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K. Wilner



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    MO07 - NSCLC - Targeted Therapies II (ID 114)

    • Event: WCLC 2013
    • Type: Mini Oral Abstract Session
    • Track: Medical Oncology
    • Presentations: 1
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      MO07.03 - Crizotinib therapy for patients with advanced ROS1-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (ID 2777)

      16:15 - 17:45  |  Author(s): K. Wilner

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background
      Rearrangements of the ROS1 receptor tyrosine kinase gene identify a subset of NSCLC sensitive to the small-molecule ALK and MET inhibitor crizotinib, approved multinationally for the treatment of advanced ALK-positive NSCLC. Here we present updated efficacy and safety data for crizotinib in an expanded cohort of patients with advanced ROS1-rearranged NSCLC.

      Methods
      ROS1 status was determined by break-apart FISH assays, and patients were enrolled into an expansion cohort of an ongoing phase I crizotinib study (PROFILE 1001; NCT00585195, Pfizer). Where available, samples were also tested for concurrent ALK rearrangement and MET amplification. Patients received crizotinib 250 mg BID, and responses were assessed using RECIST v1.0.

      Results
      At the data cut-off, 35 of 40 patients with ROS1-positive NSCLC were evaluable for response. Median age was 51 years (range 31–77), 80% of patients were never-smokers, and 98% had adenocarcinoma histology; 40% had received one prior regimen, and 45% had received 2–6 regimens for advanced/metastatic disease. 25 samples tested for concurrent ALK rearrangement (24 by FISH and 1 by PCR) and 12 samples tested for concurrent MET amplification (11 by FISH and 1 method not recorded) were all negative. The objective response rate (ORR) was 60% (95% CI: 42–76), with 2 complete responses, 19 partial responses, and 10 cases of stable disease. Median progression-free survival (PFS) had not been reached, with 25 patients (63%) still in follow-up for PFS; six patients (15%) experienced disease progression, and two (5%) died before progression occurred; 6-month PFS probability was 76% (95% CI: 55–88). The disease-control rate was 80% at 8 weeks and 66% at 16 weeks. The most common treatment-related adverse events (AEs) were visual impairment (80%), diarrhea (35%), and nausea (30%), with most patients (68%) reporting only AEs of grade 1 or 2 severity. Peripheral edema (28%) and elevated transaminases (18% AST, 15% ALT) were also reported, similar to previous experience with crizotinib. There were no treatment-related serious AEs and one patient discontinued treatment due to treatment-related nausea. Accrual of patients with ROS1-positive NSCLC is ongoing.

      Conclusion
      Similar to results obtained in ALK-positive NSCLC, crizotinib had marked antitumor activity with a high ORR (60%) in patients with ROS1-positive NSCLC, with a generally tolerable and manageable AE profile. These data suggest that crizotinib is an effective therapy for patients with advanced ROS1-positive NSCLC.

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