pleural (n=32) and lung (n=12). The 5-year OS and DFS were 88% and 32% respectively. Gender (HR: 0.2 [95%CI 0.04 - 0.97] p=0.04), histology (HR: 0.19 [95%CI 0.05 - 0.70] p=0.02) and surgery (HR: 0.4 [95%CI 0.01 - 0.20] p<0.001) as primary treatment modality were significant prognostic factors for OS in multivariate analysis. Histology (HR: 0.5 [95%CI 0.30 - 0.90] p=0.02) and adjuvant RT (HR: 0.4 [95%CI 0.20 – 1.00] p=0.05) were significantly associated with DFS. Completeness of resection was not associated with survival in our cohort.

      Conclusion:
      Surgery followed by radiotherapy improves outcome irrespectively of R0. Stage III TET not candidate to surgery should be reassessed for resection after induction chemotherapy.

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    OA22 - Novel Trials and Biomarkers in Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma (ID 403)

    • Event: WCLC 2016
    • Type: Oral Session
    • Track: Mesothelioma/Thymic Malignancies/Esophageal Cancer/Other Thoracic Malignancies
    • Presentations: 1
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      OA22.02 - Nintedanib plus Pemetrexed/Cisplatin in Patients with MPM: Phase II Findings from the Placebo-Controlled LUME-Meso Trial (ID 4191)

      14:20 - 15:50  |  Author(s): J. Mazieres

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background:
      Standard first-line treatment for patients with unresectable malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is pemetrexed/cisplatin, yielding a median overall survival (OS) of only ~1 year, thus new approaches are required. As demonstrated by the bevacizumab MAPS study, inhibition of the VEGF pathway is of interest as a treatment approach for MPM. Nintedanib is an oral, triple angiokinase inhibitor of VEGFR, PDGFR and FGFR. This study will evaluate the efficacy and safety of nintedanib plus pemetrexed/cisplatin in patients with advanced MPM.

      Methods:
      Patients with unresectable MPM (chemo-naïve, ECOG PS 0–1) were stratified by histology (epithelioid/biphasic) and randomised (1:1) to receive up to 6 cycles of pemetrexed (500 mg/m[2])/cisplatin (75 mg/m[2]) on Day 1 plus nintedanib (200 mg bid)/placebo on Days 2–21. Patients without disease progression received maintenance treatment with nintedanib/placebo. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS).

      Results:
      87 patients were randomised to receive pemetrexed/cisplatin, plus nintedanib/placebo. Patient characteristics were comparable between the groups. PFS was longer in the nintedanib vs the placebo arm, in both the overall study population and in epithelioid patients (Table 1). Preliminary OS data also favour nintedanib. All patients experienced at least one adverse event (AE, any grade), with 7% of patients in the nintedanib arm discontinuing due to AEs, vs 15% with placebo. Serious AEs occurred in 36% vs 42% of patients in the nintedanib and placebo arms, respectively. The most common ≥grade 3 AEs occurring in nintedanib vs placebo patients were neutropenia (34% vs 10%), ALT increase (14% vs 2%) and gamma glutamyltransferase increase (14% vs 0%).

      Conclusion:
      Nintedanib plus pemetrexed/cisplatin demonstrated clinical efficacy with improved PFS and a tolerable safety profile in patients with unresectable MPM. Based on these promising findings, this Phase II study was extended to a confirmatory Phase III trial, which is currently enrolling patients. Clinical trial identifier: NCT01907100.

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    P1.06 - Poster Session with Presenters Present (ID 458)

    • Event: WCLC 2016
    • Type: Poster Presenters Present
    • Track: Advanced NSCLC
    • Presentations: 1
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      P1.06-005 - An International Cohort of Patients with Small Cell Lung Cancer after a Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma Oncogene or Non-Oncogene Addicted (ID 4531)

      14:30 - 15:45  |  Author(s): J. Mazieres

      • Abstract
      • Slides

      Background:
      Phenotypic transformation from Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a resistance mechanism in tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) treated EGFR mutant tumors. SCLC is also however less frequently diagnosed in patients without EGFR mutations treated with chemotherapy. These transformations are rare and little is known about the clinical and therapeutic characteristics of these patients. In this study we describe and compare the characteristics of SCLC arising from mutant or non mutant NSCLC.

      Methods:
      We performed a multicentric retrospective collection (27 centers in France and Italy) of cases. Between 2005 and 2015, patients with stage III or IV NSCLC with a secondary transformation to SCLC with histological proof were included.

      Results:
      Forty seven cases of SCLC transformation were collected, 34 in EGFR mutant and 13 in non. Most of the patients (n=37, 82%) were stage IV, (n=27, 57%) female and (n=26, 76%) had an exon 19 mutation. The last treatment before transformation was a TKI in 23 (68%) cases in the mutant group and in 3 (23%) patients (erlotinib) in the non-mutant. Median time to SCLC transformation was 17 [IQR, 11-29] months in the mutant group and 26 [IQR 23-36] months in the other (p=0.03). Molecular analyses were not performed in the non mutant group, 25 (74%) had molecular analyses in the EGFR mutant. A driver mutation was identified in 22/25 (88%) patients: in most of the cases the same as the initial, 1 case of ALK fusion and 1 of PI3K mutation. Thirty patients (88%) received at least one line of treatment after transformation in the mutant group, in all cases a platinum-etoposide (P-E) chemotherapy. Median survival from initial diagnosis in the EGFR mutant group was significantly worse 28 [17-41] months vs 49 [36-118] months in the non EGFR mutant group (p=0.01). After transformation, the same tendency was observed with a median survival of 8 [3-12] months for the EGFR mutated patients vs 13 [6-15] months for the non EGFR mutated patients (p=0.06).

      Conclusion:
      SCLC that occurs in EGFR mutant treated by TKIs is more aggressive than classic SCLC, and differs on epidemiological characteristics. These transformed SCLC are not fully explained and we need to define the molecular characteristics of this cohort, before and after transformation and if funded the whole genome sequencing of the tumors to understand this TKIs mechanism of resistant.

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    P1.07 - Poster Session with Presenters Present (ID 459)

    • Event: WCLC 2016
    • Type: Poster Presenters Present
    • Track: SCLC/Neuroendocrine Tumors
    • Presentations: 1
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      P1.07-012 - Efficacy of Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors in Large Cell Neuroendocrine Lung Cancer: Results from a French Retrospective Cohort (ID 4613)

      14:30 - 15:45  |  Author(s): J. Mazieres

      • Abstract
      • Slides

      Background:
      Nivolumab and pembrolizumab, two programmed death (PD)-1 immune-checkpoint–inhibitor antibodies, demonstrated superiority versus standard chemotherapy in second- third line in both squamous and non-squamous lung cancer. Large cell neuroendocrine lung cancer (LCNEC) is a rare tumour often treated as a small cell lung cancer, but there is not a standard of care after a first line progression. Aim of the study was to assess clinical efficacy of PD-1 inhibitors in these patients.

      Methods:
      We retrospectively reviewed all consecutive LCNEC stage IIIB- IV patients treated with nivolumab or pembrolizumab after platinum-based first line therapy between July 2014 and November 2015 in six French centres. Patients were followed until June 2016. The drugs were given in an early access program or a clinical trial.

      Results:
      The analysis included 10 patients with advanced stage disease. Eight patients (80%) had a stage IV disease with a median age of 59 [interquartile range (IQR) 55-62] years. The majority were males (n=9; 90%), with good performance status (0-1; 9/90%) and 50% were treated in third line or further. Three patients presented brain metastases. In 5 cases a molecular test was done, finding in one case (20%) a KRAS mutation. Patients received a first line treatment with platinum and etoposide in 8 cases (80%) with a disease control rate of 50%. Nine patients received nivolumab and the PD-L1 status was never performed, while the patient treated with pembrolizumab expressed PD-L1. Patients received a median number of 16 [IQR, 13-18] cycles, 6 showed a partial response (60%), 1 a stable disease (10%). Median PFS was 57 [24-57] weeks. Most of the patients stopped treatment due to disease progression (n=4; 80%), only one for a pulmonary interstitial pneumonia.

      Conclusion:
      Our findings suggest that the use of immune-checkpoint–inhibitors in LCNEC could be explored in a larger cohort of patients. This treatment could be considered in the scenario of a disease with limited therapeutic strategy.

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    P2.03b - Poster Session with Presenters Present (ID 465)

    • Event: WCLC 2016
    • Type: Poster Presenters Present
    • Track: Advanced NSCLC
    • Presentations: 1
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      P2.03b-037 - Prognostic Impact of 1st-Line Treatment and Molecular Testing in Advanced NSCLC in France - Results of the IFCT-PREDICT.amm Study (ID 5628)

      14:30 - 15:45  |  Author(s): J. Mazieres

      • Abstract

      Background:
      In 2013, recommendations for 1st line treatment in advanced NSCLC included a platinum based chemotherapy (pCT) with or without bevacizumab (BEV-pCT), an EGFR-TKI, or a non-platinum based CT (non-pCT) depending on clinical, pathological and molecular characteristics. Molecular testing for KRAS, EGFR and ALK, is routinely performed in France for advanced non-squamous NSCLC. However, the prognostic impact of the molecular status knowledge before beginning 1st line treatment is unknown.

      Methods:
      After a cross-validation study, KRAS, EGFR and ALK molecular status were assessed in 843 consecutive patients (pts) with previously untreated advanced NSCLC (all histologic subtypes) and categorized as: EGFR/ALK+, KRAS+, wild-type (WT), undetermined (UD) and not done (ND). Treatments from the 1st to 3rd line were separated into 4 groups: p-CT, BEVA-pCT, EGFR/ALK TKI and non-pCT. Demographic, clinical and pathological characteristics were collected and pts were followed-up until death. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) for each line were determined. Prognostic factors including treatment categories (p-CT as reference) and biomarkers status (WT as reference) were studied by Cox model.

      Results:
      Treatments were analyzed in 767 (91.0%) of the 843 pts enrolled between 01/2013 and 02/2014. Pts were 93.1% Caucasians, 66.2% males. Median age was 62.4 yr (28-92). 13.4% were never smokers. PS ≥2 were 21.4% and 90.3% were stage IV. 76.5% had adenocarcinoma, 14.5% squamous cell carcinoma and 9% others with WT=40.4%, KRAS+=23.1%, EGFR/ALK+=10.2%, UD=5.1%, ND=21.2%. 1st line treatments were: p-CT=75.9%, BEVA-pCT=14.2%, EGFR/ALK TKI=7.8% and non-pCT=2.1%. With a 30.3 months (mo) median of follow-up, median OS and PFS were 10.7 mo and 5.3 mo, respectively. Factors independently associated with shorter OS were PS≥2 (HR=2.08, p<.0001), KRAS+, UD and ND mutation status (HR=1.40, p=.002; 1.53, p=.02; 1.29, p=.02), and non-pCT as 1st line treatment (HR=1.92, p=.01), while EGFR/ALK+ (HR=.38, p<.0001) and BEVA-pCT (HR=.54, p<.001) were associated with better survival. There was no interaction effect between biomarkers status and OS treatment groups. However, BEVA-pCT in 1st line therapy in KRAS+ and WT NSCLC (p<.0001 and <.0003, respectively) was associated with longer survival compared to p-CT, while giving a TKI or p-CT in 1st line therapy in EGFR/ALK+ NSCLC did not affect OS.

      Conclusion:
      Results from the IFCT-PREDICT.amm study suggest that prognosis of advanced NSCLC might be optimized in 1st line setting by the knowledge of EGFR/ALK molecular status and the opportunity to give a BEVA-pCT regimen, especially in patients with KRAS+ and WT tumor.

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    P2.04 - Poster Session with Presenters Present (ID 466)

    • Event: WCLC 2016
    • Type: Poster Presenters Present
    • Track: Mesothelioma/Thymic Malignancies/Esophageal Cancer/Other Thoracic Malignancies
    • Presentations: 2
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      P2.04-003 - Chemotherapy in Advanced Thymic Epithelial Tumors: Insights from the RYTHMIC Prospective Cohort (ID 4275)

      14:30 - 15:45  |  Author(s): J. Mazieres

      • Abstract
      • Slides

      Background:
      Thymic Epithelial Tumors (TET) are rare intrathoracic malignancies, which may be aggressive and difficult to treat. In the advanced setting, chemotherapy may be delivered as a primary/induction therapy before subsequent surgery or definitive radiotherapy, and/or as exclusive treatment in patients for whom no focal treatment is feasible, and/or in the setting of recurrences. As no randomized trial and a limited number of prospective studies are available, there is paucity of prospective, multicentre evidence regarding response rates and survival of patients. RYTHMIC is the nationwide network for TET in France. The RYTHMIC prospective database is hosted by the French Intergroup (IFCT), and collects data for all patients diagnosed with TET, for whom management is discussed at a national multidisciplinary tumor board (MTB) based on consensual recommendations. Primary, exclusive chemotherapy, and chemotherapy for recurrence accounted for 149 (11%), 37 (3%), and 67 (5%) questions of a total of 1401 questions raised at the MTB between 2012 and 2015.

      Methods:
      All consecutive patients for whom chemotherapy and/or systemic treatment was discussed at the RYTHMIC MTB from 2012 to 2015 were identified from the RYTHMIC prospective database. Main endpoints were response rates and progression-free and overall survival.

      Results:
      At the time of analysis, data were available for 156 patients (80 thymic carcinomas, and 76 thymomas), for whom the management led to raise 283 questions at the MTB: 67 (24%) for primary chemotherapy, 35 (11%) for exclusive chemotherapy, and 181 (64%) for recurrences. For primary and exclusive chemotherapy, the most frequently administered regimen was CAP, producing response rates of 70% and 60%, respectively. A total of 104 patients received at least one line of chemotherapy for recurrence; 53 patients received second-line treatment, and 13 and 7 patients received third- and fourth line treatment. In the setting of first recurrence, carboplatine-paclitaxel combination was the most preferred regimen, administered to 54% of patients; overall response and disease control rates to systemic treatments for recurrences were 13% and 42% in thymic carcinomas, and 19% and 43% in thymomas (p=0.38 and p=0.92, respectively). Median recurrence-free survival after primary chemotherapy was 16.6 months; median progression-free survival after exclusive chemotherapy, and first-, second-, and third-line chemotherapy for recurrence were 6.0 months, and 7.6 months, 6.2 months, and 6.0 months.

      Conclusion:
      Our data provide with a unique insight in the efficacy of chemotherapy for advanced thymic epithelial tumors in a real-life setting; our results help the decision-making to better define the optimal therapeutic strategies.

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      P2.04-006 - Updated Incidence of Thymic Epithelial Tumors (TET) in France and Clinical Presentation at Diagnosis (ID 5952)

      14:30 - 15:45  |  Author(s): J. Mazieres

      • Abstract
      • Slides

      Background:
      TETs are rare malignancies with an overall described incidence of 0.13 per 100.000 person-years. Given this, most of our knowledge is largely derived from small single-institution series. RYTHMIC (Réseau tumeurs THYMiques et Cancer) is a French network for TET with the objective of territorial coverage by 14 regional expert centers, systematic discussion of patients at national tumor board and collection of nationwide data within a centralized database. We reviewed our activity in 2015 in order to describe the epidemiology and main characteristics at diagnosis of thymic malignancies in France.

      Methods:
      Through RYTHMIC, we prospectively collected all patients (pts) with new diagnosis of primary TET in France in 2015. Epidemiologic, clinical, pathologic and surgical data were prospectively collected within a centralized database. Histologic subtype was centrally reviewed according to the WHO classification and stage by modified Masaoka-Koga classification.

      Results:
      A total of 234 cases with new diagnosis of primary thymoma (T) or thymic carcinoma (TC) have been discussed at RYTHMIC between Jan to Dec 2015. Among them, 58% were males; median age was 62 years [range 27; 86] for males and 61 years for females [range 24; 84]; 20% of the pts presented an autoimmune disorder (AI); myasthenia gravis was the most common in 76% of them. History of previous malignancies was described in 15% of the pts, being melanoma, prostate and breast cancer the most frequently observed. Any potentially relevant environmental exposure was declared for most of the pts. Histology was characterized as follows: A / AB / B1 / B2 / B3 / TC / neuroendocrine tumors and rare variants in 7% / 23% / 13% / 24% / 9% / 16% / 8% respectively. Stage I-II / III-IV tumors were observed in 63% / 37% respectively. Mediastinal pleura, mediastinal nodes and lung were the most common metastatic sites. Significant correlations were found between histologic sub-type (T vs TC) and presence of AI (p=0.01) and stage (I-II vs III-IV, p=0.004); no significant correlations were seen with gender (p=0.27).

      Conclusion:
      The estimated incidence of TETS in France in 2015 is 0.35 per 100.000 persons, based in our activity. The inclusion in the RYTHMIC network is mandatory but is still based on physician’s request. Although we might underestimate the incidence, it seems to be higher compared to other countries’ registries. The high occurrence of previous cancer might underlie variations in environmental or genetic risk factors.

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    P2.06 - Poster Session with Presenters Present (ID 467)

    • Event: WCLC 2016
    • Type: Poster Presenters Present
    • Track: Scientific Co-Operation/Research Groups (Clinical Trials in Progress should be submitted in this category)
    • Presentations: 1
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      P2.06-012 - Phase 2 Study of Abemaciclib + Pembrolizumab in KRAS Mutation, PD-L1+, Stage IV Non-Small Cell or Squamous Cell Lung Cancer (ID 3762)

      14:30 - 15:45  |  Author(s): J. Mazieres

      • Abstract
      • Slides

      Background:
      Stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring KRAS mutations remains a treatment challenge. Abemaciclib, a small molecular inhibitor of both cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4 and CDK6, demonstrated acceptable safety, tolerability, and single-agent activity for patients with different tumors, including NSCLC. Preclinical evidence suggests a lethal interaction between CDK4 inhibition in lung cells and KRAS oncogenes. Pembrolizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against PD-1 protein, is approved in the US for patients with metastatic PD-L1+ NSCLC. Both compounds demonstrated manageable toxicities. We thus aim to study the combination of abemaciclib and pembrolizumab in pretreated patients with NSCLC.

      Methods:
      This open-label phase 2 study will evaluate safety and preliminary efficacy of abemaciclib 150 mg given orally every 12 hours on a continuous schedule on days 1-21 in combination with intravenous pembrolizumab 200 mg on day 1 of a 21-day cycle to patients in 1 of 3 disease cohorts: KRAS mutation, PD-L1+, stage IV NSCLC (Part A); stage IV NSCLC with squamous histology (Part B); or hormone receptor+, HER2- metastatic breast cancer (Part C). Total target accrual is approximately 75 patients (25 per cohort). Only the 2 NSCLC cohorts will be presented here. Patients eligible for Part A have a confirmed KRAS mutation, PD-L1+ expression score of ≥1%, and are chemotherapy-naïve for metastatic NSCLC. Part B includes patients with predominately squamous NSCLC who have received 1 prior platinum-based chemotherapy for advanced NSCLC. Patients must provide tumor tissue before and after treatment (cycle 3, day 1); have measurable disease, adequate organ function, an ECOG PS ≤1, and a life expectancy ≥12 weeks; and be ≥18 years of age and able to swallow oral medications. The primary objective is to characterize the safety profile of abemaciclib plus pembrolizumab. Secondary objectives include objective response rate (ORR), disease control rate (DCR), duration of response (DoR), progression-free survival (PFS), characterization of pharmacokinetics, and health outcomes. Patients who receive any study drug will be included in the analyses. Analyses of ORR, DCR, DoR, and PFS will be evaluated according to RECIST v.1.1 and irRECIST. Time-to-event variables will be estimated by Kaplan-Meier methodology. An interim analysis of safety and preliminary efficacy may occur after all patients have completed (or discontinued from) approximately 24 weeks of treatment. The final OS analysis will occur based on data collected for approximately 12 months after the last patient receives treatment.

      Results:
      Section not applicable

      Conclusion:
      Section not applicable

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    P3.02a - Poster Session with Presenters Present (ID 470)

    • Event: WCLC 2016
    • Type: Poster Presenters Present
    • Track: Advanced NSCLC
    • Presentations: 1
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      P3.02a-034 - Vemurafenib in Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) Harboring BRAF Mutation. Preliminary Results of the AcSé Trial (ID 4924)

      14:30 - 15:45  |  Author(s): J. Mazieres

      • Abstract
      • Slides

      Background:
      BRAF is found mutated in 2-3% of stage IV NSCLC. BRAF inhibitors have been reported to have antitumor activity. A nationwide access to vemurafenib for cancer patients with tumors presenting with BRAF mutations was launched by the French National Cancer Institute (INCa) providing free access to tumor molecular diagnosis. The AcSé-Vemurafenib study is the 2[nd] exploratory multi-tumor 2-stage design phase II trial of AcSé program. We report the preliminary results of the NSCLC cohort in this nationwide program.

      Methods:
      BRAF mutational status was assessed on INCa molecular genetic platforms by either direct sequencing or NGS. Patients with BRAF mutation (including BRAF V600E and others less common mutations), progressing after at least one standard treatment (including a platinum-based doublet, unless pts were considered as unfit for chemotherapy) were proposed to receive vemurafenib 960 mg BID. Responses were centrally assessed using RECIST v1.1 every 8 weeks.

      Results:
      From Oct. 13, 2014 to June 15, 2016, 65 patients were enrolled including 55 NSCLC harboring BRAF V600E and 10 pts with other activating mutations (2 G466, 3 G469, 1 G596, 3 K601 and 1 N581). 55 patients received vemurafenib and had at least one post-baseline assessment. Median age: 67 years (range 40–84), 51% females and 100% non-squamous histology. Median number of prior chemotherapy lines: 1 (0 –5). Most frequent grade ≥3 adverse events (AEs) were skin (18% of patients) and gastrointestinal toxicities (16%). Among the 39 BRAF V600E NSCLC patients evaluable for the best overall response (BOR) with a minimum follow-up of 4 months, 15 PR, 8 SD, 10 PD, 5 deaths before assessment and 1 missing were observed. The objective response rate was 38.5% [95% CI:23.4-55.4], and the disease control rate 59% [42.1-74.4]. Median duration of response was 5.1 months [1.8-9.2]. Progression-free survival (PFS) at 4 months was 48.2% [31.8-62.8]. No response was reported among the 7 evaluable patients with other BRAF mutations with 5 PD, 1 death before assessment and 1 missing as BOR ; PFS at 4 months was 14.3% [0.7-46.5]. 18 patients were still on treatment at the cut-off date, 47 have stopped vemurafenib (25 PD, 15 AEs, 1 death, 1 doctor’s decision, 5 patient’s decisions).

      Conclusion:
      Vemurafenib provided response rate and DCR in BRAF V600E pretreated NSCLC but was not found efficient in NSCLC with other BRAF mutations. These results underline the interest of integrating BRAF V600E in biomarkers routine screening.

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    P3.02c - Poster Session with Presenters Present (ID 472)

    • Event: WCLC 2016
    • Type: Poster Presenters Present
    • Track: Advanced NSCLC
    • Presentations: 1
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      P3.02c-032 - Interstitial Pneumonitis Associated with Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors Treatment in Cancer Patients (ID 5670)

      14:30 - 15:45  |  Author(s): J. Mazieres

      • Abstract
      • Slides

      Background:
      Immunotherapy is now a standard of care in melanoma, lung cancer and is spreading across other tumours. Immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICI) are generally well tolerated but can also generate immune-related adverse effects. Since the first trials, pneumonitis has been identified as a rare but potentially life-threatening event.

      Methods:
      We conducted a retrospective study over a period of 5 months in centers experienced in ICI use in clinical trials, access programs or following national approval. We report the main features of possibly related pneumonitis occurring in patients treated with ICI with a particular focus on clinical presentation, radiologic patterns (with a double reviewing by radiologists and pulmonologists), pathology and therapeutic strategies.

      Results:
      We identified 71 patients with possibly related pneumonitis including 54 NSCLC and 13 melanoma. They mainly received PD1 inhibitors. Pneumonitis usually occurred in male, former or current smokers with a median age of 59 years. We observed grade 2/3 (n= 45, 65.2%) and grade 5 (n= 6, 8.7%) pneumonitis. The median duration time between the introduction of immunotherapy and the pneumonitis was 2.2 months [0.1-27.4]. Ground glass opacitiy on lung CT-scan were the most predominant lesion 80.9% (n=55), followed by consolidations 44.1% (n=30), reticulations 36.7% (n=25) and bronchiectasis in 20.6% (n=14). When performed, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) showed a T-lymphocytic alveolitis and transbronchial biopsy an inflammatory and lymphocytic infiltration. Pneumonitis treatment was steroids (86.6%) and/or antibiotics (67.6%). Immunotherapy was stopped after the pneumonitis for 65 cases (92.9%) and reintroduced for 12 (9.4%) cases. Twenty-four patients (34.3%) were dead at the last follow-up and 46 patients (65.7%) were still alive. Among the living patients, the pneumonitis outcome was a total recovery in 12 patients, improvement in 22 patients, stability in 10 patients, worsening evolution in 1 patient (1 unknown). Causality of immunotherapy was evaluated by investigators as “possible” for 34 patients (49.3%), “probable” for 17 (24.6%), “certain” for 15 (21.7%) other causes for 3 (4.3%) and 2 unknowns. Median overall survival from the onset of pneumonitis was 6 months.

      Conclusion:
      This serie, the largest to date, of immune-related pneumonitis demonstrates that it occurs usually during the first months and displays specific radiologic features. As there is no clearly identified risk factor, oncologists should be able to detect, diagnose (with CT-scan and bronchoscopy) and treat this adverse event. An early management is usually associated with a favourable outcome and requires a close collaboration between pulmonologists, radiologists and oncologists.

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