Virtual Library

Start Your Search

R. Büttner



Author of

  • +

    MO10 - Molecular Pathology II (ID 127)

    • Event: WCLC 2013
    • Type: Mini Oral Abstract Session
    • Track: Pathology
    • Presentations: 1
    • +

      MO10.04 - High throughput parallel amplicon sequencing of common driver mutations from FFPE lung cancer samples in molecular pathological routine diagnostics for a regional health care provider network (ID 2145)

      16:15 - 17:45  |  Author(s): R. Büttner

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background
      Treatment paradigms for non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have shifted from one based only on histology to one that incorporates molecular subtypes involving particular genetic alterations such as activating mutations in EGFR or translocations of ALK. The list of therapeutically targetable lesions is rapidly increasing including mutations in genes such as EGFR, HER2, KRAS, ALK, BRAF, PIK3CA, AKT1, ROS1, NRAS, FGFR1 and MAP2K1. Analysis of these potential targets is becoming a challenge in terms of work load, tissue availability as well as cost. Within the Network Genomic Medicine Lung Cancer (NGM), a regional molecular screening network of the Center for Integrated Oncology Köln Bonn, we aimed to improve on the sequential analysis of a set of 9 target amplicons by Sanger sequencing using bench top ultra-deep parallel sequencing platforms. We aimed to reduce 1) the time requirement for comprehensive molecular diagnostics, 2) the minimal amount of formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) derived input DNA, 3) while at the same time increasing the number of target regions analysed.

      Methods
      We established a multiplex PCR to amplify up to 640 lung cancer relevant target regions from at least 20ng of FFPE derived tumor DNA. The amplicon libraries were ligated to adapters encompassing medical identifier sequences that allowed multiplexing of up to 48 patients. The resulting libraries were sequenced on a benchtop Illumina platform (MiSeq). Mutations identified by parallel sequencing were confirmed by Sanger sequencing.

      Results
      330 patients were analyzed both by traditional single PCR based Sanger sequencing of 9 amplicons and the newly established parallel sequencing protocol. We found that the NGS approach worked reliably, was less prone to sequencing analysis errors and that the time needed to complete the mutation screening was significantly reduced to 7 working days from previously 21 days. A total of at least 300ng of DNA was needed to complete the analysis of 9 amplicons by Sanger sequencing compared to 20 to 100ng of DNA needed for up to 640 amplicons analyzed by parallel sequencing.

      Conclusion
      Newly multiplex PCR based parallel sequencing allows rapid comprehensive mutation testing in routine molecular pathological diagnostics even on small FFPE embedded transbronchial biopsies.

      Only Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login, select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout. If you would like to become a member of IASLC, please click here.

      Only Active Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login or select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout.

  • +

    P1.06 - Poster Session 1 - Prognostic and Predictive Biomarkers (ID 161)

    • Event: WCLC 2013
    • Type: Poster Session
    • Track: Biology
    • Presentations: 1
    • +

      P1.06-023 - Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK)-detection in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer: results of the first European IHC-based (D5F3-Optiview) panel test within 16 institutes (ID 1825)

      09:30 - 16:30  |  Author(s): R. Büttner

      • Abstract

      Background
      The study was supported by Ventana Medical Systems, Inc., a Member of the Roche Group Background: The reliable identification of NSCLC patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangement is crucial for the prescription of ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (e.g. crizotinib). Whereas the US FDA-approval (2011) is based upon FISH-testing, the European EMA-approval (2012) refers to the definition of “ALK-positive” NSCLCs without mandating a particular test. Therefore a reliable ALK-immunohistochemistry (IHC) could be a promising option in daily routine practice.

      Methods
      Material and methods: To test the reliability of ALK-IHC-diagnosis in a multi-centre environment (17 European institutes from Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Scotland, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland) two tissue microarrays (TMA) consisting of 15 NSCLC cases (all adenocarcinomas; 3 cores for each case) were independently tested for ALK-expression by each laboratory using Ventana Medical System’s ALK (D5F3) primary antibody combined with OptiView DAB IHC detection and OptiView Amplification kits. Cases included in the study were unequivocal ALK-break positive or negative (by FISH), as well as so called “ALK-borderline” cases (low percentage of ALK-break positive cells by FISH, around the cut-off of 15%, therefore challenging in diagnosis, but PCR-confirmed as harbouring EML-4-ALK-fusion variants and thus eligible for therapy). Prior to the TMA-based case testing, each participating instrument was qualified using the VENTANA ALK 2 in 1 Control Slides. To provide a uniform baseline interpretation, a webinar-based training was given to all observers. This training included an overview of the ALK Interpretation Guide, a guided review of 50 patient cases using digital whole slide images, and a proficiency exam certifying each observer.

      Results
      Results: Detailed data analysis was only partly accomplished at the time of abstract submission and will be presented in detail at the “World Conference on LUNG Cancer” in Sydney. Besides the binary evaluation of the cases (ALK-negative vs. ALK-positive) observers were asked to estimate the staining intensity (0-3) within positive cases in correlation to the number of tumor cells and to generate the H-score.

      Conclusion
      Conclusion: Referring to the EMA-approval text our multi-centre study may contribute to validation and accuracy of IHC-based ALK-testing. Such a validated and reliable IHC-assay could be used: (a) as a good pre-screening method reducing time consuming and costly FISH analysis (shorten turn-around time for test results) and (b) as a final predictive approach in cases with reduced interpretability of FISH results (e.g. minimal tumor cell content in small biopsies, decalcified or artificial altered tissue, FISH in doubt/”borderline”).

  • +

    P1.11 - Poster Session 1 - NSCLC Novel Therapies (ID 208)

    • Event: WCLC 2013
    • Type: Poster Session
    • Track: Medical Oncology
    • Presentations: 2
    • +

      P1.11-041 - Overall survival of ALK translocation - and of EGFR mutation positive NSCLC patients treated with and without personalized therapy. A retrospective analysis within the Network Genomic Medicine (ID 2916)

      09:30 - 16:30  |  Author(s): R. Büttner

      • Abstract

      Background
      Erlotinib, Gefitinib and Crizotinib have been approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for the treatment of molecular defined patient subgroups with advanced EGFR mutation positive (EGFR M+) and ALK translocation positive (ALK +) NSCLC, respectively. In randomized clinical trials for ALK + and EGFR M+ patients comparing standard chemotherapy to TKI treatment so far no significant improvement in overall survival (OS) could be shown, based on the high crossover rate of patients initially treated in the standard chemotherapy arm into the TKI arms upon progression. Since prevention of crossover is obsolete due to ethical reasons, registry data may gain in importance for investigating the impact of new effective targeted drugs on OS in the near future.

      Methods
      Since January 2010 EGFR sequencing and ALK FISH analysis for lung adenocarcinoma was performed within the Network Genomic Medicine (NGM) as part of a broad genetic screening effort. This included mutation screening for EGFR, KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA as well as HER2 amplification and recently also translocations of RET and ROS. Clinical and follow-up data were extracted from medical records, directly collected from physicians and patients and additionally matched with data of the Epidemiological Cancer registry of North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany.

      Results
      So far, we included a total of 44 ALK+ and 143 EGFR M+ patients into our analysis. The median age of the ALK + and EGFR M+patients was 53.5 yrs and 71 yrs, respectively. 39% of the ALK+ patients received crizotinib and 54% of the EGFR M+ patients received an EGFR TKI during the course of their disease. The median OS (mOS) of patients with an initial stage IIIb/IV was 14 months (95% CI 6.2 - 21.8) for ALK+ and 29 months (95% CI 16 - 41) for EGFR M+ patients. Both groups showed a significant difference in mOS when separated by targeted treatment status. ALK+ patients who received crizotinib had a mOS of 23 months (95% CI 12.2 - 33.8) and patients who did not receive crizotinib had a mOS of 8 months (95% CI 0.0 - 17.4) (p = 0.01). EGFR M+ patients who received an EGFR TKI had a mOS of 31 months (95% CI not computable) and patients who did not receive an EGFR TKI had a mOS of 9 months (95% CI 4.9 - 13.1) (p < 0.001). There were no significant differences with regard to treatment of a platinum-containing chemotherapy, age or sex between the two groups.

      Conclusion
      Screening patients for genetic driver mutations identified patients with EGFR mutations and ALK translocations that were not treated with a kinase inhibitor. Comparing these cohorts of patients that only received standard chemotherapy to those subsequently treated with a personalized approach showed a significant improvement in OS. This confirms the predictive value of ALK translocations and EGFR mutations for treatment with the respective TKIs

    • +

      P1.11-042 - SORAVE: Sorafenib and everolimus for patients with solid tumors and with KRAS mutated NSCLC - results of a phase I study. (ID 3068)

      09:30 - 16:30  |  Author(s): R. Büttner

      • Abstract

      Background
      Inhibition of signaling pathways interfering with cell proliferation and angiogenesis may increase anti-tumor efficacy. Sorafenib as well as mTOR inhibitors showed preliminary activity in KRAS mutated NSCLC.

      Methods
      In the dose escalation part, patients with relapsed solid tumors were treated with escalating doses of everolimus from 2.5-10.0 mg daily p.o. in a 14 days run-in phase followed by the combination with a fixed dose of sorafenib 400 mg bid p.o. The extension phase is currently recruiting patients with KRAS mutated NSCLC. The KRAS mutation status is determined by PCR based high resolution melting curve analysis (HRM) on DNA extracted from FFPE material and validated using Sanger sequencing. HRM has now been replaced by multiplex PCR. Pharmacokinetic (PK) analyses are performed during run-in and during the combination. Treatment outcome is validated with CT scans on day 57.

      Results
      In the dose escalation part, 19 patients were recruited. The dose limiting toxicity (DLT) was not reached. At everolimus dose level of 10 mg/day, increased rates of grade 3 thrombocytopenia (3 patients), leukocytopenia (2 patients) and anaemia (2 patients) occurred after the DLT interval of 29 days. Based on these observations, the dose level of 7.5 mg/day everolimus in combination with 400 mg sorafenib bid was defined as a maximal tolerated dose. The AUC and Cmax values of everolimus at all dose levels were comparable on days 5 and 14. On day 29, AUC and Cmax of everolimus showed a 20 - 40% reduction when co-administered with sorafenib. The best treatment outcome on day 57 was stable disease in 11 patients. Median PFS and OS were 3.7 and 5.5 months, respectively. The extension phase in KRAS mutated NSCLC is currently ongoing. Nine patients have been recruited so far. The CT response at day 57 compared to the baseline of four evaluable patients is ranging from -22% to +5% in the sum of the longest diameter of all targeted lesions.

      Conclusion
      Treatment of patients with relapsed solid tumors with the combination of 7.5 mg everolimus p.o. daily and 400 mg sorafenib p.o. bid is safe and feasible. Current results of an extension phase in KRAS mutated NSCLC patients show preliminary clinical activity in this patient group with an unfavorable prognosis.

  • +

    P2.11 - Poster Session 2 - NSCLC Novel Therapies (ID 209)

    • Event: WCLC 2013
    • Type: Poster Session
    • Track: Medical Oncology
    • Presentations: 1
    • +

      P2.11-045 - TRY: A phase II study to evaluate safety and efficacy of combined trastuzumab and AUY922 in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with HER2 overexpression or amplification or mutation. (ID 3057)

      09:30 - 16:30  |  Author(s): R. Büttner

      • Abstract

      Background
      HER2 amplifications and/or mutations are rare genetic alterations in NSCLC accounting for approximately 4%. Preliminary clinical data suggested efficacy of trastuzumab in patients with HER2 IHC3+ status or FISH positivity. The heat shock protein HSP90 is a molecular chaperone that modulates stability and/or transport of intracellular client proteins including HER2. In breast cancer HSP90 inhibition has shown anticancer activity in HER2-positive patients after trastuzumab failure. Here we are investigating the efficacy of the combination of trastuzumab and the HSP90 inhibitor AUY922 in lung cancer patients with aberrant HER2.

      Methods
      This phase II study recruits metastatic NSCLC patients with HER2 overexpression (immunohistochemistry, DAKO-score 3+) or amplification (fluorescence in situ hybridization) or activating mutation after at least one previous standard treatment. In the first part of the study, patients are treated with trastuzumab only. CT scans are scheduled every 6 weeks during treatment. In case of disease progression, patients receive the combination of trastuzumab and AUY922.

      Results
      The study was initiated this year and NSCLC patients are screened within the Network of Genomic Medicine Lung Cancer on HER2 overexpression, amplifications and mutations. Until now, we tested 720 tumor samples by FISH and 63 by genomic sequencing. We identified 55 patients with HER2 amplification, 34 with HER2 overexpression (Dako score 3+) and 7 patients showed a mutation in the HER2 gene (1 exon 19; 6 exon 20).

      Conclusion
      HER2 overexpression, amplification or mutation is a rare genetic alteration in NSCLC patients. Data on treatment with HER2 antibody trastuzumab and HSP90 inhibitor AUY922 will be presented.

  • +

    P3.11 - Poster Session 3 - NSCLC Novel Therapies (ID 211)

    • Event: WCLC 2013
    • Type: Poster Session
    • Track: Medical Oncology
    • Presentations: 1
    • +

      P3.11-050 - Sunitinib for the treatment of RET-translocated NSCLC: A case report (ID 693)

      09:30 - 16:30  |  Author(s): R. Büttner

      • Abstract

      Background
      RET-translocations have recently been identified as oncogenic drivers in a subset of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Up to now, there is limited information on the therapeutic value of RET-inhibitors in treating patients with RET-translocated NSCLC. Here we report on the clinical course of a patient with RET-translocated NSCLC treated with sunitinib, a multitarget tyrosinkinase-inhibitor with activity against RET.

      Methods
      A 65 year old woman with a non smoking history was diagnosed with adenocarcinoma of the left upper lobe in october 2009. Staging by CT and PET revealed stage II. Therefore the patient was referred to lobectomy plus lymphnode dissection. Pathologic work up in the following led to an upstaging to stage IIIA (pT1N2M0L1V0R0,GIII). The patient refused to get adjuvant chemotherapy but postoperative radiotherapy was applied. In may 2012 the patient developed left-sided pleural carcinomatosis and a thoracoscopic biopsy confirmed recurrence of the bronchial adenocarcinoma. Molecular workup of the available tissue showed EGFRwt and no evidence for ALK-translocation. As a platinum-based chemotherapy was not acceptable for the patient she was treated with pemetrexed monotherapy for 3 cycles leading to disease stabilization. At that timepoint the patient opted for a treatment holiday. In december 2012 CT-restaging showed progressive disease with increasing pleural tumor deposits. As the patient denied further cytostatic therapy, additional analyses for potential driver mutations were initiated and the existence of a KIF5B/RET-translocation was detected by FISH-analysis. As, at that timepoint, sunitinib was the only available RET-inhibitor at our site the patient was offered sunitinib treatment.

      Results
      Sunitinib was initiated in january 2013 (50mg qd, 4 weeks on/2 weeks off) with the patient at that timepoint not suffering from any symptoms (WHO 0). Due to severe toxicities (mucositis, fatigue, diarrhea) a dose reduction had to be performed allready during the first treatment cycle (37,5mg, 4/2 weeks). CT-restaging after 2 cycles showed stable disease. Treatment was continued, but, due to ongoing toxicities, the dose of sunitinib had to be further reduced (25mg qd, continously). In may 2013, with the patient free from tumor-associated symptoms, another CT-scan still revealed disease stabilization. At that timepoint the patient refused further treatment with sunitinib, due to subjectively inacceptable side effects (diarrhea, fatigue).

      Conclusion
      In this case of a patient with recurrent RET-translocated NSCLC treatment with sunitinib showed signs of clinical activity by inducing disease-stabilization for at least 4 months despite substantial dose reductions due to toxicities. As the patient withdrew further treatment, no further conclusions on the potential long term effects of such treatment can be drawn. Based on the preclinical evidence and the published case reports so far, testing of RET-inhibitors for the treatment of patients with RET-translocated NSCLC within prospective clinical trials is strongly recommended.