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H. Borghaei



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    MINI 04 - Clinical Care of Lung Cancer (ID 102)

    • Event: WCLC 2015
    • Type: Mini Oral
    • Track: Treatment of Advanced Diseases - NSCLC
    • Presentations: 1
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      MINI04.03 - Real-World Patterns of Access to Cancer Specialist Care Among Patients With Lung Cancer in the United States: A Claims Database Analysis (ID 1592)

      04:55 - 05:00 PM  |  Author(s): H. Borghaei

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background:
      Timely access to specialist care is an important first step in the care of patients with lung cancer (LC). This study describes real-world patterns of access to cancer specialist (CS) care in all LC patients and those with metastatic LC (mLC).

      Methods:
      Adult patients diagnosed with primary LC or mLC were identified in a US commercial claims database (01/01/2008 - 03/31/2014). Patients’ specialist visits were assessed before and after their first biopsy (index date). All patients had ≥3 months follow-up after index date. CS was defined as oncologists or hematologists. Patients were divided in four mutually exclusive groups based on the specialists seen in the 6 weeks pre-index period: patients seen by CS (± other specialists), pulmonologists (no CS, ± other specialists), internists or family physicians (no CS/pulmonologist, ± other specialists), and other. CS visits in the 8-weeks post-index were assessed for each group. Reversed Kaplan-Meier plots were used to describe time from index date to first CS visit.

      Results:
      The analysis included 75,163 LC and 25,191 mLC patients, with a median age of 67 [interquartile range (IQR): 59-76)] and 63 (IQR: 57-73) years and a median follow-up of 11 and 9 months, respectively. In the 8-week post-index period, over half of LC patients (54%) and nearly two-thirds of mLC patients (66%) had their first CS visit (Figure 1), while 38% of LC patients and 28% of mLC patients never saw a CS within 1-year of biopsy (Figure 1). In both samples, patients in the CS and pulmonologist pre-index groups were more likely to see a CS in follow-up (Figure 2; p<0.001 for all groups). Figure 1 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 2





      Conclusion:
      A substantial proportion of patients diagnosed with LC and mLC did not see any CS after biopsy, which may negatively affect access to optimal and timely treatment.

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    MINI 37 - SCLC Therapy (ID 165)

    • Event: WCLC 2015
    • Type: Mini Oral
    • Track: Small Cell Lung Cancer
    • Presentations: 1
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      MINI37.02 - The Novel HSP90 Inhibitor-SN-38 Conjugate (STA-12-8666), Is Highly Active in Preclinical Models of Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC) (ID 911)

      06:35 - 06:40 PM  |  Author(s): H. Borghaei

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background:
      Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly aggressive disease representing 12-13% of all lung cancers, with 5 year survival rate of only 6%. While most patients respond initially to cytotoxic chemotherapies such as irinotecan, etoposide, or carboplatin, resistance rapidly emerges and response to second line agents such as topotecan is limited. In contrast to non-small cell lung cancer, few targetable oncogenes have been identified in SCLC. STA-12-8666 is a small molecule drug, which binds the tumor-concentrated active form of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), with a cleavable linker attached to SN-38, the active metabolite of irinotecan. Cleavage of the linker within the tumor provides time-release of SN-38 at high local concentration, while significantly limiting drug exposure and toxicity in non-transformed tissue. The goal for this work was to evaluate STA-12-8666 for potential use as a new second line monotherapy, or as adjuvant in the frontline setting for SCLC.

      Methods:
      Three dose levels of STA-12-8666 were evaluated in comparison to irinotecan, ganetespib, carboplatin, etoposide, cisplatin and chemotherapy combinations in 4 independent SCLC xenograft models, including parental and cisplatin-resistant derivative cell lines (SCLC1, SR2), and a patient-derived xenograft (PDX). STA-12-8666 was also evaluated in drug combinations. Intratumoral responses were profiled using a mass spectrometry based approach to evaluate kinase pathway activation, and results confirmed by immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. Pharmacokinetic analysis was performed to benchmark retention of STA-12-8666 to irinotecan in lung tumors.

      Results:
      In all four models, high dose (150 mg/kg) STA-12-8666 was tolerated without side effects. In most cases, three doses administered at weekly intervals caused complete regression of established tumors, with response durable for > 2 months. Those tumors that regrew were responsive to re-dosing with STA-12-8666, and were subsequently eliminated. Further, STA-12-8666 induced complete or partial regression of tumors that progressed following first or second line treatment with standard of care agents for SCLC. Low dose (50 mg/kg) STA-12-8666 inhibited tumor growth and enhanced the anti-tumor activity of 30 mg/kg carboplatin, resulting in complete tumor regression. Pharmacokinetic and proteomic analysis confirmed STA-12-8666 concentration in tumors, and identified a signature of DNA damage response biomarkers in STA-12-8666-treated tumors that is different from that induced by irinotecan.

      Conclusion:
      The findings that HSP90i-drug conjugate STA-12-8666 is highly active in preclinical models of SCLC (in both frontline and second line settings) support the evaluation of this novel compound in clinical trials.

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    MS 11 - New Approaches to Combined Modality Therapy for Stage III Disease (ID 29)

    • Event: WCLC 2015
    • Type: Mini Symposium
    • Track: Treatment of Locoregional Disease – NSCLC
    • Presentations: 1
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      MS11.03 - New Systemic Approaches (Targeted Therapies and Immune Therapies) (ID 1898)

      03:00 - 03:20 PM  |  Author(s): H. Borghaei

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Abstract:


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    MTE 02 - Patients, Investigators and Pharmaceuticals Working Together to Accelerate Research and Access: The Lung Cancer Master Protocol (Lung-MAP) Clinical Trial (Ticketed Session) (ID 54)

    • Event: WCLC 2015
    • Type: Meet the Expert (Ticketed Session)
    • Track: Advocacy
    • Presentations: 1
    • Moderators:
    • Coordinates: 9/07/2015, 07:00 AM - 08:00 AM, 105
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      MTE02.01 - Patients, Investigators and Pharmaceuticals Working Together to Accelerate Research and Access: The Lung Cancer Master Protocol (Lung-MAP) Clinical Trial (ID 1979)

      07:00 - 07:30 AM  |  Author(s): H. Borghaei

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Abstract:
      The traditional obstacles to approval of oncologic therapeutic agents, especially targeted therapies that address a rare-biomarker defined group of patients are the long processes from initial drug discovery to clinical implementation, the difficulties in recruitment for these clinical trials and high number of screen failures and the overall low rate of enrollment in clinical trials. The Lung Master Protocol (Lung-MAP, S1400) is a precedent-setting clinical trial designed to advance the efficient development of targeted therapies for squamous cell cancer of the lung (SCCA). There are few new effective therapeutic options for patients with advanced lung SCCA. Immunotherapies, including nivolumab, have already shown clear benefit for patients with SCCA in 2015 leading to approval by the FDA which has been an unprecedented step forward for the treatment of patients, however we are still lacking predictive markers for these therapies that are reliably selecting patients more likely to benefit. Lung-MAP (S1400) is aiming to identify biomarker-drug pairs that will lead to successful therapeutic outcomes and registration of new agents. It is a registration-intent master protocol that includes a screening component and clinical trial component; the clinical trial component includes multiple sub-studies which independently evaluate investigational therapies. The clinical trial component is designed to be modular such that new sub-studies can be added either as other sub-studies close or as new biomarker-drug pairs are identified for testing in this patient population. Lung-MAP is utlilizing a broad NGS screening platform capitalizing on the expanding application of genomic sequencing in oncology that has through the Cancer Genome Atlas and other sequencing initiatives revealed targetable genetic aberrations including gene mutations, rearrangements, amplifications, and deletions, and creating an immense opportunity to implement personalized therapy with a high potential to improve patients outcomes. Immunotherapy has been integrated in the design of Lung-MAP from its launch in June of 2014. The original study design and structure is shown in the figure. Figure 1 The modular design of the study has allowed for the flexibility to adapt to the approval of nivolumab and the hault in further development of AMG102 (rilotumumab) with discontinuation of the corresponding sub-study by implementing timely modifications which include the following:1)Eligibility has changed from exclusively second line therapy to second-or more line therapy 2)Pre-screening, while patient receive first line therapy has been added to boost accrual 3)the unmatched arm has been changed to a single (not randomized) arm study with the anti-PD-L1 agent MEDI-4736. Theses changes are reflected in the figure. Each independently conducted and analyzed sub-study specifies investigator-assessed progression-free survival (IA-PFS) and overall survival (OS) as the co-primary endpoints for the phase 3 primary objectives. The primary objectives for the phase 3 are to determine if there is a statistically significant difference in OS and to determine if there is both a clinically meaningful and statistically significant difference in IA-PFS. The conduct of Lung-MAP relies on close collaboration (a public-private partnership) among the NCI and NCTN (spearheaded by SWOG), the pharmaceutical industry, the Foundation for the NIH (FNIH), Friends of Cancer Research, advocates, and FDA. This Master Protocol will improve genomic screening of SCC patients for clinical trial entry, and improve time lines for drug-biomarker testing, allowing for inclusion of the maximum numbers of otherwise eligible patients. The clinical trial continues to be updated following science and alterations in the therapeutic landscape, with adaptations in design and incorporation of new agents against matched targets and the implementation of novel immunotherapy approaches for the unmatched arm. Figure 2





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    ORAL 02 - PD1 Axis Immunotherapy 2 (ID 87)

    • Event: WCLC 2015
    • Type: Oral Session
    • Track: Treatment of Advanced Diseases - NSCLC
    • Presentations: 1
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      ORAL02.05 - Safety and Efficacy of First-Line Nivolumab (NIVO; Anti-Programmed Death-1 [PD-1]) and Ipilimumab in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) (ID 786)

      11:28 - 11:39 AM  |  Author(s): H. Borghaei

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background:
      Combined blockade of the PD‐1 and cytotoxic T‐lymphocyte‐associated antigen‐4 (CTLA‐4) immune checkpoint pathways has shown improved responses, encouraging survival rates, and a manageable safety profile in advanced melanoma. NIVO, a fully human IgG4 PD-1 immune checkpoint inhibitor antibody, has activity across NSCLC histologies and is approved in the US for treatment of metastatic squamous (SQ) NSCLC with progression on or after platinum-based chemotherapy. This phase 1 study evaluated the safety and efficacy of first‐line therapy with NIVO plus ipilimumab (IPI), an IgG1 CTLA‐4 checkpoint receptor blocking antibody, in chemotherapy‐naïve patients with advanced NSCLC.

      Methods:
      Patients (N=49) received NIVO plus IPI at the 1+3 mg/kg or 3+1 mg/kg combination dose, respectively (one SQ and one non‐SQ cohort per dose level), every 3 weeks for 4 cycles, followed by NIVO 3 mg/kg every 2 weeks until progression or unacceptable toxicity. Objective response rate (ORR; RECIST v1.1) was evaluated overall and by baseline tumor PD‐1 ligand 1 (PD‐L1) expression (PD‐L1[+]: ≥5% tumor cells expressing PD‐L1). Response was assessed at weeks 10, 17, and 23, and every 3 months thereafter until progression.

      Results:
      Median follow‐up for all patients was 50 weeks. Across histologies, confirmed ORR was 13% (3/24) for NIVO1+IPI3 and 20% (5/25) for NIVO3+IPI1. Two of 3 and 4/5 responders in the NIVO1+IPI3 and NIVO3+IPI1 arms, respectively, achieved a response by first scan. Median duration of response was not reached (NR) in either group, and responses were ongoing in 67% (2/3) and 60% (3/5) of patients treated with NIVO1+IPI3 and NIVO3+IPI1, respectively. Two patients in the NIVO3+IPI1 group exhibited an unconventional “immune-related” response with 56% and 64% maximum reductions in target lesions and simultaneous appearance of new lesions. The 24-week progression-free survival (PFS) rates and median PFS were 44% and 16.1 weeks, respectively, for NIVO1+IPI3 and 33% and 14.4 weeks, respectively, for NIVO3+IPI1. One-year overall survival (OS) rates and median OS were 65% and NR, respectively, for NIVO1+IPI3 and 44% and 47.9 weeks, respectively, for NIVO3+IPI1. Thirty-eight of 49 treated patients were evaluable for PD-L1 expression; objective responses were observed in PD‐L1[+] (19%, 3/16) and PD‐L1[-] (14%; 3/22) patients. Across arms, grade 3–4 treatment-related adverse events (AEs) were reported in 25 patients (51%); grade 3 pneumonitis was reported in 3 (6%) patients. Treatment‐related AEs led to discontinuation in 18 patients (37%); 15 (31%) patients discontinued treatment during induction. Treatment‐related deaths (n=3) were due to respiratory failure, bronchopulmonary hemorrhage, and toxic epidermal necrosis.

      Conclusion:
      Treatment with NIVO plus IPI was associated with durable responses and encouraging survival regardless of tumor PD-L1 expression. The safety profile was managed using established safety guidelines. Updated OS and results from additional doses and schedules will be presented.

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    ORAL 04 - Adjuvant Therapy for Early Stage Lung Cancer (ID 99)

    • Event: WCLC 2015
    • Type: Oral Session
    • Track: Treatment of Localized Disease - NSCLC
    • Presentations: 1
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      ORAL04.04 - Discussant for ORAL04.01, ORAL04.02, ORAL04.03 (ID 3559)

      11:18 - 11:28 AM  |  Author(s): H. Borghaei

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

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    ORAL 30 - Community Practice (ID 141)

    • Event: WCLC 2015
    • Type: Oral Session
    • Track: Community Practice
    • Presentations: 1
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      ORAL30.03 - Access to Cancer Directed Therapies and Cancer Specialists in Patients with Metastatic Lung Cancer (ID 2899)

      05:07 - 05:18 PM  |  Author(s): H. Borghaei

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background:
      Access to cancer specialists and directed therapies is critical in the management of patients with metastatic lung cancer (mLC). This study aims to assess treatment patterns overall and stratified based on whether patients were seen or not by a cancer specialist in patients with de novo mLC.

      Methods:
      Adult patients diagnosed with de novo mLC between January 1, 2008 and March 31, 2014 were selected from a US commercial health claims database. All patients were followed for a minimum 3 months after the index date, defined as their first biopsy date. Patients who saw an oncologist/hematologist from 6 weeks before index date until the end of follow-up (end of data availability or health plan eligibility) were included in the cohort of patients who saw a cancer specialist. The remaining patients were included in the cohort of patients who did not see a cancer specialist. In both cohorts, the use of systemic antineoplastic therapy (Table 1) and radiation therapy was assessed following the index date.

      Results:
      The study sample consisted of 25,191 mLC patients, followed for a median of 9 months. Median age was 63 years (interquartile range: 57-73). 28.4% of the patients did not see a cancer specialist. Overall, 89.9% of the mLC patients received a cancer directed therapy during the follow-up (Table 1). The proportion of patients who received a cancer directed therapy during the follow-up was larger among patients seen by a cancer specialist (91.2% vs. 86.7%, p < .0001) (Table 1). Among patients who did not see a cancer specialist, 86.7% received antineoplastic therapy and/or radiotherapy during the follow-up, 2.6% were untreated and admitted to hospice, and 10.6% were untreated and were not admitted to hospice. The majority of patients who were not seen by a cancer specialist and received treatment were seen prior to the initiation of therapy by pulmonologists, internists, family physicians, and/or radiologists. Figure 1



      Conclusion:
      Approximately one in ten patients with de novo mLC did not receive any cancer directed therapy and a little more than one in four patients were not seen directly by a cancer specialist. Among patients not seen by a cancer specialist many received some form of cancer directed therapy. However, the access to cancer directed therapy of these patients remained significantly lower than that of mLC patients seen by a cancer specialist. Further research should be directed towards understanding and addressing disparities in access to appropriate cancer care.

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    ORAL 33 - ALK (ID 145)

    • Event: WCLC 2015
    • Type: Oral Session
    • Track: Treatment of Advanced Diseases - NSCLC
    • Presentations: 1
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      ORAL33.03 - Updated Efficacy/Safety Data From the Phase 2 NP28761 Study of Alectinib in ALK+ NSCLC (ID 1261)

      05:07 - 05:18 PM  |  Author(s): H. Borghaei

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Background:
      ALK gene rearrangements occur in approximately 3–6% of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Crizotinib has demonstrated efficacy in ALK+ NSCLC, however many patients experience systemic and/or central nervous system (CNS) disease progression within one year of treatment. Alectinib, a CNS-penetrant and highly selective ALK inhibitor, has shown preclinical activity in the CNS (Ou, et al. JTO 2013) and clinical efficacy in crizotinib-naïve (Ohe, et al. ASCO 2015) and pre-treated (Ou, et al. ASCO 2015; Gandhi, et al. ASCO 2015) ALK+ NSCLC patients. We will present updated efficacy and safety outcomes from the phase II NP28761 study (NCT01871805).

      Methods:
      North American patients ≥18 years of age with ALK+ NSCLC (by FDA-approved FISH test), disease progression following first-line crizotinib, and ECOG PS ≤2 were enrolled. Patients received oral alectinib (600mg) twice daily until progression, death or withdrawal. The primary endpoint was overall response rate (ORR) by independent review committee (IRC) using RECIST v1.1. Secondary endpoints included investigator-assessed ORR; progression-free survival (PFS); quality of life (QoL); CNS response rate; disease control rate (DCR); and safety.

      Results:
      At data cut-off (24 October 2014), 87 patients were enrolled in the intent-to-treat population. Median age was 54 years; 74% had received prior chemotherapy; 60% of patients had baseline CNS metastases, of whom 65% (34/52) had prior brain radiation therapy. Median follow-up was 20.7 weeks. ORR by IRC was 48% (95% CI 36–60); median PFS was 6.3 months (Table 1). In patients with measurable CNS lesions at baseline (n=16), IRC CNS ORR was 69% (95% CI 41–89) and CNS DCR was 100% (complete response, 13%; partial response, 56%; stable disease, 31%). In patients with measurable or non-measurable CNS disease (n=52), IRC CNS ORR was 39% (95% CI 25–53) and 11 patients (21%) had complete CNS responses. The most common grade ≥3 AEs were elevated levels of blood creatine phosphokinase (8%), alanine aminotransferase (6%) and aspartate aminotransferase (5%); no GI toxicities leading to treatment withdrawal were reported. Clinically meaningful improvements were seen in EORTC QLQ-C30 items, including Global Health Status. Figure 1



      Conclusion:
      Alectinib (600mg twice daily) was well tolerated and demonstrated clinical efficacy in patients with ALK+ NSCLC disease who had progressed on prior crizotinib. A clinical benefit with alectinib was also observed in patients with CNS lesions at baseline. These data are preliminary; updated efficacy and safety data from a cut-off date of 27 April 2015 will be presented.

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    P1.01 - Poster Session/ Treatment of Advanced Diseases – NSCLC (ID 206)

    • Event: WCLC 2015
    • Type: Poster
    • Track: Treatment of Advanced Diseases - NSCLC
    • Presentations: 1
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      P1.01-079 - Pembrolizumab Plus Chemotherapy vs Chemotherapy Alone as First-Line Therapy for NSCLC (ID 2993)

      09:30 - 09:30 AM  |  Author(s): H. Borghaei

      • Abstract
      • Slides

      Background:
      Platinum doublet chemotherapy with or without bevacizumab is the standard first-line therapy for patients with advanced NSCLC without EGFR sensitizing mutations or ALK rearrangement. Pembrolizumab (MK-3475), a humanized monoclonal antibody against PD-1 designed to block the interaction of PD-1 with its ligands PD-L1 and PD-L2, has shown efficacy and a manageable toxicity profile in patients with NSCLC treated at doses ranging from 2 mg/kg every 3 weeks to 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks. In 45 patients with treatment-naive advanced NSCLC treated in KEYNOTE-001, single-agent pembrolizumab has demonstrated a response rate of 26%.

      Methods:
      KEYNOTE-021 (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02039674) is an international, open-label, multi-arm, phase 1/2 trial of pembrolizumab for advanced NSCLC. After establishing the safety and tolerability of pembrolizumab plus carboplatin and pemetrexed in phase 1, a randomized phase 2 cohort comparing the efficacy of pembrolizumab plus carboplatin and pemetrexed with that of carboplatin and pemetrexed has been initiated. Key eligibility criteria for this cohort are previously untreated stage IIIB/IV nonsquamous NSCLC, no sensitizing EGFR mutation or ALK rearrangement, and ECOG PS 0-1. Patients will be randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive pembrolizumab 200 mg Q3W plus carboplatin and pemetrexed at standard doses or carboplatin and pemetrexed alone. Randomization will be stratified by PD-L1 expression determined by immunohistochemistry at a central laboratory (positive [membranous expression in ≥1% of tumor cells] vs negative). Pembrolizumab will be given for 24 months or until progression, intolerable toxicity, or investigator decision. Pembrolizumab may be continued beyond radiographic progression in eligible patients. Carboplatin and pemetrexed will be given for 4 cycles followed by maintenance pemetrexed, alone or with pembrolizumab. Patients allocated to the chemotherapy-alone arm who experience progression may cross over to the pembrolizumab arm of the study. AEs will be monitored throughout treatment and for 30 days thereafter. Response will be assessed every 6 weeks for the first 18 weeks, then every 9 weeks in year 1 and every 12 weeks in year 2. Survival follow-up will occur every 3 months after discontinuation of study treatment. Primary end point is progression-free survival (RECIST v1.1, central review); secondary end points include overall survival, objective response rate, and correlation of PD-L1 expression with antitumor activity. This cohort is currently enrolling patients.

      Results:
      Not applicable.

      Conclusion:
      Not applicable.

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    P2.07 - Poster Session/ Small Cell Lung Cancer (ID 222)

    • Event: WCLC 2015
    • Type: Poster
    • Track: Small Cell Lung Cancer
    • Presentations: 1
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      P2.07-010 - Alisertib (MLN8237)+Paclitaxel versus Placebo+Paclitaxel for Relapsed SCLC (ID 1158)

      09:30 - 09:30 AM  |  Author(s): H. Borghaei

      • Abstract
      • Slides

      Background:
      Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive malignant disease comprising approximately 14% of all lung cancers, with approximately 31,000 new diagnoses each year in the USA. SCLC has a very poor prognosis, particularly in patients presenting with extensive stage disease. Platinum-based combinations are standard first-line therapy for SCLC; however, relapse is almost universal (≥85%) and patients require further treatment in subsequent lines. Effective new targeted therapies are needed to improve the poor outcomes observed in SCLC. Alisertib is an investigational, orally available, selective inhibitor of Aurora A kinase. Alisertib has shown single-agent antitumor activity in preclinical in vivo models of SCLC and has demonstrated synergism with paclitaxel in this setting. Single-agent alisertib has demonstrated promising efficacy in patients with relapsed/refractory SCLC (Melichar B, et al. Lancet Oncol 2015;16[4]:395–405). Further, phase 1 and 2 evaluation of alisertib+paclitaxel in patients with relapsed ovarian cancer and breast cancer has suggested the antitumor activity of this combination (Falchook G, et al. Int J Gynecol Cancer 2013;23[8] Suppl_1:abstract; Coleman R, et al. Ann Oncol 2014;25[Suppl_4]:abstract 876O). Here we describe the design and objectives of an ongoing phase 2, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of alisertib+paclitaxel versus placebo+paclitaxel in patients with relapsed SCLC and previously treated with only one line of platinum-based therapy (NCT02038647).

      Methods:
      Approximately 166 adult patients with relapsed SCLC after standard first-line platinum-based therapy, measurable disease by RECIST v1.1, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0 or 1 will be enrolled at approximately 80 sites in the USA and Europe. Patients will be randomized 1:1 (stratified by type of relapse [sensitive vs resistant/refractory] and presence of brain metastases) to receive 28-day cycles of either alisertib 40 mg or matched placebo PO twice daily on days 1−3, 8−10, and 15−17, plus paclitaxel 60 or 80 mg/m[2 ]IV, respectively, on days 1, 8, and 15, until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. The primary endpoint of the trial is progression-free survival (PFS). Assuming a hazard ratio of 0.6 for PFS, a total of 138 progression/death events will be required to provide 85% power (two-sided alpha=0.05). Secondary endpoints include: overall and complete response rates; disease control rate; duration of response; overall survival; safety (NCI-CTCAE v4.03); alisertib pharmacokinetics; and symptom-related endpoints (symptom score, time to symptom relief, time to symptom progression). Evaluation of candidate biomarkers in tumor tissue specimens and in circulating tumor cells (CTC)/circulating tumor DNA, change from baseline in CTC numbers, and health-related quality of life (EORTC QLQ-C30/QLQ-LC13 instruments) are exploratory endpoints. As of 10 April 2015, there are 60 sites open in 6 countries with 90 patients randomized. The study continues to enroll patients.

      Results:
      not applicable

      Conclusion:
      not applicable

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