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M. Boyer

Moderator of

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    PL01 - Opening Plenary (ID 72)

    • Event: WCLC 2013
    • Type: Plenary Session
    • Track: Prevention & Epidemiology
    • Presentations: 2
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      PL01.01 - 40 Years IASLC (ID 4032)

      F. Hirsch

      • Abstract
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

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      PL01.02 - You Can Take on the Tobacco Industry and Win (ID 4031)

      N. Roxon

      • Abstract
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

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    PL03 - Presidential Symposium Including Top Rated Abstracts (ID 85)

    • Event: WCLC 2013
    • Type: Plenary Session
    • Track:
    • Presentations: 8
      • Abstract
      • Slides

      Background
      The main challenge in computed tomography (CT) screening for lung cancer is the high prevalence of pulmonary nodules and the relatively low incidence of lung cancer. Thresholds for nodule size and growth rate, which determine which nodules require additional diagnostic procedures, should be based on the lung cancer probability of the individual.

      Methods
      Diameter, volume and volume-doubling time (VDT) of 9,681 non-calcified nodules detected by CT screening in 7,155 subjects were used to quantify lung cancer probability. Complete coverage on all lung cancer diagnoses was obtained by linkages with the national cancer registry. The nodule management algorithm recommended by the ACCP was evaluated and an improved algorithm, based on lung cancer probability, was proposed.

      Results
      Lung cancer probability was low in subjects with a nodule volume <100mm³ (≤0.7%) or maximum transverse diameter <5mm (≤0.6%) Moreover, probability in these subjects was not significantly different from that in subjects without nodules (0.4%). Lung cancer probability was 0.9-5.8% for nodules with a volume 100-300mm³ or a diameter 5-10mm; the VDT further stratified the probability: 0.0-0.9% for VDTs>600days, 4.0% for VDTs 400-600days and 6.7-25.0% for VDTs<400days. Lung cancer probability was high for participants with nodule volumes ≥300mm³ (8.9-26.1%) or diameters ≥10mm (11.1-26.2%), even with long VDTs. Finally, raising the thresholds for nodule size recommended by the ACCP for an indeterminate result from 4mm to 5mm and for a positive result from 8mm to 10mm, would yield fewer follow-up CT examinations (from 29.8% to 22.2%) and fewer additional diagnostic procedures (from 8.9% to 5.3%) while maintaining the sensitivity at 94.2%.

      Conclusion
      Small nodules (volume <100mm³ or diameter <5mm) are not predictive for lung cancer. Immediate diagnostic evaluation is necessary for subjects with large nodules (volume ≥300mm³ or diameter ≥10mm) and only for subjects with nodules of intermediate size is VDT assessment advocated.

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      PL03.02 - DISCUSSANT (ID 3884)

      C. Berg

      • Abstract
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

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      PL03.03 - MesoVATS: A multi-centre randomised controlled trial of video assisted thoracoscopic pleurectomy versus talc pleurodesis in malignant pleural mesothelioma (ID 2423)

      R.C. Rintoul, A.J. Ritchie, J. Edwards, D.A. Waller, A. Coonar, E. Lovato, M. Bennett, C. Matthews, V. Hughes, J. Fox-Rushby, L.D. Sharples

      • Abstract
      • Slides

      Background
      Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) incidence is increasing and has no known cure. Non randomised studies suggest that video assisted thoracoscopic (VAT) pleurectomy is effective in controlling pleural effusion and may be associated with increased survival compared to talc pleurodesis.

      Methods
      A multicentre randomised controlled trial of VAT pleurectomy versus talc pleurodesis was undertaken for patients > 18 years with any sub-type confirmed or suspected MPM with a pleural effusion who were fit enough to undergo VAT pleurectomy. Exclusion criteria included previous pleurodesis by any approach. Previous malignancy was permitted if there was no evidence of active disease and MPM had been confirmed. Participants were risk stratified using a modified EORTC prognostic scoring system. Talc pleurodesis was performed via tube thoracostomy or by poudrage at thoracoscopy. VAT pleurectomy involved partial parietal pleurectomy and decortication of the visceral pleura, where appropriate, to achieve lung re-expansion. A total of 196 patients was required to show a survival difference at 1 year of 59% (VAT pleurectomy) versus 37% (talc pleurodesis). Ethical approval was granted by Huntingdon, Cambridge (UK) Research Ethics committee: H02/809; ISRCTN: 34321019; ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00821860.

      Results
      Between 2003 and 2012, 196 patients (120 confirmed, 76 suspected) were randomised across 9 UK centres. 21 cases suspected MPM were subsequently found not to have MPM and excluded (pre-planned in protocol), leaving 87 VAT pleurectomy and 88 talc pleurodesis for the main analysis. Baseline characteristics were similar between the two groups; overall mean age 69 years, 86% men and 75% had known asbestos exposure. Eighty four per cent showed epithelioid disease, 78% were IMIG stage 3/4 and 49% were high risk as per EORTC criteria. The allocated procedure was completed for 73 (83%) talc and 78 (90%) VAT pleurectomy patients. One year survival rates (primary outcome measure) were 57% for the talc group and 52% in the pleurectomy group (hazard ratio 1.03 (95% CI: 0.76, 1.42), p=0.83). Of the secondary outcome measures, pleural effusion was controlled in 37% of talc and 59% pleurectomy patients at one month (p=0.008) and in 57% of talc and 76% pleurectomy patients at 6 months (p=0.04). At 9 and 12 months control of pleural effusion was similar between groups. Median hospital stay was longer in pleurectomy patients (8 days (range 1-31) vs. 6 (range 1-15), p<0.001) and this group had significantly more complications, predominantly prolonged air leak (26% vs. 8%, p=0.009). Based on patients with complete data there was a significant benefit in EQ5D quality of life at 6 months (mean difference 0.08 (95%CI 0.003,0.16), p=0.042) and 12 months (mean difference 0.19 (95%CI 0.05,0.32), p=0.006) in favour of the pleurectomy group. Adjusting for bias due to missing data prior to death reduced the difference in 12 month EQ5D to 0.09 (95%CI -0.04,0.22), p=0.16.

      Conclusion
      MesoVATS showed that VAT pleurectomy significantly improved control of pleural effusion versus talc pleurodesis and improved quality of life. However, overall survival was not increased and the pleurectomy group experienced more complications. Subgroup analyses will investigate which patients benefit most from which intervention. Funded by the BUPA Foundation

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      PL03.04 - DISCUSSANT (ID 3885)

      V. Rusch

      • Abstract
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

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      PL03.05 - An intergroup randomized phase III comparison of standard-dose (60 Gy) versus high-dose (74 Gy) chemoradiotherapy (CRT) +/- cetuximab (cetux) for stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): Results on cetux from RTOG 0617 (ID 1424)

      J. Bradley, G.A. Masters, C. Hu, G. Blumenschein, J. Bogart, S. Schild, J.M. Michalski, V. Kavadi, Y.I. Garces, S. Narayan, L. Nedzi, C.G. Robinson, R.B. Wynn, R. Paulus, W.J. Curran, H. Choy

      • Abstract
      • Slides

      Background
      The two primary objectives of RTOG 0617 were to compare the overall survival(OS) differences of 1) standard-dose(SD)(60Gy) versus high-dose(HD)(74Gy) radiotherapy (RT) with concurrent chemotherapy(CT); and 2) the addition of cetux to standard CRT. Cetux is a monoclonal Ab targeting EGFR with activity when combined with CT in metastatic NSCLC and head and neck cancer (HNC), and with RT in locally advanced HNC.

      Methods
      This Phase III Intergroup trial randomized pts in a 2 x 2 factorial design. Concurrent CRT included weekly paclitaxel(45 mg/m2) & carboplatin(AUC=2). Pts randomized to cetux received a 400 mg/m2 loading dose on Day 1 followed by weekly doses of 250 mg/m2. All pts were to receive 2 cycles of consolidation CT. This is the initial report of survival outcome based on cetux. The trial was designed for 450 evaluable patients with 80% power and a 1-sided alpha of 0.0125 to detect a 29% reduction in OS failure for each comparison (RT and cetux).

      Results
      544 pts were accrued, and 419 and 465 are eligible for RT and cetux analyses. Median follow up is 18.7 months. Cetux delivery was acceptable in both the concurrent and consolidation phases. Therapy related ≥Grade 3 non-hematologic toxicity was higher in the cetux group; 70.5% vs 50.7% (p<.0001). Grade 4 and 5 events were 35.8% and 28.2%, respectively. Median survival was 23.1 vs 23.5 months, & 18-month OS rates were 60.8% vs 60.2% on the cetux vs non-cetux arms, respectively (p=0.484, HR=0.99), which crossed a protocol-specified futility boundary for early reporting. As previously reported, median survival times and 18-month OS rates for SD and HD arms were 28.7 vs 19.5 months, and 66.9% vs 53.9% respectively (p=0.0007, HR=1.56). There was no significant interaction between RT dose and the use of cetux. The OS rates for the 4 arms of this trial are shown in Table. An H-score analysis, a measure EFGR positivity, is forthcoming.

      Table: Overall Survival Rates with 95% CI (pts accrued while all 4 arms were open)
      Time 60 Gy 74 Gy 60 Gy + Cetux 74 Gy + Cetux
      12m 78.4% (68.9, 85.4) 62.6% (51.7, 71.6) 80.0% (70.8, 86.6) 74.7% (64.9, 82.2)
      18m 67.9% (57.6, 76.2) 52.3% (41.5, 62.0) 67.1% (56.8, 75.5) 58.0% (47.6, 67.1)

      Conclusion
      In pts receiving CRT for Stage III NSCLC, 74 Gy is not superior to and may be worse than 60 Gy in terms of OS. Cetux provides no survival benefit in the setting of CRT for Stage III NSCLC.

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      PL03.06 - DISCUSSANT (ID 3886)

      J. Jassem

      • Abstract
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

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      PL03.07 - Treatment with Therapies Matched to Oncogenic Drivers Improves Survival in Patients with Lung Cancers: Results from The Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium (LCMC) (ID 2444)

      M.G. Kris, B. Johnson, L. Berry, D. Kwiatkowski, A.J. Iafrate, I. Wistuba, M. Varella-Garcia, W. Franklin, S. Aronson, P. Su, Y. Shyr, D..R. Camidge, L.V. Sequist, B. Glisson, F.R. Khuri, E.B. Garon, W. Pao, C.M. Rudin, J. Schiller, E.B. Haura, M.A. Socinski, K. Shirai, G. Giaccone, M. Ladanyi, K. Kugler, J.D. Minna, P. Bunn

      • Abstract
      • Slides

      Background
      Detecting and targeting the oncogenic drivers EGFR and ALK have transformed the care of patients with lung adenocarcinomas. The LCMC was established to use multiplexed assays to test tumors for alterations in 10 genes and provide the results to clinicians to select treatments and clinical trials matched to the driver detected.

      Methods
      Fourteen LCMC sites enrolled patients with metastatic lung adenocarcinomas and tested their tumors in CLIA laboratories for activating mutations in 10 oncogenic driver genes.

      Results
      Tumors were tested from 1,007 patients for at least one gene and 733 for all 10 genes. An oncogenic driver was found in 466 (64%) of fully-genotyped cases. Among these 733 tumors, drivers found were: KRAS 182 (25%), sensitizing EGFR 122 (17%), ALK rearrangements 57 (8%), “other” EGFR 29 (4%), two genes 24 (3%), HER2 19 (3%), BRAF 16 (2%), PIK3CA 6 (1%), MET amplification 5 (1%), NRAS 5 (1%), MEK1 1 (<1%), AKT1 0. For cases with any genotyping, we used results to select a targeted therapy or trial in 275 (28%). Among 938 patients with follow-up, the median survivals were 3.5 years for the 264 with an oncogenic driver treated with genotype-directed therapy, 2.4 years for the 318 with an oncogenic driver with no genotype-directed therapy, and 2.1 years for the 360 with no driver identified (p<0.0001).

      Conclusion
      Individuals with lung cancers with oncogenic drivers receiving a corresponding targeted agent lived longer than similar patients who did not. An actionable driver was detected in 64% of tumors from patients with lung adenocarcinomas; more than one was present in 3%. Multiplexed testing aided physicians in choosing therapies and targeted trials in 28% of patients. This paradigm for care and research will expand as genotyping becomes more efficient with Next-Gen platforms, additional drivers are identified (i.e.ROS1 and RET), and more targeted drugs become available in the pharmacy and through clinical trials. Supported by HSS NIH NCI 1RC2CA148394-01. Trial Registered with Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01014286.

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      PL03.08 - DISCUSSANT (ID 3887)

      B. Solomon

      • Abstract
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

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Author of

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    Y - Young Investigator & First Time Attendee Session (ID 77)

    • Event: WCLC 2013
    • Type: Other Sessions
    • Track: Other Topics
    • Presentations: 1
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      Y.2 - How to Present Data at a Conference (ID 643)

      M. Boyer

      • Abstract
      • Presentation
      • Slides

      Abstract not provided

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